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Carl Chun
Carl Chun' (October 1, 1852 – April 11, 1914) was a German marine biologist. Chun was born in Höchst, today a part of Frankfurt, and studied zoology at the University of Leipzig, where from 1878 to 1883 he was privat-docent of zoology and an assistant to Rudolf Leuckart. After professorial posts in Königsberg
Königsberg
(1883-1891) and Breslau
Breslau
(1891-1898), he returned to Leipzig
Leipzig
as a professor of zoology.[1] He initiated and led the German deep sea expedition (1898/99 "Valdivia" Expedition),[1] which set out on August 1, 1898 from Hamburg
Hamburg
to explore the deep sea in the subantarctic seas. They visited Bouvetøya, the Kerguelen Islands, and other islands in the area, before returning to Hamburg, where they arrived on April 30, 1899. Chun was a specialist on cephalopods and plankton
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Antarctic
The Antarctic
Antarctic
(US English /æntˈɑːrktɪk/, UK English /ænˈtɑːrktɪk/ or /æntˈɑːrtɪk/ and /ænˈtɑːrtɪk/ or /ænˈɑːrtɪk/)[Note 1] is a polar region around the Earth's South Pole, opposite the Arctic
Arctic
region around the North Pole. The Antarctic comprises the continent of Antarctica
Antarctica
and the island territories located on the Antarctic
Antarctic
Plate. The Antarctic
Antarctic
region include the ice shelves, waters, and island territories in the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
situated south of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Convergence, a zone approximately 32 to 48 km (20 to 30 mi) wide varying in latitude seasonally.[4] The region covers some 20 percent of the Southern Hemisphere, of which 5.5 percent (14 million km2) is the surface area of the Antarctic continent itself
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Jena
Jena
Jena
(German pronunciation: [ˈjeːna] ( listen)) is a German university city and the second largest city in Thuringia. Together with the nearby cities of Erfurt
Erfurt
and Weimar, it forms the central metropolitan area of Thuringia
Thuringia
with approximately 500,000 inhabitants, while the city itself has a population of about 110,000. Jena
Jena
is a centre of education and research; the Friedrich Schiller University was founded in 1558 and has 21,000 students today and the Ernst-Abbe- Fachhochschule Jena
Jena
counts another 5,000 students. Furthermore, there are many institutes of the leading German research societies. Jena
Jena
was first mentioned in 1182 and stayed a small town until the 19th century, when industry developed
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Leipzig
Leipzig
Leipzig
(/ˈlaɪpsɪɡ/; German: [ˈlaɪptsɪç]) is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. With a population of 582,277 inhabitants[3] (1.1 million[4] residents in the larger urban zone)[1] it is Germany's tenth most populous city.[5][6] Leipzig
Leipzig
is located about 160 kilometres (99 mi) southwest of Berlin
Berlin
at the confluence of the White Elster, Pleisse, and Parthe
Parthe
rivers at the southern end of the North German Plain. Leipzig
Leipzig
has been a trade city since at least the time of the Holy Roman Empire.[7] The city sits at the intersection of the Via Regia and Via Imperii, two important medieval trade routes
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Plankton
Plankton
Plankton
(singular plankter) are the diverse collection of organisms that live in large bodies of water and are unable to swim against a current.[1] They provide a crucial source of food to many large aquatic organisms, such as fish and whales. These organisms include bacteria, archaea, algae, protozoa and drifting or floating animals that inhabit—for example—the pelagic zone of oceans, seas, or bodies of fresh water
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Cephalopod
A cephalopod (/ˈsɛfələpɒd, ˈkɛf-/) is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda (Greek plural κεφαλόποδα, kephalópoda; "head-feet") such as a squid, octopus or nautilus. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles (muscular hydrostats) modified from the primitive molluscan foot. Fishermen sometimes call them inkfish, referring to their common ability to squirt ink. The study of cephalopods is a branch of malacology known as teuthology. Cephalopods became dominant during the Ordovician
Ordovician
period, represented by primitive nautiloids. The class now contains two, only distantly related, extant subclasses: Coleoidea, which includes octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish; and Nautiloidea, represented by Nautilus
Nautilus
and Allonautilus
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Kerguelen Islands
The Kerguelen Islands
Kerguelen Islands
(/kərˈɡeɪlən/ or /ˈkɜːrɡələn/;[2] in French commonly Îles Kerguelen but officially Archipel des Kerguelen, pronounced [kɛʁɡelɛn]), also known as the Desolation Islands (Îles de la Désolation in French), are a group of islands in the southern Indian Ocean constituting one of the two exposed parts of the mostly submerged Kerguelen Plateau. They are among the most isolated places on Earth, located 450 km (280 mi) northwest of the uninhabited Heard Island and McDonald Islands
Heard Island and McDonald Islands
and more than 3,300 km (2,100 mi) from Madagascar, the nearest populated location (excluding the Alfred Faure
Alfred Faure
scientific station in Île de la Possession, about 1,340 km (830 mi) from there, and the non-permanent station located in Île Amsterdam, 1,440 km (890 mi) away)
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Biologist
A biologist, is a scientist who has specialized knowledge in the field of biology, the scientific study of life.[2] Biologists involved in fundamental research attempt to explore and further explain the underlying mechanisms that govern the functioning of living matter. Biologists involved in applied research attempt to develop or improve more specific processes and understanding, in fields such as medicine and industry. While the term biologist can apply to any scientist studying biology, most biologists research and specialise in specific fields. In this way, biologists investigate large-scale organism interactions, whole multicellular organisms, organs, tissues, cells, and micro-scale molecular processes
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Breslau
Wrocław
Wrocław
(/ˈvrɔːtslɑːf/;[2] Polish: [ˈvrɔt͡swaf] ( listen); German: Breslau, pronounced [ˈbʁɛslaʊ̯]; Czech: Vratislav; Latin: Vratislavia) is the largest city in western Poland. It lies on the banks of the River Oder
Oder
in the Silesian Lowlands
Silesian Lowlands
of Central Europe, roughly 350 kilometres (220 mi) from the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
to the north and 40 kilometres (25 mi) from the Sudeten Mountains to the south. The population of Wrocław
Wrocław
in 2017 was 638,364, making it the fourth-largest city in Poland
Poland
and the main city of Wrocław agglomeration. Wrocław
Wrocław
is the historical capital of Silesia
Silesia
and Lower Silesia. Today, it is the capital of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship
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Königsberg
Königsberg
Königsberg
(/ˈkɜːrnɪɡzˌbɜːrɡ/; German pronunciation: [ˈkøːnɪçsˌbɛɐ̯k]) is the name for a former German city that is now Kaliningrad, Russia. Originally a Sambian
Sambian
or Old Prussian
Old Prussian
city, it later belonged to the monastic state of the Teutonic Knights, the Duchy of Prussia, the Kingdom of Prussia, the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
and Germany
Germany
until 1946. After being largely destroyed in World War II
World War II
by Allied bombing and Soviet forces and annexed by the Soviet Union thereafter, the city was renamed Kaliningrad. Few traces of the former Königsberg
Königsberg
remain today. The literal meaning of Königsberg
Königsberg
is 'King’s Mountain'
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