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Carpinus Betulus
Carpinus betulus, commonly known as the European or common hornbeam, is a hornbeam native to Western Asia and central, eastern, and southern Europe, including southern England.[1] It requires a warm climate for good growth, and occurs only at elevations up to 600 metres (1,969 ft). It grows in mixed stands with oak, and in some areas beech, and is also a common tree in scree forests. Hornbeam
Hornbeam
was also known as 'Yoke Elm'.[2]Contents1 Description 2 Cultivation 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit]European Hornbeam
Hornbeam
seed catkinsIt is a deciduous small to medium-size tree reaching heights of 15–25 metres (49–82 ft), rarely 30 m (98 ft), and often has a fluted and crooked trunk. The bark is smooth and greenish-grey, even in old trees. The buds, unlike those of the beech, are 10 mm (0.39 in) long at the most, and pressed close to the twig
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Royal Horticultural Society
The Royal Horticultural Society
Royal Horticultural Society
(RHS), founded in 1804 as the Horticultural Society of London,[1][2] is the UK's leading gardening charity.[3][4][1] The RHS promotes horticulture through flower shows including the Chelsea Flower Show, Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, Tatton Park Flower Show and Cardiff Flower Show
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Epping Forest
Epping Forest
Epping Forest
is a 2,400 hectares (5,900 acres) area of ancient woodland between Epping in the north and Wanstead
Wanstead
in the south, straddling the border between Greater London
Greater London
and Essex. It is a former royal forest, and is managed by the City of London Corporation.[1] An area of 1,728 hectares (4,270 acres) is a Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest[2][3] and a Special
Special
Area of Conservation.[4] It gives its name to the Epping Forest
Epping Forest
local government district, which covers part of it. The forest is approximately 19 kilometres (12 mi) long in the north-south direction, but no more than 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) from east to west at its widest point, and in most places considerably narrower. It lies on a ridge between the valleys of the rivers Lea and Roding
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Pollarding
Pollarding, a pruning system involving the removal of the upper branches of a tree, promotes a dense head of foliage and branches. In ancient Rome, Propertius
Propertius
mentioned pollarding during the 1st century BCE.[1] The practice has occurred commonly in Europe since medieval times and takes place today in urban areas worldwide, primarily to maintain trees at a predetermined height.[2] Traditionally, people pollarded trees for one of two reasons: for fodder to feed livestock or for wood. Fodder
Fodder
pollards produced "pollard hay", which was used as livestock feed; they were pruned at intervals of two to six years so their leafy material would be most abundant
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Lepidoptera
Aglossata Glossata Heterobathmiina Zeugloptera Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
(/ˌlɛpɪˈdɒptərə/ lep-i-DOP-tər-ə) is an order of insects that includes butterflies and moths (both are called lepidopterans). About 180,000 species of the Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
are described, in 126 families[1] and 46 superfamilies,[2] 10% of the total described species of living organisms.[2][3] It is one of the most widespread and widely recognizable insect orders in the world.[4] The Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
show many variations of the basic body structure that have evolved to gain advantages in lifestyle and distribution
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Case-bearer
The Coleophoridae
Coleophoridae
are a family of large moths, belonging to the huge superfamily Gelechioidea. Collectively known as case-bearers, casebearing moths or case moths, this family is represented on all continents, but the majority are found in temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere. They are most common in the Palearctic, and rare in sub-Saharan Africa, South America, and Australia; consequently, they probably originated (like most or all other Gelechioidea families) in northern Eurasia.They are relatively common in houses, they seek out moist areas to rest and procreate.[1] Description and ecology[edit] These "micromoths" are generally of slender build, and like in many of their relatives, the margins of their wings usually consist of a "fringe" of hairs. The tiny caterpillar larvae initially feed internally on the leaves, flowers, or seeds of their host plants
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Moth
Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth,[1] many of which are yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.Contents1 Differences between butterflies and moths 2 Etymology 3 Caterpillar 4 History 5 Economics5.1 Significance to humans 5.2 Predators and parasites6 Attraction to light 7 Notable moths 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksDifferences between butterflies and moths[edit] Main article: Comparison of butterflies and moths While the butterflies form a monophyletic group, the moths, comprising the rest of the Lepidoptera, do not
