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Carl Siegfried
Carl Gustav Adolf Siegfried (22 January 1830, Magdeburg
Magdeburg
– 9 January 1903, Jena) was a German theologian who specialized in Old Testament studies. He studied theology and philology at the universities of Halle and Bonn. In 1859 he received his doctorate from Halle, and afterwards worked as a teacher at the cathedral gymnasium in Magdeburg
Magdeburg
and at the regional school in Pforta. In 1875, he was appointed professor of Old Testament theology at the University of Jena.[1] Selected works[edit] Spinoza
Spinoza
als Kritiker und Ausleger des Alten Testaments, 1867 – Spinoza
Spinoza
as a critic and interpreter of the Old Testament. Philo von Alexandria als Ausleger des Alten Testaments. 1875 – Philo of Alexandria as an interpreter of the Old Testament. Lehrbuch der neuhebräischen Sprache und Litteratur
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Magdeburg
Magdeburg
Magdeburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈmakdəbʊɐ̯k] ( listen); Low Saxon: Meideborg, [ˈmaˑɪdebɔɐ̯x]) is the capital city and the second largest city of the state of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Magdeburg
Magdeburg
is situated on the Elbe
Elbe
River and was one of the most important medieval cities of Europe. Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
and founder of the archbishopric of Magdeburg, was buried in the town's cathedral after his death. Magdeburg's version of German town law, known as Magdeburg
Magdeburg
rights, spread throughout Central and Eastern Europe. The city is also well known for the Sack of Magdeburg, which sparked outrage across the Protestant world and became the worst massacre of the Thirty Years' War
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Hebrew Literature
Hebrew literature consists of ancient, medieval, and modern writings in the Hebrew language. It is one of the primary forms of Jewish literature, though there have been cases of literature written in Hebrew by non-Jews.[1] Hebrew literature was produced in many different parts of the world throughout the medieval and modern eras, while contemporary Hebrew literature is largely Israeli literature
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
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Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie
(German: Universal German Biography) is one of the most important and most comprehensive biographical reference works in the German language.[1] It was published by the Historical Commission of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences between 1875 and 1912 in 56 volumes, printed in Leipzig
Leipzig
by Duncker & Humblot
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Esther
Esther
Esther
(/ˈɛstər/; Hebrew: אֶסְתֵּר‬, Modern ’Estēr, Tiberian ʼEsetēr), born Hadassah (Hebrew: הֲדַסָּה‬, Modern Hadasa, Tiberian Haḏasā), is the eponymous heroine of the Book of Esther. According to the Hebrew Bible, Esther
Esther
was a Jewish
Jewish
queen of the Persian king
Persian king
Ahasuerus
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Nehemiah
Nehemiah
Nehemiah
is the central figure of the Book of Nehemiah, which describes his work in rebuilding Jerusalem during the Second Temple period. He was governor of Persian Judea under Artaxerxes I of Persia[1] (c. 5th century BC). The name is pronounced /ˌniːəˈmaɪə/ or /ˌniːhəˈmaɪə/ in English
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Ezra
Ezra
Ezra
(/ˈɛzrə/; Hebrew: עזרא‬, Ezra;[1] fl. 480–440 BCE), also called Ezra
Ezra
the Scribe (עזרא הסופר‬, Ezra
Ezra
ha-Sofer) and Ezra
Ezra
the Priest in the Book of Ezra, was a Jewish scribe and a priest
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Song Of Solomon
The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon
Song of Solomon
or Canticles (Hebrew: שִׁיר הַשִּׁירִים‬, Šîr HašŠîrîm, Greek: ᾎσμα ᾎσμάτων, asma asmaton, both meaning Song of Songs), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim
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Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
(/ɪˌkliːziˈæstiːz/; Greek: Ἐκκλησιαστής, Ekklēsiastēs, Hebrew: קֹהֶלֶת‬, qōheleṯ) is one of 24 books of the Tanakh
Tanakh
or Hebrew Bible, where it is classified as one of the Ketuvim
Ketuvim
(or "Writings"). Originally written c. 450-180 BCE, it is also among the canonical Wisdom Books in the Old Testament
Old Testament
of most denominations of Christianity. The title Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastes
is a Latin transliteration of the Greek translation of the Hebrew Kohelet, the pseudonym used by the author of the book. The book is a musing by a King of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
as he relates his experiences and draws lessons from them, often self-critical. The author, introducing himself as the son of David, discusses the meaning of life and the best way to live
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Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
(/ˈɡɜːrtə/;[1][2][3] German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə] ( listen); 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman. His works include four novels; epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; and treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour. In addition, there are numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him extant. A literary celebrity by the age of 25, Goethe was ennobled by the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Carl August in 1782 after taking up residence there in November 1775 following the success of his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther
Werther
(1774). He was an early participant in the Sturm und Drang literary movement
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Jena
Jena
Jena
(German pronunciation: [ˈjeːna] ( listen)) is a German university city and the second largest city in Thuringia. Together with the nearby cities of Erfurt
Erfurt
and Weimar, it forms the central metropolitan area of Thuringia
Thuringia
with approximately 500,000 inhabitants, while the city itself has a population of about 110,000. Jena
Jena
is a centre of education and research; the Friedrich Schiller University was founded in 1558 and has 21,000 students today and the Ernst-Abbe- Fachhochschule Jena
Jena
counts another 5,000 students. Furthermore, there are many institutes of the leading German research societies. Jena
Jena
was first mentioned in 1182 and stayed a small town until the 19th century, when industry developed
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Hermann Leberecht Strack
Hermann Leberecht Strack (6 May 1848 – 5 October 1922) was a German Protestant theologian and orientalist; born in Berlin.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected works 3 Translations 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Since 1877 he was assistant professor of Old Testament exegesis and Semitic languages at the University of Berlin. He was the foremost Christian authority in Germany on Talmudic and rabbinic literature, and studied rabbinics under Steinschneider. Since the reappearance of anti-Semitism in Germany, Strack had been the champion of the Jews against the attacks of such men as Hofprediger Adolf Stoecker, Professor August Rohling, and others. In 1885 Strack became the editor of Nathanael. Zeitschrift für die Arbeit der Evangelischen Kirche an Israel, published at Berlin; and in 1883 he founded the Institutum Judaicum, which aimed at the conversion of Jews to Christianity
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Spinoza
Baruch Spinoza
Spinoza
(/bəˈruːk spɪˈnoʊzə/;[6] Dutch: [baːˈrux spɪˈnoːzaː]; born Benedito de Espinosa, Portuguese: [bɨnɨˈðitu ðɨ ʃpiˈnɔzɐ]; 24 November 1632 – 21 February 1677, later Benedict de Spinoza) was a Dutch philosopher of Sephardi/Portuguese origin.[5] By laying the groundwork for the 18th-century Enlightenment[7] and modern biblical criticism,[8] including modern conceptions of the self and the universe,[9] he came to be considered one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy.[10] Along with René Descartes, Spinoza
Spinoza
was a leading philosophical figure of the Dutch Golden Age. Spinoza's given name, which means "Blessed", varies among different languages. In Hebrew, it is written ברוך שפינוזה‬. His Portuguese name is Benedito "Bento" de Espinosa
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