HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Capital Punishment In Japan
Capital punishment
Capital punishment
is a legal penalty in Japan. It is applied in practice only for murder, and executions are carried out by hanging. Death sentences are almost uniquely imposed in cases of multiple murders, though some single murderers have also been hanged in rare cases.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 System2.1 Sentencing guideline – Nagayama Standard 2.2 Judicial process 2.3 Stays of execution 2.4 Death row 2.5 Execution3 Death sentences for minors 4 Public debate4.1 Support 4.2 Criticism5 Executions 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Criminal punishment in Edo-period Japan Beginning in about the 4th century, Japan became increasingly influenced by the Chinese judicial system, and gradually adopted a system of different punishments for different crimes, including the death penalty
[...More...]

"Capital Punishment In Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokyo Detention House
The Tokyo
Tokyo
Detention House[1] (東京拘置所, Tōkyō Kōchisho) is a correctional facility in Katsushika, Tokyo.[2] A part of the penal system of Japan, it is operated by the Ministry of Justice. One of Japan's seven execution chambers is in this facility. Hanging is Japan's method of execution. The execution chamber in Tokyo
Tokyo
has a trap door. As the condemned dies, his or her body falls into a room below the execution chamber, and in that room the death is confirmed.[3] Before the condemned is executed, he or she passes a statue of Amida Nyorai (Amitābha), a Buddhist deity[4]. The execution room is in two sections, with both of them together the size of a 15 tatami mat room.[2] Notable prisoners[edit] Non-death row:Kakuei Tanaka[5]References[edit]^ "Penal Institutions in Japan." Ministry of Justice. Retrieved on August 27, 2010
[...More...]

"Tokyo Detention House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Seiken Sugiura
Seiken Sugiura (杉浦 正健 Sugiura Seiken, born July 26, 1934) is a Japanese politician and lawyer. He was named Minister of Justice[1] on October 31, 2005[2] and served in the cabinet of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. Being a Buddhist, he imposed a moratorium on executions during his time as Minister of Justice.[3] He was defeated in the 2009 election by Yasuhiro Nakane, a member of the Democratic Party of Japan. He has remained engaged in discussions over the death penalty in Japan
Japan
since leaving politics.[4] On October 3, 2015 he spoke at a World Day against the Death Penalty event in Tokyo, along with Hideo Hiraoka, who was justice minister under the Democratic Party of Japan.[5] References[edit]^ " Japan
Japan
Housewives May Judge Killers as Lawyers Condemn Hangings". Bloomberg. 23 August 2007
[...More...]

"Seiken Sugiura" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sendai
Sendai
Sendai
(仙台市, Sendai-shi, Japanese: [seꜜndai]) is the capital city of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, the largest city in the Tōhoku region, and the second largest city north of Tokyo. As of 1 August 2017[update], the city had a population of 1,086,012, and is one of Japan's 20 designated cities. The total area of the city is 786.30 square kilometres (303.59 sq mi). The city was founded in 1600 by the daimyō Date Masamune, and is nicknamed the City of Trees (杜の都, Mori no Miyako); there are about 60 zelkova trees on Jōzenji Street (定禅寺通, Jōzenji dōri) and Aoba Street (青葉通, Aoba dōri). In the summer, the Sendai
Sendai
Tanabata
Tanabata
Festival, the largest Tanabata festival in Japan, is held
[...More...]

"Sendai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Fukuoka
(福岡市, Fukuoka-shi, Japanese: [ɸɯ̥kɯꜜoka]) is the capital city of Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Prefecture, situated on the northern shore of Japanese island Kyushu. It is the most populous city on the island, followed by Kitakyushu. It is the largest city and metropolitan area west of Keihanshin. The city was designated on April 1, 1972, by government ordinance. Greater Fukuoka, with a population of 2.5 million people (2005 census), is part of the heavily industrialized Fukuoka– Kitakyushu
Kitakyushu
zone as well as Northern Kyushu. As of 2015[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
is Japan’s sixth largest city, having passed the population of Kobe.[1] As of July 2011[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
passed the population of Kyoto
[...More...]

"Fukuoka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hiroshima
Hiroshima
Hiroshima
(広島市, Hiroshima-shi, Japanese: [çiɾoɕima]) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture
Hiroshima Prefecture
and the largest city in the Chūgoku region
Chūgoku region
of western Honshu
Honshu
- the largest island of Japan. Hiroshima, a name meaning "Broad Island", gained city status on April 1, 1889. On April 1, 1980, Hiroshima
Hiroshima
became a designated city. As of August 2016[update], the city has an estimated population of 1,196,274
[...More...]

"Hiroshima" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sapporo
Sapporo
Sapporo
(札幌市, Sapporo-shi) is the fifth largest city of Japan
Japan
by population, and the largest city on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido
[...More...]