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Öland
Öland
Öland
(Swedish pronunciation: [ˈøːland] ( listen), known in Latin
Latin
as Oelandia, and sometimes written Øland in other Scandinavian languages, and Oland internationally) is the second largest Swedish island and the smallest of the traditional provinces of Sweden. Öland
Öland
has an area of 1,342 square kilometres (518 square miles) and is located in the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
just off the coast of Småland
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Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of Sweden Konungariket Sverige[a]FlagGreater coat of armsMotto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a] "For Sweden
Sweden
– With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b] Thou ancient, thou freeRoyal anthem: Kungssången Song of the KingLocation of  Sweden  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Stockholm 59°21′N 18°4′E /
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Ornamental Tree
Ornamental plants are plants that are grown for decorative purposes in gardens and landscape design projects, as houseplants, for cut flowers and specimen display. The cultivation of these, called floriculture, forms a major branch of horticulture.Contents1 Garden
Garden
plants 2 Trees 3 Grasses 4 Cultivation 5 The term 6 References 7 External links Garden
Garden
plants[edit] Commonly, ornamental [garden] plants are grown for the display of aesthetic features including: flowers, leaves, scent, overall foliage texture, fruit, stem and bark, and aesthetic form. In some cases, unusual features may be considered to be of interest, such as the prominent thorns of Rosa sericea
Rosa sericea
and cacti
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Cultivar
The term cultivar[nb 1] most commonly refers to an assemblage of plants selected for desirable characters that are maintained during propagation. More generally, cultivar refers to the most basic classification category of cultivated plants in the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). Most cultivars arose in cultivation, but a few are special selections from the wild. Popular ornamental garden plants like roses, camellias, daffodils, rhododendrons, and azaleas are cultivars produced by careful breeding and selection for floral colour and form. Similarly, the world's agricultural food crops are almost exclusively cultivars that have been selected for characters such as improved yield, flavour, and resistance to disease, and very few wild plants are now used as food sources
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Award Of Garden Merit
The Award of Garden Merit
Award of Garden Merit
(AGM) is a long-established annual award for plants by the British Royal Horticultural Society
Royal Horticultural Society
(RHS). It is based on assessment of the plants' performance under UK growing conditions.Contents1 History 2 Similar awards 3 Reviews3.1 Rescission4 Criteria 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Award of Garden Merit
Award of Garden Merit
is a mark of quality awarded, since 1922, to garden plants (including trees, vegetables and decorative plants) by the United Kingdom, Royal Horticultural Society
Royal Horticultural Society
(RHS). Awards are made annually after plant trials intended to judge the plants' performance under UK growing conditions
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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MHNT
The Muséum de Toulouse, sometimes known as MHNT or Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle de la ville de Toulouse, is a museum of natural history in Toulouse, France. It is located in the Busca-Montplaisir, and houses a collection of more than 2.5 million items.Contents1 History 2 Permanent exhibitions 3 Collections3.1 Prehistory 3.2 Botany 3.3 Entomology3.3.1 Coleoptera 3.3.2 Lepidoptera 3.3.3 Orthoptera3.4 Mineralogy 3.5 Ornithology 3.6 Osteology 3.7 Paleontology3.7.1 Invertebrates 3.7.2 Vertebrates4 Henri Gaussen
Henri Gaussen
Botanical Garden 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (November 2011)The museum was founded in 1796 by the naturalist Philippe-Isidore Picot de Lapeyrouse. It was at that time housed in the old buildings of the monastery of the carmelite friars. It was opened to the public in 1865 in its present location and under the directorship of Édouard Filhol
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European Forest Genetic Resources Programme
European Forest Genetic Resources Programme (EUFORGEN) is an international network that supports the conservation and sustainable use of forest genetic resources in Europe.[1] The programme’s tasks include to coordinate and promote in situ and ex situ conservation of forest genetic resources, to facilitate the exchange of information, and to increase public awareness of the need to conserve forest genetic resources.[2] EUFORGEN is funded by member countries and operates through working groups formed by experts from across Europe
Europe
who meet to exchange knowledge, analyse policies and practice, and develop science-based strategies to improve the management of forest genetic resources. EUFORGEN was established in 1994
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