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Carlo Cafiero
Carlo Cafiero
Carlo Cafiero
(September 1, 1846 – July 17, 1892) was an Italian anarchist, champion of Mikhail Bakunin
Mikhail Bakunin
during the second half of the 19th century and one of the main proponents of insurrectionary anarchism and anarcho-communism during the First International.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Conversion to Anarchism 1.3 Exile in Switzerland2 Quotes2.1 About Cafiero3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Carlo Cafiero
Carlo Cafiero
was born in Barletta, in the Apulia
Apulia
region of southern Italy, into a rich, land-owning family
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Murray Bookchin
Murray Bookchin
Murray Bookchin
(January 14, 1921 – July 30, 2006)[5] was an American social theorist, author, orator, historian, and political philosopher. A pioneer in the ecology movement,[6] Bookchin formulated and developed the theory of social ecology within anarchist, libertarian socialist, and ecological thought. He was the author of two dozen books covering topics in politics, philosophy, history, urban affairs, and ecology. Among the most important were Our Synthetic Environment (1962), Post-Scarcity Anarchism (1971) and The Ecology
Ecology
of Freedom (1982)
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Peter Kropotkin
Pyotr Alexeevich Kropotkin (/kroʊˈpɒtkɪn, krə-/;[10] Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Кропо́ткин; December 9, 1842 – February 8, 1921) was a Russian activist, revolutionary, scientist and philosopher who advocated anarchism. Born into an aristocratic land-owning family, he attended a military school and later served as an officer in Siberia, where he participated in several geological expeditions. He was imprisoned for his activism in 1874 and managed to escape two years later. He spent the next 41 years in exile in Switzerland, France (where he was imprisoned for almost four years) and in England. He returned to Russia after the Russian Revolution
Russian Revolution
in 1917, but was disappointed by the Bolshevik form of state socialism. Kropotkin was a proponent of a decentralised communist society free from central government and based on voluntary associations of self-governing communities and worker-run enterprises
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Workers' Council
A workers' council is a form of political and economic organization in which a single local administrative division, such as a municipality or a county, is governed by a council made up of temporary and instantly revocable delegates elected in the region's workplaces.[1] In a system with temporary and instantly revocable delegates, workers decide on what their agenda is and what their needs are. They also mandate a temporary delegate to divulge and pursue them. The temporary delegates are elected among the workers themselves, can be instantly revoked if they betray their mandate, and are supposed to change frequently. The delegates act as messengers, carrying and interchanging the intention of the groups of workers. On a larger scale, a group of delegates may in turn elect a delegate in a higher position to pursue their mandate, and so on, until the top delegates are running the industrial system of a state
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Worker Cooperative
A worker cooperative is a cooperative that is owned and self-managed by its workers. This control may be exercised in a number of ways. A cooperative enterprise may mean a firm where every worker-owner participates in decision-making in a democratic fashion, or it may refer to one in which management is elected by every worker-owner, and it can refer to a situation in which managers are considered, and treated as, workers of the firm. In traditional forms of worker cooperative, all shares are held by the workforce with no outside or consumer owners, and each member has one voting share
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Workers' Control
Workers' control is participation in the management of factories and other commercial enterprises by the people who work there. It has been variously advocated by anarchists, socialists, communists, social democrats, Distributionists and Christian democrats, and has been combined with various socialist and mixed economy systems. Workers' councils are a form of workers' control. Council communism, such as in the early Soviet Union, advocates workers' control through workers councils and factory committees. Syndicalism
Syndicalism
advocates workers' control through trade unions. Guild socialism
Guild socialism
advocates workers' control through a revival of the guild system
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Stateless Communism
In Marxist thought, communist society or the communist system is the type of society and economic system postulated to emerge from technological advances in the productive forces, representing the ultimate goal of the political ideology of Communism. A communist society is characterized by common ownership of the means of production with free access[1][2] to the articles of consumption and is classless and stateless,[3] implying the end of the exploitation of labour. [4][5] Communism
Communism
is a specific stage of socioeconomic development predicated upon a superabundance of material wealth, which is postulated to arise from advances in production technology and corresponding changes in the social relations of production
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Primitive Communism
Primitive communism
Primitive communism
is a concept originating from Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
who argued that hunter-gatherer societies were traditionally based on egalitarian social relations and common ownership.[1] A primary inspiration for both Marx and Engels were Lewis Henry Morgan's descriptions of "communism in living" as practised by the Iroquois Nation
Iroquois Nation