"Sapporo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Takamatsu, Kagawa
Takamatsu (高松市, Takamatsu-shi, Japanese: [takaꜜmatsɯ]) is a city located in central Kagawa Prefecture on the island of Shikoku in Japan, and is the capital city of the prefectural government. It is designated a core city by the Japanese Government. It is a port city located on the Seto Inland Sea, and is the closest port to Honshu from Shikoku island. For this reason it flourished under the daimyōs (feudal lords) as a castle town in the fiefdom of Takamatsu, during the Edo period. Takamatsu is a city with a large concentration of nationwide companies' branch offices, which play a large role in its economy, and it contains most of the national government's branch offices for Shikoku. The castle tower formerly used as the symbol of the city was destroyed during the Meiji period. In 2004, construction of the Symbol Tower, the new symbol of Takamatsu, was completed. The Symbol Tower is located in the Sunport area of the city
[...More...]

"Takamatsu, Kagawa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Convention On The Rights Of The Child
The United Nations
United Nations
Convention on the Rights of the Child
Convention on the Rights of the Child
(commonly abbreviated as the CRC or UNCRC) is a human rights treaty which sets out the civil, political, economic, social, health and cultural rights of children. The Convention defines a child as any human being under the age of eighteen, unless the age of majority is attained earlier under national legislation.[4] Nations that ratify this convention are bound to it by international law
[...More...]

"Convention On The Rights Of The Child" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Covenant On Civil And Political Rights
The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
(ICCPR) is a multilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly with resolution 2200A (XXI) on 19 December 1966, and in force from 23 March 1976 in accordance with Article 49 of the covenant. Article 49 allowed that the covenant will enter into force three months after the date of the deposit of the thirty-fifth instrument of ratification or accession
[...More...]

"International Covenant On Civil And Political Rights" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Misao Katagiri
The Zama and Shibuya shootings were the double spree shootings in Japan on July 29, 1965 by Misao Katagiri (片桐 操, Katagiri Misao, April 15, 1947 – July 21, 1972), which left one police officer dead and 17 people injured, at the conclusion of which he was captured by police officers. Katagiri was later executed.[1] Katagiri was born in Setagaya, Tokyo and reportedly loved guns. On July 29, 1965, he shot dead one policeman and injured another with a rifle in Zama, Kanagawa Prefecture. He stole a handgun and hijacked four cars. In Shibuya, Tokyo, he entered a gun shop near the Shibuya fire station and took four hostages, which resulted in a gun battle with the police. About 5,000 people, including Norio Nagayama, witnessed the gunfight, during which he injured 16 people.[2] One hostage attacked him and police officers eventually captured him. Katagiri was sentenced to death and was executed on July 21, 1972. References[edit]^ "Ano Shikeishū no Saigo no Shunkan" (in Japanese)
[...More...]

"Misao Katagiri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
[...More...]

"The Washington Post" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

UN Moratorium On The Death Penalty
At Italy's instigation, the UN moratorium on the death penalty resolution was presented by the EU in partnership with eight co-author member States to the General Assembly of the United Nations, calling for general suspension (not abolition) of capital punishment throughout the world. It was twice affirmed: first, on 15 November 2007 by the Third Committee, and then subsequently reaffirmed on 18 December by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 62/149. New Zealand played a central role facilitating agreement between the co-author group and other supporters. It calls on States that maintain the death penalty to establish a moratorium on the use of the death penalty with a view to abolition, and in the meantime, to restrict the number of offences which it punishes and to respect the rights of those on death row. It also calls on States that have abolished the death penalty not to reintroduce it
[...More...]

"UN Moratorium On The Death Penalty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pureland Buddhism
Pure Land Buddhism (Chinese: 淨土宗; pinyin: Jìngtǔzōng; Japanese: 浄土仏教 Jōdo bukkyō;[1] Korean: Hangul: 정토종; RR: Jeongto-jong; Vietnamese: Tịnh Độ Tông), also referred to as Amidism in English,[2][3] is a broad branch of Mahayana Buddhism and one of the most widely practiced traditions of Buddhism in East Asia. Pure Land is a tradition of Buddhist teachings that are focused on the Buddha Amitābha. The three primary texts of the tradition, known as the "Three Pure Land Sutras", are the Longer Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra (Infinite Life Sutra), Amitayurdhyana Sutra (Contemplation Sutra) and the Shorter Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra (Amitabha Sutra). Pure Land oriented practices and concepts are found within basic Mahāyāna Buddhist cosmology, and form an important component of the Mahāyāna Buddhist traditions of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Vietnam
[...More...]

"Pureland Buddhism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Osaka
Osaka
Osaka
(大阪市, Ōsaka-shi) (Japanese pronunciation: [oːsaka];  listen (help·info)) is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan. It is the capital city of Osaka Prefecture
Osaka Prefecture
and the largest component of the Keihanshin
Keihanshin
Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Japan
Japan
and among the largest in the world with over 19 million inhabitants
[...More...]

"Osaka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
[...More...]

"The Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.