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Carl Larsson
Carl Larsson
Carl Larsson
(28 May 1853 – 22 January 1919) was a Swedish painter representative of the Arts and Crafts movement. His many paintings include oils, watercolors, and frescoes. He considered his finest work to be Midvinterblot
Midvinterblot
(Midwinter Sacrifice), a large painting now displayed inside the Swedish National Museum of Fine Arts.Contents1 Biography 2 Paintings 3 Legacy 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit]Self-Portrait in the new studioLarsson was born on 28 May 1853 in the old town of Stockholm, at 78 Prästgatan.[1] His parents were extremely poor, and his childhood was not happy. Renate Puvogel, in her book Larsson, gives detailed information about Carl's life: "His mother was thrown out of the house, together with Carl and his brother Johan; after enduring a series of temporary dwellings, the family moved into Grev Magnigränd No. 7 (later No
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Anders Zorn
Anders Leonard Zorn (Swedish pronunciation: [ˌanˈdæʂ ˈsoːɳ] ( listen); 18 February 1860 – 22 August 1920) was one of Sweden's foremost artists. He obtained international success as a painter, sculptor, and etcher.[1][2] Among Zorn's portrait subjects were King Oscar II
Oscar II
of Sweden, and three American Presidents, Grover Cleveland, William H
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Yule
Yule
Yule
or Yuletide (" Yule
Yule
time") was and is a festival observed by the historical Germanic peoples. Scholars have connected the celebration to the Wild Hunt, the god Odin, and the pagan Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
Mōdraniht. It later underwent Christianized reformulation resulting in the term Christmastide. Terms with an etymological equivalent to Yule
Yule
are used in the Nordic countries for Christmas
Christmas
with its religious rites, but also for the holidays of this season. Today Yule
Yule
is also used to a lesser extent in the English-speaking world as a synonym for Christmas. Present-day Christmas
Christmas
customs and traditions such as the Yule
Yule
log, Yule
Yule
goat, Yule boar, Yule
Yule
singing, and others stem from pagan Yule
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Blót
Blót
Blót
is the term for "sacrifice" in Norse paganism. A blót could be dedicated to any of the Norse gods, the spirits of the land, and to ancestors
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Temple Of Uppsala
The Temple at Uppsala was a religious center in the ancient Norse religion once located at what is now Gamla Uppsala (Swedish "Old Uppsala"), Sweden attested in Adam of Bremen's 11th-century work Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum and in Heimskringla, written by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century. Theories have been proposed about the implications of the descriptions of the temple and the findings (or lack thereof) of the archaeological excavations in the area, along with recent findings of extensive wooden structures and log lines that may have played a supporting role to activities at the site, including ritual sacrifice.Contents1 Adam of Bremen 2 Heimskringla 3 Archaeological record 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesAdam of Bremen[edit] In Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, Adam of Bremen provides a description of the temple. Adam records that a "very famous temple called Ubsola" exists in a town close to Sigtuna
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Windowsill
A window sill (also written as windowsill or window-sill) is the surface at the bottom of a window. They are not up top. A dictionary of architecture categorically defined the characteristics of a windowsill as:The lowest form of window casement. Windowsills hold pieces in place and slope downward to drain water. In a well hung window, the lower sash rests on the chin; The horizontal piece below a window unit in masonry construction or in wood framing. The window sill of the window frame sits on the window sill of the wall opening;[1] The lowermost, interior trim work on a window; Meets the dictionary definition of a shelf "A flat, usually rectangular structure composed of a rigid material, such as wood, glass, or metal, fixed at right angles to a wall or other vertical surface and used to hold or store objects." [2]See also[edit]Window#TermsReferences[edit]^ Sturgis, Russell. A dictionary of architecture and building: biographical, historical, and descriptive , vol.3
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Studio
A studio is an artist or worker's workroom. This can be for the purpose of acting, architecture, painting, pottery (ceramics), sculpture, origami, woodworking, scrapbooking, photography, graphic design, filmmaking, animation, industrial design, radio or television production broadcasting or the making of music. The term is also used for the workroom of dancers, often specified to dance studio. The word studio is derived from the Italian: studio, from Latin: studium, from studere, meaning to study or zeal. The French term for studio, atelier, in addition to designating an artist's studio is used to characterize the studio of a fashion designer
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Michelle Facos
Michelle Facos (born February 25, 1955) is an American art historian, Professor of Art History at Indiana University, Bloomington.Contents1 Early life 2 Academic career 3 Business career 4 Honors and awards 5 Books 6 External links 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] A native of Buffalo, NY, Facos graduated from Kirkland (Hamilton) College in 1976 with a B.A. in art history and comparative literature. Upon graduation, she worked as a paralegal in New York City at Debevoise & Plimpton and White & Case.[1] Academic career[edit] After working as a paralegal, Facos continued her art historical studies at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts, where she studied under H.W
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Watercolour
Watercolor (American English) or watercolour (British English; see spelling differences), also aquarelle (French, diminutive of Latin aqua "water"), is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork. Aquarelles painted with water-soluble colored ink instead of modern water colors are called "aquarellum atramento" ( Latin
Latin
for "aquarelle made with ink") by experts. However, this term has been more and more passing out of use.[1][2] The traditional and most common support—material to which the paint is applied—for watercolor paintings is paper. Other supports include papyrus, bark papers, plastics, vellum, leather, fabric, wood and canvas
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Distributed Proofreaders Canada
Distributed Proofreaders
Distributed Proofreaders
Canada (DP Canada) is a volunteer organization that converts books into digital format and releases them as public domain books in formats readable by electronic devices. It was launched in December 2007 and as of 2016[update] has published about 2,500 books. Books that are released are stored on a book archive called Faded Page. While its focus is on Canadian publications and preserving Canadiana, it also includes books from other countries as well
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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