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Cantonese Opera
The Cantonese
Cantonese
opera (Chinese: 粵劇) is one of the major categories in Chinese opera, originating in southern China's Guangdong
Guangdong
Province. It is popular in Guangdong, Guangxi, Hong Kong, Macau
Macau
and among the Chinese community in Southeast Asia
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Mok Gar
Mok Gar
Mok Gar
(莫家) is one of the five major family styles of Southern Chinese martial arts. It was developed by a Shaolin monk named Monk Mok Ta Shi as an inheritance of the Southern Shaolin Fist in Guangdong province in China.[2] It gained fame three generations later, in the Qing Dynasty, with Mok Gin Kiu/Mo Qing Chiu/Mo Ching Chiao (莫清矯; also known as Mok Sau Cheung/ Mo Ta Chang) who learned the art from a monk named Wai Jen,[3][self-published source?] and also had supposedly learned from a famous kicker, Choy Kao Yee. Mok's reputation was so high after defeating many other boxers that the style, formerly known as Southern Shaolin Quan, was renamed for the Mok family (Mok Gar)
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Hong Kong Cinema
The cinema of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(Chinese: 香港電影) is one of the three major threads in the history of Chinese language
Chinese language
cinema, alongside the cinema of China, and the cinema of Taiwan. As a former British colony, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
had a greater degree of political and economic freedom than mainland China and Taiwan, and developed into a filmmaking hub for the Chinese-speaking world (including its worldwide diaspora), and for East Asia
East Asia
in general. For decades, Hong Kong
Hong Kong
was the third largest motion picture industry in the world (after Indian cinema
Indian cinema
and Hollywood) and the second largest exporter
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Cantonese Poetry
Cantonese
Cantonese
poetry ( Cantonese
Cantonese
Jyutping: Jyut6 si1; Traditional Chinese: 粵詩) is poetry performed and composed primarily by Cantonese people
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Cantonese Cuisine
Cantonese
Cantonese
cuisine (廣東菜), also known as Yue cuisine or Guangdong cuisine, refers to the cuisine of China's Guangdong
Guangdong
Province, particularly the provincial capital, Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(Canton).[1] It is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine
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Yum Cha
Yum cha
Yum cha
(simplified Chinese: 饮茶[1]; traditional Chinese: 飲茶; pinyin: yǐn chá; Jyutping: yam2 cha4; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale: yám chà; literally: "drink tea"), is the Cantonese
Cantonese
tradition of brunch involving Chinese tea
Chinese tea
and dim sum. The practice is popular in Cantonese-speaking regions in China, including the southern provinces of Guangdong
Guangdong
and Guangxi, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
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Dim Sum
Dim sum
Dim sum
/ˈdimˈsʌm/ (Chinese: 點心; pinyin: diǎnxīn; Cantonese Yale: dímsām) is a style of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
(particularly Cantonese but also other varieties) prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Dim sum dishes are usually served with tea and together form a full tea brunch. Dim sum
Dim sum
traditionally are served as fully cooked, ready-to-serve dishes. In Cantonese
Cantonese
teahouses, carts with dim sum will be served around the restaurant for diners to order from without leaving their seats
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Leung Cha
Chinese herb(al) tea or medicinal herbal tea ("Leung Cha" in Cantonese) is a kind of infusion made from purely Chinese medicinal herbs in Guangdong, China. It usually tastes bitter or lightly sweet and its colour is typically black or dark brown, depending on what kinds of herbs are used. Although it is referred to as "tea", it seldom contains any part of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) and is thus a herbal tea. Cantonese
Cantonese
people boil what are referred to as cooling herbs in Traditional Chinese medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
to make herbal tea, which is consumed in order to relieve the heat and humidity in the body. Therefore, Chinese herb tea is referred to as cold tea or cooling tea in the Chinese language. There are many kinds of cooling tea. Different kinds of tea are purported to cure or relieve a variety of diseases
