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Capulet
Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
contains a diverse cast of characters. In addition to play's eponymous protagonists, Romeo
Romeo
Montague and Juliet
Juliet
Capulet, the play contains roles for members of their respective families and households; Prince Escalus, the city's ruler, and his kinsman, Count Paris; and various unaffiliated characters such as Friar Laurence
Friar Laurence
and the Chorus
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Eponym
An eponym is a person, place, or thing after whom or after which something is named, or believed to be named. The adjectives derived from eponym include eponymous and eponymic. For example, Elizabeth I of England is the eponym of the Elizabethan era, and "the eponymous founder of the Ford Motor Company" refers to Henry Ford
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Aristocracy
Aristocracy (Greek ἀριστοκρατία aristokratía, from ἄριστος aristos "excellent", and κράτος kratos "power") is a form of government that places power in the hands of a small, privileged ruling class.[1] The term derives from the Greek aristokratia, meaning "rule of the best".[2] The term is synonymous with hereditary government, and hereditary succession is its primary philosophy, after which the hereditary monarch appoints officers as they see fit. At the time of the word's origins in ancient Greece, the Greeks conceived it as rule by the best qualified citizens—and often contrasted it favourably with monarchy, rule by an individual
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Confidant
The confidant (/ˈkɒnfɪdænt/ or /ˌkɒnfɪˈdɑːnt/; feminine: confidante, same pronunciation) is a character in a story that a protagonist confides in and trusts
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Antagonist
An antagonist is a character, group of characters, institution or concept that stands in or represents opposition against which the protagonist(s) must contend. In other words, an antagonist is a person or a group of people who opposes a protagonist.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Types2.1 Heroes and villains 2.2 Other characters 2.3 Aspects of the protagonist 2.4 Non-personal3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English word antagonist comes from the Greek ἀνταγωνιστής – antagonistēs, "opponent, competitor, villain, enemy, rival," which is derived from anti- ("against") and agonizesthai ("to contend for a prize").[2][3]. Types[edit] Heroes and villains[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Cazzo
Italian profanity (bestemmie when referred to religious topics, parolacce when not) refers to a set of words considered blasphemous or inflammatory in the Italian language. The Italian language is considered a language with a large set of inflammatory terms and phrases, almost all of which originate from the several dialects and languages of Italy, such as the Tuscan dialect, which had a very strong influence in modern standard Italian, which is widely known to be based on Florentine language.[1] Several of these words have cognates in other Romance languages, such as Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian and French. Profanities differ from region to region, but a number of them are diffuse enough to be more closely associated to the Italian language and featured in all the more popular Italian dictionaries.Contents1 List of profanities in the Italian language 2 Profanity in literature 3 Blasphemous profanity3.1 Gravity 3.2 Legal status 3.3 Minced oaths4 See also 5
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Wet Nurse
A wet nurse is a woman who breast feeds and cares for another's child.[1] Wet nurses are employed when the mother is unable or elects not to nurse the child herself. Wet-nursed children may be known as "milk-siblings", and in some cultures the families are linked by a special relationship of milk kinship. Mothers who nurse each other's babies are engaging in a reciprocal act known as cross-nursing or co-nursing.Contents1 Reasons 2 Eliciting milk 3 Historical and cultural practices3.1 Mythology 3.2 Ancient Rome 3.3 England 3.4 France 3.5 United States4 Relationships 5 Current attitudes in Western countries 6 Current situation elsewhere 7 Notable wetnurses 8 See also 9 ReferencesReasons[edit] A wet nurse can help when a mother is unable or unwilling to feed her baby
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Comic Relief
Comic
Comic
relief is the inclusion of a humorous character, scene, or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension.Contents1 Definition 2 Use 3 Examples 4 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Comic
Comic
relief usually means a releasing of emotional or other tension resulting from a comic episode interposed in the midst of serious or tragic elements in a drama. Comic
Comic
relief often takes the form of a bumbling, wisecracking sidekick of the hero or villain in a work of fiction. A sidekick used for comic relief will usually comment on the absurdity of the hero's situation and make comments that would be inappropriate for a character who is to be taken seriously. Other characters may use comic relief as a means to irritate others or keep themselves confident. Use[edit] Sometimes comic relief characters will appear in fiction that is comic
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Stychomythia
