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Cape Verde
Cape Verde
Cape Verde
(/ˌkeɪp ˈvɜːrd/) or Cabo Verde (/ˌkɑːboʊ ˈvɜːrdeɪ/, /ˌkæb-/) (Portuguese: Cabo Verde, pronounced [ˈkaβu ˈveɾðɨ]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Cabo Verde,[9] is an island country spanning an archipelago of 10 volcanic islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. It forms part of the Macaronesia
Macaronesia
Ecoregion, along with the Azores, Canary Islands, Madeira, and the Savage Isles. In ancient time these islands were referred to as "the Islands of the Blessed" or the "Fortunate Isles"
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Island Country
An island country is a country whose primary territory consists of one or more islands or parts of islands. As of 1996, 25.2% of all independent countries were island countries.[1][needs update]Contents1 Politics 2 War 3 Natural resources 4 Geography 5 Economics 6 Composition 7 See also 8 ReferencesPolitics[edit] The percentage of island countries that are democratic is higher than that of continental countries
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Purchasing Power Parity
Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) is a theory that allows economic variables (like GDP) from different places to be compared directly. It assumes a basket of goods at one location has the same value as a basket of those same goods at another location.[1] PPP is commonly used between countries, because their GDP is often in different currencies. While the currencies' exchange rate could be used to convert GDP, the exchange rate is only affected by the prices of traded goods and some goods, like housing, labor, and government services, are not traded. PPP factors are often presented as an exchange rate, being equal to the ratio of the price of the basket of goods in one country to the price of the basket of goods in the other country
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Human Development Index
The Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) is a statistic composite index of life expectancy, education, and per capita income indicators, which are used to rank countries into four tiers of human development. A country scores a higher HDI when the lifespan is higher, the education level is higher, and the gross national income GNI (PPP) per capita is higher
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; from Greek δῆμος, dêmos, "people, tribe" and όνομα, ónoma, "name") or gentilic (from Latin gentilis, "of a clan, or gens")[1] is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place and is usually derived from the name of the place.[2] Examples of demonyms include Cochabambino, for a person from the city of Cochabamba; American for a person from the country called the United States
United States
of America; and Swahili, for a person of the Swahili coast. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region. Thus a Thai may be any resident or citizen of Thailand
Thailand
of any ethnic group, or more narrowly a member of the Thai people. Conversely, some groups of people may be associated with multiple demonyms
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Ethnic Groups In Europe
The Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
of Europe
Europe
are the focus of European ethnology, the field of anthropology related to the various indigenous groups that reside in the nations of Europe. According to German monograph Minderheitenrechte in Europa co-edited by Pan and Pfeil (2002) there are 87 distinct peoples of Europe, of which 33 form the majority population in at least one sovereign state, while the remaining 54 constitute ethnic minorities. The total number of national or linguistic minority populations in Europe
Europe
is estimated at 105 million people, or 14% of 770 million Europeans.[1] There is no precise or universally accepted definition of the terms "ethnic group" or "nationality"
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Multi-party System
A multi-party system is a system in which multiple political parties across the political spectrum run for national election, and all have the capacity to gain control of government offices, separately or in coalition.[1] Apart from one-party-dominant and two-party systems, multi-party systems tend to be more common in parliamentary systems than presidential systems and far more common in countries that use proportional representation compared to countries that use first-past-the-post elections. First-past-the-post
First-past-the-post
requires concentrated areas of support for large representation in the legislature whereas proportional representation better reflects the range of a population's views. Proportional systems have multi-member districts with more than one representative elected from a given district to the same legislative body, and thus a greater number of viable parties
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Multiracial
Multiracial
Multiracial
is defined as made up of or relating to people of many races.[1] Many terms exist for people of various multiracial backgrounds. While some of the terms used in the past are considered insulting and offensive, there are many modern terms that multiracial people identify with. These include mixed-race (or simply "mixed"), biracial, multiracial, multiethnic, polyethnic, half, half-and-half, métis, creole, mestizo, mulatto, melungeon, criollo, chindian, dougla, quadroon, zambo, eurasian, hāfu, garifuna and pardo. Individuals of multiracial backgrounds make up a significant portion of the population in many parts of the world. In North America, studies have found that the multiracial population is continuing to grow. In many countries of Latin America
Latin America
and the Caribbean, mixed-race people make up the majority of the population
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Ethnic Groups
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
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Gross Domestic Product
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all the final goods and services produced in a specific time period, often annually.[2][3] GDP (nominal) per capita does not, however, reflect differences in the cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries; therefore using a basis of
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Republic
A republic (Latin: res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited, but are attained through democracy, oligarchy or autocracy
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Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Universal Time
(abbreviated to UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude,[1] and is not adjusted for daylight saving time
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn.[1] In effect, DST causes a lost hour of sleep in the spring and an extra hour of sleep in the fall.[2][3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
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ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions.Contents1 Parts 2 Editions 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency3.1 Members4 Current country codes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksParts[edit] It consists of three parts:[1]ISO 3166-1, Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
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Country Code Top-level Domain
A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is an Internet
Internet
top-level domain generally used or reserved for a country, sovereign state, or dependent territory identified with a country code. All ASCII
ASCII
ccTLD identifiers are two letters long, and all two-letter top-level domains are ccTLDs. In 2018, the Internet
Internet
Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) began implementing internationalized country code top-level domains, consisting of language-native characters when displayed in an end-user application
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Gini Coefficient
In economics, the Gini coefficient
Gini coefficient
(/ˈdʒiːni/ JEE-nee), sometimes called Gini index, or Gini ratio, is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income or wealth distribution of a nation's residents, and is the most commonly used measurement of inequality. It was developed by the Italian statistician and sociologist Corrado Gini and published in his 1912 paper Variability and Mutability (Italian: Variabilità e mutabilità).[1][2] The Gini coefficient
Gini coefficient
measures the inequality among values of a frequency distribution (for example, levels of income). A Gini coefficient of zero expresses perfect equality, where all values are the same (for example, where everyone has the same income)
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