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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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Frank Murphy
William Francis "Frank" Murphy (April 13, 1890 – July 19, 1949) was a Democratic politician and jurist from Michigan. He was named to the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
in 1940 after a political career that included stints as Governor of Michigan
Governor of Michigan
and Mayor of Detroit. He also served as the last Governor General of the Philippine Islands and the first High Commissioner of the Philippines. Born in Huron County, Michigan, Murphy graduated from the University of Michigan
Michigan
Law School in 1914. After serving in the United States Army during World War I, Murphy served as a federal attorney and trial judge
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Breach Of The Peace
Breach of the peace, or disturbing the peace, is a legal term used in constitutional law in English-speaking countries, and in a wider public order sense in the several jurisdictions of the United Kingdom. It is often considered a form of disorderly conduct.Contents1 Constitutional law 2 Public order2.1 England, Wales and Northern Ireland 2.2 Scotland 2.3 United States3 See also 4 ReferencesConstitutional law[edit] In the United States, the Speech or Debate Clause
Speech or Debate Clause
of Article One of the United States
United States
Constitution provides that members of Congress shall be immune from arrest in going to and departing from sessions and while Congress is in session except for cases of "Treason, Felony, and Breach of the Peace." The first two are somewhat self-explanatory; it has been suggested that the third is deliberately somewhat vague
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Common-law
Common law
Common law
(also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent. In cases where the parties disagree on what the law is, a common law court looks to past precedential decisions of relevant courts, and synthesizes the principles of those past cases as applicable to the current facts. If a similar dispute has been resolved in the past, the court is usually bound to follow the reasoning used in the prior decision (a principle known as stare decisis)
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United States Reports
The United States Reports
United States Reports
are the official record (law reports) of the rulings, orders, case tables (list of every case decided, in alphabetical order both by the name of the petitioner (the losing party in lower courts) and by the name of the respondent (the prevailing party below)), and other proceedings of the Supreme Court of the United States. United States Reports
United States Reports
are printed and bound and are the final version of court opinions and cannot be changed. Opinions of the court in each case, prepended with a headnote prepared by the Reporter of Decisions, and any concurring or dissenting opinions are published sequentially
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New Haven
New Haven
New Haven
(locally /nuː ˈheɪvən/ noo-HAY-vən)[2] is a coastal city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Connecticut. It is located on New Haven Harbor on the northern shore of Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
in New Haven
New Haven
County, Connecticut, and is part of the New York metropolitan area. With a population of 129,779 as determined by the 2010 United States Census,[3] it is the second-largest city in Connecticut
Connecticut
after Bridgeport
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Jehovah's Witnesses
Jehovah's Witnesses
Jehovah's Witnesses
is a millenarian restorationist Christian denomination with nontrinitarian beliefs distinct from mainstream Christianity.[4] The group reports a worldwide membership of more than 8.45 million adherents involved in evangelism and an annual Memorial attendance of more than 20 million.[3] Jehovah's Witnesses are directed by the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses, a group of elders in Warwick, New York, which establishes all doctrines[5] based on its interpretations of the Bible.[6][7] They believe that the destruction of the present world system at Armageddon is imminent
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Due Process Clause
The Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution each contain a due process clause
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Incorporation (Bill Of Rights)
Incorporation may refer to: Incorporation (business), the creation of a corporation Incorporation (association), giving legal form to an association by registering it as a corporation Incorporation of a place, creation of municipal corporation such as a city or county
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Fourteenth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments. The amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws and was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves following the American Civil War. The amendment was bitterly contested, particularly by the states of the defeated Confederacy, which were forced to ratify it in order to regain representation in Congress. The Fourteenth Amendment, particularly its first section, is one of the most litigated parts of the Constitution, forming the basis for landmark decisions such as Brown v. Board of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
(1954) regarding racial segregation, Roe v. Wade
Roe v. Wade
(1973) regarding abortion, Bush v. Gore
Bush v. Gore
(2000) regarding the 2000 presidential election, and Obergefell v. Hodges
Obergefell v

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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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United States Constitution
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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William O. Douglas
William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was an American jurist and politician who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Douglas was confirmed at the age of 40, one of the youngest justices appointed to the court. His term, lasting 36 years and 211 days (1939–75), is the longest in the history of the Supreme Court. In 1975 Time magazine called Douglas "the most doctrinaire and committed civil libertarian ever to sit on the court".[2] After an itinerant childhood, Douglas attended Whitman College
Whitman College
on a scholarship. He graduated from Columbia Law School
Columbia Law School
in 1925 and joined the Yale Law School
Yale Law School
faculty. After serving as the third chairman of the U.S
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