Stichomythia (Greek: Στιχομυθία) is a technique in verse drama in which sequences of single alternating lines, or half-lines (hemistichomythia[1]) or two-line speeches (distichomythia[2]) are given to alternating characters. It typically features repetition and antithesis.[3] The term originated in the theatre of Ancient Greece, though many dramatists since have used the technique. Etymologically it derives from the Greek stikhos ("row, line of verse") + muthos ("speech, talk").[4] Stichomythia is particularly well suited to sections of dramatic dialogue where two characters are in violent dispute
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Ford Madox Brown
Ford Madox Brown
Ford Madox Brown
(16 April 1821 – 6 October 1893) was a French-born British painter of moral and historical subjects, notable for his distinctively graphic and often Hogarthian version of the Pre-Raphaelite
Pre-Raphaelite
style. Arguably, his most notable painting was Work (1852–65). Brown spent the latter years of his life painting the Manchester
Manchester
Murals, depicting Mancunian history, for Manchester
Manchester
Town Hall.Contents1 Early life 2 Works 3 Family 4 Heritage 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Brown, at left, with William Holman Hunt. Caricature
Caricature
by Max Beerbohm from Rossetti and His Circle.Brown was the grandson of the medical theorist John Brown, founder of the Brunonian system of medicine. His great grandfather was a Scottish labourer
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Unrequited Love
Unrequited love
Unrequited love
or one-sided love is love that is not openly reciprocated or understood as such by the beloved. The beloved may not be aware of the admirer's deep and strong romantic affection, or may consciously reject it
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Apothecary
Apothecary
Apothecary
/əˈpɒθɪkəri/ is one term for a medical professional who formulates and dispenses materia medica to physicians, surgeons, and patients. The modern pharmacist (also colloquially referred to as a chemist in British English) has taken over this role. In some languages and regions, the word "apothecary" is still used to refer to a retail pharmacy or a pharmacist who owns one
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Early Texts Of Shakespeare's Works
The earliest texts of William Shakespeare's works were published during the 16th and 17th centuries in quarto or folio format. Folios are large, tall volumes; quartos are smaller, roughly half the size. The publications of the latter are usually abbreviated to Q1, Q2, etc., where the letter stands for "quarto" and the number for the first, second, or third edition published.Contents1 Quartos 2 Folios 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksQuartos[edit] Main article: List of Shakespeare plays in quarto Eighteen of the 36 plays in the First Folio
First Folio
were printed in separate and individual editions prior to 1623. Pericles (1609) and The Two Noble Kinsmen (1634) also appeared separately before their inclusions in folio collections (the Shakespeare Third Folio
Folio
and the second Beaumont and Fletcher folio, respectively)
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Henry William Bunbury
Henry William Bunbury (1750 – 7 May 1811) was an English caricaturist. The second son of Sir William Bunbury, 5th Baronet (see Bunbury baronets), of Mildenhall, Suffolk, he came of an old Norman family. He was educated at Westminster School and St Catharine's College, Cambridge, and soon showed a talent for drawing, especially for humorous subjects.[1] His more serious efforts were no great success, but his caricatures are as famous as those of his contemporaries Thomas Rowlandson and James Gillray, good examples being his Country Club (1788), Barber's Shop (1803) and A Long Story (1782)
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Foreshadowing
Foreshadowing is a literary device in which a writer gives an advance hint of what is to come later in the story. Foreshadowing often appears at the beginning of a story, or a chapter, and it helps the reader develop expectations about the upcoming events. A writer may implement foreshadowing in many different ways. Some of these ways include: character dialogues, plot events, and changes in setting. Even the title of a work or a chapter can act as a clue that suggests what is going to happen. Foreshadowing in fiction creates an atmosphere of suspense in a story, so that the readers are interested to know more. This literary device is generally used is to build anticipation in the minds of readers about what might happen next, thus adding dramatic tension to a story. Moreover, foreshadowing can make extraordinary and bizarre events appear credible, as the events are predicted beforehand so that readers are mentally prepared for them
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Monologue
In theatre, a monologue (from Greek: μονόλογος, from μόνος mónos, "alone, solitary" and λόγος lógos, "speech") is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their mental thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience. Monologues are common across the range of dramatic media (plays, films,[1] etc.), as well as in non-dramatic media such as poetry.[2] Monologues share much in common with several other literary devices including soliloquies, apostrophes, and aside
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