of North America.[2] In Marx's model of socioeconomic structures, societies with primitive communism had no hierarchical social class structures or capital accumulation.[3] Engels offered the first detailed theorization of primitive communism in 1884, with publication of The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State. Marx and Engels used the term more broadly than Marxists did later, and applied it not only to hunter-gatherers but also to some subsistence agriculture communities
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Prefigurative Politics
Prefigurative politics are the modes of organization and social relationships that strive to reflect the future society being sought by the group. According to Carl Boggs, who coined the term, the desire is to embody "within the ongoing political practice of a movement [...] those forms of social relations, decision-making, culture, and human experience that are the ultimate goal".[1] Prefigurativism is the attempt to enact prefigurative politics. Boggs was writing in the 1970s about revolutionary movements in Russia, Italy, Spain, and the US New Left. The concept of prefiguration was further applied by Sheila Rowbotham to the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s,[2] by Wini Breines to the US SDS;[3] and by John L. Hammond to the Portuguese Revolution.[4] The politics of prefiguration rejected the centrism and vanguardism of many of the groups and political parties of the 1960s. It is both a politics of creation, and one of breaking with hierarchy
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Mutual Aid (organization Theory)
In organization theory, mutual aid is a voluntary reciprocal exchange of resources and services for mutual benefit
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Luigi Galleani
Luigi Galleani
Luigi Galleani
(Italian: [luˈiːdʒi ɡalleˈaːni]; August 12, 1861 – November 4, 1931) was an Italian anarchist active in the United States
United States
from 1901 to 1919, viewed by historians as an insurrectionary anarchist. He is best known for his enthusiastic advocacy of "propaganda of the deed", i.e
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Apulia
Coordinates: 41°0′31″N 16°30′46″E / 41.00861°N 16.51278°E / 41.00861; 16.51278Apulia PugliaRegion of ItalyFlagCoat of armsCountry ItalyCapital BariGovernment • President Michele Emiliano (PD)Area • Total 19,358 km2 (7,474 sq mi)Population (31-12-2016) • Total 4,063,888 • Density 210/km2 (540/sq mi)Demonym(s) English: Apulian(s), Puglian(s) Italian: Pugliese, pl
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General Strike
A general strike (or mass strike) is a strike action in which a substantial proportion of the total labour force in a city, region, or country participates. General strikes are characterised by the participation of workers in a multitude of workplaces, and tend to involve entire communities. General strikes first occurred in the mid-19th century, and have characterised many historically important strikes.Contents1 History1.1 Antiquity 1.2 Modern era 1.3 Rosa Luxemburg2 Purpose 3 Concept3.1 Socialists, anarchists differ on tactics 3.2 Syndicalism
Syndicalism
and the general strike3.2.1 Industrial Workers of the World4 Reaction of orthodox labour 5 Notable general strikes 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Antiquity[edit] An early predecessor of the general strike may have been the secessio plebis in ancient Rome. In the Outline Of History, H.G
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Ricardo Flores Magón
Cipriano Ricardo Flores Magón, (Spanish pronunciation: [riˈkarðo ˈfloɾes maˈɣon], known as Ricardo Flores Magón; September 16, 1874 – November 21, 1922) was a noted Mexican anarchist
Mexican anarchist
and social reform activist.[1] His brothers Enrique and Jesús were also active in politics. Followers of the Magón brothers were known as Magonistas. He has been considered an important participant in the social movement that sparked the Mexican Revolution.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Flight to the U.S.A. 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit]Brothers Ricardo (left) and Enrique Flores Magón
Enrique Flores Magón
(right) at the Los Angeles County Jail, 1917.Ricardo was born on 16 September 1874, in San Antonio Eloxochitlán, Oaxaca, an indigenous Mazatec community
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Give-away Shop
Give-away shops, swap shops, freeshops, or free stores are stores where all goods are free. They are similar to charity shops, with mostly second-hand items—only everything is available at no cost. Whether it is a book, a piece of furniture, a garment or a household item, it is all freely given away, although some operate a one-in, one-out–type policy (swap shops).Contents1 Concept 2 Similar phenomena 3 See also 4 ReferencesConcept[edit] The free store is a form of constructive direct action that provides a shopping alternative to a monetary framework, allowing people to exchange goods and services outside of a money-based economy
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Egalitarian Community
Egalitarian communities are groups of people who have chosen to live together, with egalitarianism as one of their core values. A broad definition of egalitarianism is "equal access to resources and to decision-making power." For example, decision-making is done by consensus or another system in which each person has a voice; it is not done hierarchically with only one or a few people making choices that will affect the whole group. If the group shares assets (income, vehicles, etc.), they are distributed equitably throughout the group, and each member has access to more-or-less the same resources as any other member. Egalitarian communities are a type of commune (some communal groups are not egalitarian in nature). An "egalitarian decision" is a decision made by a group as opposed to a single individual
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