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Capitolium
The Capitoline Triad
Capitoline Triad
was a group of three deities who were worshipped in ancient Roman religion in an elaborate temple on Rome's Capitoline Hill ( Latin
Latin
Capitolium). Two distinct Capitoline Triads were worshipped at various times in Rome's history, both originating in ancient traditions predating the Roman Republic. The one most commonly referred to as the "Capitoline Triad" is the more recent of the two, consisting of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. The earlier triad, sometimes referred to in modern scholarship as the Archaic Triad, consisted of Jupiter, Mars and Quirinus
Quirinus
and was Indo-European in origin
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Raja
Raja
Raja
(/ˈrɑːdʒɑː/; also spelled rajah, from Sanskrit राजन् rājan-), is a title for a monarch or princely ruler in South and Southeast Asia
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Flamen Quirinalis
Religion in ancient Rome Imperial cult Glossary of ancient Roman religion Gallo-Roman religionv t eIn ancient Roman religion, the Flamen
Flamen
Quirinalis was the flamen devoted to the cult of god Quirinus. He was one of the three flamines maiores, third in order of importance after the Flamen
Flamen
Dialis and the Flamen
Flamen
Martialis. As the other ones he had to reside in Rome and was not allowed to leave the city for any reason. The theology of Quirinus
Quirinus
is complex and difficult to interpret
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Roman Kingdom
The Roman Kingdom, or regal period, was the period of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by a monarchical form of government of the city of Rome
Rome
and its territories. Little is certain about the history of the kingdom, as nearly no written records from that time survive, and the histories about it that were written during the Republic and Empire are largely based on legends
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Tetrastyle
A portico (from Italian) is a porch leading to the entrance of a building, or extended as a colonnade, with a roof structure over a walkway, supported by columns or enclosed by walls. This idea was widely used in Ancient Greece and has influenced many cultures, including most Western cultures. Some noteworthy examples of porticos are the East Portico of the United States Capitol, the portico adorning the Pantheon in Rome and the portico of University College London. Porticos are sometimes topped with pediments. Palladio was a pioneer of using temple-fronts for secular buildings. In the UK, the temple-front applied to The Vyne, Hampshire, was the first portico applied to an English country house. A pronaos (UK: /proʊˈneɪ.ɒs/ or US: /proʊˈneɪ.əs/) is the inner area of the portico of a Greek or Roman temple, situated between the portico's colonnade or walls and the entrance to the cella, or shrine
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Pronaos
A portico (from Italian) is a porch leading to the entrance of a building, or extended as a colonnade, with a roof structure over a walkway, supported by columns or enclosed by walls. This idea was widely used in Ancient Greece and has influenced many cultures, including most Western cultures. Some noteworthy examples of porticos are the East Portico of the United States Capitol, the portico adorning the Pantheon in Rome and the portico of University College London. Porticos are sometimes topped with pediments. Palladio was a pioneer of using temple-fronts for secular buildings. In the UK, the temple-front applied to The Vyne, Hampshire, was the first portico applied to an English country house. A pronaos (UK: /proʊˈneɪ.ɒs/ or US: /proʊˈneɪ.əs/) is the inner area of the portico of a Greek or Roman temple, situated between the portico's colonnade or walls and the entrance to the cella, or shrine
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Sacellum
In ancient Roman religion, a sacellum is a small shrine. The word is a diminutive from sacer ("belonging to a god").[1] The numerous sacella of ancient Rome included both shrines maintained on private properties by families, and public shrines. A sacellum might be square or round.[2] Varro
Varro
and Verrius Flaccus
Verrius Flaccus
describe sacella in ways that at first seem contradictory, the former defining a sacellum in its entirety as equivalent to a cella,[3] which is specifically an enclosed space, and the latter insisting that a sacellum had no roof.[4] "Enclosure," however, is the shared characteristic, roofed over or not
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Quirinal Hill
The Quirinal Hill
Quirinal Hill
(/ˈkwɪrɪnəl/; Latin: Collis Quirinalis; Italian: Quirinale [kwiriˈnaːle]) is one of the Seven Hills of Rome, at the north-east of the city center. It is the location of the official residence of the Italian head of state, who resides in the Quirinal Palace; by metonymy "the Quirinal" has come to stand for the Italian president. The Quirinal Palace
Quirinal Palace
has an extension of 1.2 million square feet.Piazza del Quirinale panoramaContents1 History 2 Palazzo
Palazzo
del Quirinale 3 Other monuments 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] It was originally part of a group of hills that included Collis Latiaris, Mucialis (or Sanqualis), Salutaris
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Martial
Marcus Valerius Martialis (known in English as Martial /ˈmɑːrʃəl/) (March, between 38 and 41 AD – between 102 and 104 AD) was a Roman poet from Hispania
Hispania
(modern Spain) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome
Rome
between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva
Nerva