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Tong Sui
Tong sui
Tong sui
literally translated as "sugar water", also known as tim tong, is a collective term for any sweet, warm soup or custard served as a dessert at the end of a meal in Cantonese
Cantonese
cuisine.[1] Tong sui are a Cantonese
Cantonese
specialty and are rarely found in other regional cuisines of China. Outside of Cantonese-speaking communities, soupy desserts generally are not recognized as a distinct category, and the term tong sui is not used. In Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Malaysia, there is a huge variety of tong sui, so huge to an extent that have led to stores specialised in selling these desserts
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Hung Ga
Luk Ah-Choi Wong Kei-Ying Wong Fei Hung
Wong Fei Hung
(son of Wong Kei-Ying) Tang Fung (student of Wong Fei Hung) Lam Sai Wing (student of Wong Fei Hung) Yao Loon Kwong (instructor of Leung Tin Jiu) Leung Tin Jiu (founder of Fut Gar) Lei Jou Fun (f
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Choy Gar
Choy Gar, also Caijia Quan (Chinese: 蔡家拳, Choy family fist) is a Chinese martial art
Chinese martial art
deriving its name from the Cantonese-born founder, Choy Gau Lee (蔡九儀) (Choy Tsing Hung) and is one of the five main family styles of Kung Fu
Kung Fu
in Southern China.[2] It was taught to him by a monk named, Yi Guan.[3] This style that was founded in the 17th century is a combination of rat and snake styles emphasizing on swift footwork and rapid strikes.[4]Contents1 The Style 2 Training 3 Some routines and theories 4 References 5 External linksThe Style[edit]Choy Gar being performed at an international event authorized by Chinese Wushu Association. Choy gar
Choy gar
is a self-defense style that practices low stances and swift footwork
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Wing Chun
Wing Chun
Wing Chun
(traditional Chinese: 詠春) is a traditional Southern Chinese Kung fu (wushu) specializing in close range combat.Contents1 Lexicology 2 Characteristics2.1 Positioning 2.2 Balance, body characteristics, and stance 2.3 Relaxation 2.4 Centerline 2.5 Punches 2.6 Kicks 2.7 Elbows and Knees 2.8 Uncommitted techniques 2.9 Trapping skills and sensitivity 2.10 Close range3 Curriculum3.1 Forms and San Sik3.1.1 Empty hand 3.1.2 Wooden dummy 3.1.3 Forms 3.1.4 Weapons3.2 Chi Sau 3.3 Chi Geuk 3.4 Muk Waan 3.5 Sparring4 Sash System 5 Southern martial arts 6 Global spread6.
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Guangdong Music (genre)
Guangdong
Guangdong
music, also known as Cantonese
Cantonese
music (廣東音樂 "Kwongdong yam ngok",Guǎngdōng yīnyuè) is a style of traditional Chinese instrumental music from Guangzhou
Guangzhou
and surrounding areas in Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
of Guangdong
Guangdong
Province on the southern coast of China. The name of the music is not an accurate description because Guangdong
Guangdong
music is not the only music of the whole Guangdong
Guangdong
area. Cantonese
Cantonese
classical music especially were usually much livelier in pace and happier than those of other China provinces which is typical and the very essence of the Cantonese's character. In Guangdong, there are numerous traditional genres of music such as Teochew music and Hakka music (Hakka Hanyue and sixian)
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Choy Li Fut
Choy Li Fut
Choy Li Fut
(Cantonese), also spelled Choy Lay Fut and Choy Lee Fut or Cai Li Fo (Mandarin) (Chinese: 蔡李佛; pinyin: Cài Lǐ Fó; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale: Choi3 Lei5 Fat6; aka Choy Lee Fut Kung Fu) is a
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Chow Gar
Chow Gar
Chow Gar
Tong Long (周家螳螂) is a southern Chinese martial art and is one of the four major schools in Southern Praying Mantis. It is an aggressive style with emphasis on close range fighting. These skills are developed by utilizing a range of training techniques which have been developed over several centuries. This style is not related to Jow-Ga Kung Fu(周家), a southern Chinese martial art founded by Jow Lung in the early 1900s.Contents1 History1.1 Chow Ah Naam 1.2 Wong Fook Go 1.3 Lau Soei (1866-1942) 1.4 Yip Shui (1912-2004)2 Forms 3 Techniques3.1 Basic Movements 3.2 Shock Power4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The history of Chow Gar
Chow Gar
Praying Mantis was transmitted orally with little supporting documentation until the 1900s
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