HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Cardinal Mazarin
Cardinal Jules Raymond Mazarin, 1st Duke of Rethel, Mayenne and Nevers (French: [ʒyl mazaʁɛ̃]; 14 July 1602 – 9 March 1661), born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino [ˈdʒuːljo raiˈmondo madːzaˈriːno] or Mazarino,[1] was an Italian cardinal, diplomat, and politician, who served as the Chief Minister to the kings of France Louis XIII
Louis XIII
and Louis XIV
Louis XIV
from 1642 until his death. Mazarin succeeded his mentor, Cardinal Richelieu
[...More...]

Mazarin (album)
Mazarin is studio album by Swedish pop musician Per Gessle, released on June 16, 2003. Per Gessle
Per Gessle
thought of this album as his little side project but it turned out to be a huge success, gaining five × platinum status in his home country
[...More...]

picture info

Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
[...More...]

picture info

Roman Catholic
Relations with:Islam Judaism PandeismLinks and resources Index Outline Glossary Category Media Templates WikiProject Book Pope portal Vatican City portal Catholicism portalvte The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017[update].[4] As the world's "oldest continuously functioning international institution",[5] it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[6] The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome
Rome
in Italy. Catholic theology
Catholic theology
is based on the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

picture info

Pope Urban VIII
Pope
Pope
Urban VIII (Latin: Urbanus VIII; baptised 5 April 1568 – 29 July 1644), reigned as Pope
Pope
from 6 August 1623 to his death in 1644. He expanded the papal territory by force of arms and advantageous politicking, and was also a prominent patron of the arts and a reformer of Church missions. However, the massive debts incurred during his pontificate greatly weakened his successors, who were unable to maintain the papacy's longstanding political and military influence in Europe. He was also involved in a controversy with Galileo
Galileo
and his theory on heliocentrism during his reign. No pope since has taken the name Urban.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life2 Papacy2.1 Politics 2.2 Patron of the arts 2.3 Later life 2.4 Death and legacy3 Private revelation 4 Portrayals in fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit]C
[...More...]

Chief Minister
A chief minister is the elected head of government of a sub-national entity, for instance a administrative subdivision or federal constituent entity. Examples include a state (and sometimes a union territory) in India; a territory of Australia;[1] a province of Sri Lanka or Pakistan; a federal state in Nepal; a autonomous region of Philippines;[2] or a British Overseas Territory
British Overseas Territory
that has attained self-governance
[...More...]

picture info

His Eminence
His Eminence
His Eminence
(abbreviation "H.Em.", oral address Your Eminence or Most Reverend Eminence) is a historical style of reference for high nobility, still in use in various religious contexts.Contents1 Catholicism 2 Eastern Orthodox Church 3 Oriental Orthodoxy 4 Other religions 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCatholicism[edit] The style remains in use as the official style or standard of address in reference to a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, reflecting his status as a Prince of the Church. A long
[...More...]

picture info

Kings Of France
The monarchs of the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
and its predecessors (and successor monarchies) ruled from the establishment of the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
in 486 until the fall of the Second French Empire
Second French Empire
in 1870, with several interruptions. Sometimes included as "Kings of France"[1] are the kings of the Franks of the Merovingian dynasty, which ruled from 486 until 751,[2] and of the Carolingians, who ruled until 987 (with some interruptions). The Capetian dynasty, the male-line descendants of Hugh Capet, included the first rulers to adopt the title of "King of France" for the first time with Philip II (r. 1180–1223). The Capetians ruled continuously from 987 to 1792 and again from 1814 to 1848
[...More...]

picture info

Diocese Of Metz
The Roman Catholic Diocese
Diocese
of Metz
Metz
(Latin: Dioecesis Metensis; French: Diocèse de Metz) is a diocese of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Roman Catholic Church in France. In the Middle Ages it was in effect an independent state (prince-bishopric), part of the Holy Roman Empire, ruled by the prince-bishop who had the ex officio title of count. It was annexed to France
France
by King Henry II in 1552; this was recognized by the Holy Roman Empire in the Peace of Westphalia
Peace of Westphalia
of 1648. It then was part of the province of the Three Bishoprics
[...More...]

picture info

Exemption (church)
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


[...More...]

picture info

Roman Catholic Diocese Of Metz
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

picture info

Politician
A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. In democratic countries, politicians seek elective positions within a government through elections or, at times, temporary appointment to replace politicians who have died, resigned or have been otherwise removed from office. In non-democratic countries, they employ other means of reaching power through appointment, bribery, revolutions and intrigues. Some politicians are experienced in the art or science of government.[1] Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people
[...More...]

picture info

Clergyman
Clergy
Clergy
are some of the main and important formal leaders within certain religions. The roles and functions of clergy vary in different religious traditions but these usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their religion's doctrines and practices. Some of the terms used for individual clergy are clergyman, clergywoman and churchman. Less common terms are churchwoman, clergyperson and cleric. In Christianity
Christianity
the specific names and roles of clergy vary by denomination and there is a wide range of formal and informal clergy positions, including deacons, elders, priests, bishops, preachers, pastors, ministers and the Pope
[...More...]

picture info

Roman College
The Roman College
Roman College
(Italian: Collegio Romano) was a school established by St. Ignatius of Loyola
Ignatius of Loyola
in 1551, just 17 years after he founded the Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(1534). It quickly grew to include classes from elementary school through university level. It moved to several different locations to accommodate its growing student population. With the patronage of Pope Gregory XIII, from 1582 to 1584 the final seat of the Roman College
Roman College
was built near the center of Rome's most historic Pigna district, on what today is called Piazza del Collegio Romano
[...More...]

picture info

French Nationality Law
French nationality law
French nationality law
is historically based on the principles of jus soli (Latin for "right of soil"), according to Ernest Renan's definition, in opposition to the German definition of nationality, jus sanguinis (Latin for "right of blood"), formalized by Johann Gottlieb Fichte. The 1993 Méhaignerie Law required children born in France
France
of foreign parents to request French nationality at adulthood, rather than being automatically accorded citizenship. This "manifestation of will" requirement was subsequently abrogated by the Guigou Law of 1998,[1] but children born in France
France
of foreign parents remain foreign until obtaining legal majority. Children born in France
France
to tourists or other short-term visitors do not acquire French citizenship by virtue of birth in France: residency must be proven
[...More...]

picture info

Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
[...More...]

.