and Trajan. In these short, witty poems he cheerfully satirises city life and the scandalous activities of his acquaintances, and romanticises his provincial upbringing
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Georg Wissowa
Georg Otto August Wissowa (17 June 1859 – 11 May 1931) was a German classical philologist born in Neudorf, near Breslau.Contents1 Education 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksEducation[edit] Wissowa studied classical philology under August Reifferscheid at the University of Breslau, then furthered his studies in Munich under Heinrich Brunn, a leading authority on Roman antiquities. In 1890 he became a full professor at the University of Marburg, relocating to Halle in 1896 as a successor to Heinrich Keil.[1] Works[edit] Georg Wissowa is remembered today for re-edition of Realencyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft, an encyclopedia of classical studies initially started by August Friedrich Pauly
August Friedrich Pauly
(1796–1845) in 1837.[2][3] Around 1890, Wissowa began the new edition, an ambitious project that he anticipated would take ten years to finish
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Rex Sacrorum
Religion in ancient Rome Imperial cult Glossary of ancient Roman religion Gallo-Roman religionv t eIn ancient Roman religion, the rex sacrorum ("king of the sacred", also sometimes rex sacrificulus, "[one who makes] offerings made by the king") was a senatorial priesthood[1] reserved for patricians. Although in the historical era the pontifex maximus was the head of Roman state religion, Festus says[2] that in the ranking of the highest Roman priests (ordo sacerdotum), the rex sacrorum was of highest prestige, followed by the flamines maiores ( Flamen
Flamen
Dialis, Flamen
Flamen
Martialis, Flamen
Flamen
Quirinalis) and the pontifex maximus
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Flamen Dialis
Religion in ancient Rome Imperial cult Glossary of ancient Roman religion Gallo-Roman religionv t eIn ancient Roman religion, the Flamen
Flamen
Dialis was the high priest of Jupiter.[1] There were 15 flamines, of which three were flamines maiores, serving the three gods of the Archaic Triad. According to tradition the flamines were forbidden to touch metal, ride a horse, or see a corpse. The office of Flamen
Flamen
Dialis, and the offices of the other flamines maiores, were traditionally said to have been created by Numa Pompilius, second king of Rome, although Numa himself performed many of the rites of the Flamen
Flamen
Dialis.[2]Contents1 Privileges and honors 2 Restrictions 3 Flaminica Dialis 4 Holders of the office 5 ReferencesPrivileges and honors[edit] The Flamen
Flamen
Dialis enjoyed many peculiar honours
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Flamen Martialis
Religion in ancient Rome Imperial cult Glossary of ancient Roman religion Gallo-Roman religionv t eIn ancient Roman religion, a flamen was a priest assigned to one of fifteen deities with official cults during the Roman Republic. The most important three were the flamines maiores (or "major priests"), who served the three chief Roman gods of the Archaic Triad. The remaining twelve were the flamines minores ("lesser priests"). Two of the minores cultivated deities whose names are now unknown; among the others are deities about whom little is known other than the name. During the Imperial era, the cult of a deified emperor (divus) also had a flamen. The fifteen Republican flamens were part of the Pontifical College which administered state-sponsored religion
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Pontifex Maximus
The Pontifex Maximus
Pontifex Maximus
or pontifex maximus (Latin, "greatest priest"[1][2][3]) was the chief high priest of the College of Pontiffs (Collegium Pontificum) in ancient Rome. This was the most important position in the ancient Roman religion, open only to patricians until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. A distinctly religious office under the early Roman Republic, it gradually became politicized until, beginning with Augustus, it was subsumed into the Imperial office
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Aedes (Roman)
The vocabulary of ancient Roman religion was highly specialized. Its study affords important information about the religion, traditions and beliefs of the ancient Romans. This legacy is conspicuous in European cultural history in its influence on later juridical and religious vocabulary in Europe, particularly of the Western Church.[1] This glossary provides explanations of concepts as they were expressed in Latin pertaining to religious practices and beliefs, with links to articles on major topics such as priesthoods, forms of divination, and rituals. For theonyms, or the names and epithets of gods, see List of Roman deities. For public religious holidays, see Roman festivals. For temples see the List of Ancient Roman temples
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Iguvium
Gubbio is a town and comune in the far northeastern part of the Italian province of Perugia (Umbria). It is located on the lowest slope of Mt. Ingino, a small mountain of the Apennines.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Overview 2.2 Frazioni3 Main sights 4 Culture4.1 The Gubbio Layer 4.2 Gubbio in fiction 4.3 Other5 International relations5.1 Twin towns – Sister cities6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The city's origins are very ancient. The hills above the town were already occupied in the Bronze Age.[2] As Ikuvium, it was an important town of the Umbri in pre-Roman times, made famous for the discovery there of the Iguvine Tablets in 1444,[3] a set of bronze tablets that together constitute the largest surviving text in the Umbrian language
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