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Canon Powershot A
The Canon PowerShot
Canon PowerShot
A is a now discontinued series of digital cameras released by Canon. The A-series started as a budget line of cameras, although over time its feature set varied from low-end point-and-shoot cameras to high-end prosumer cameras capable of rivalling Canon's G-series.Contents1 Models 2 Features 3 Sample photographs 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksModels[edit] The series began with the A5 series, which was a very basic point-and-shoot camera line. The Axx series that followed offered full manual control (on most models) in a fairly bulky body. The A100/200/3xx/4xx series cameras are stripped-down with very little manual controls. The Axx series has branched off into the A5xx (replaced by the A1xxx series), A6xx, and A7xx series (the latter replaced by the A2xxx series)
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MultiMediaCard
In consumer electronics, the MultiMediaCard
MultiMediaCard
(MMC) is a memory-card standard used for solid-state storage. Unveiled in 1997 by SanDisk
SanDisk
and Siemens AG,[1] MMC is based on a surface-contact low pin-count serial interface using a single memory stack substrate assembly, and is therefore much smaller than earlier systems based on high pin-count parallel interfaces using traditional surface-mount assembly such as CompactFlash. Both products were initially introduced using SanDisk NOR-based flash technology. MMC is about the size of a postage stamp: 24 mm × 32 mm × 1.4 mm. MMC originally used a 1-bit serial interface, but newer versions[when?] of the specification allow transfers of 4 or 8 bits at a time
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Raw Image Format
Raw image fileFilename extension .3fr, .ari, .arw, .bay, .crw, .cr2 .cr3, .cap, .data, .dcs, .dcr, .dng, .drf, .eip, .erf, .fff, .gpr, .iiq, .k25, .kdc, .mdc, .mef, .mos, .mrw, .nef, .nrw, .obm, .orf, .pef, .ptx, .pxn, .r3d, .raf, .raw, .rwl, .rw2, .rwz, .sr2, .srf, .srw, .tif, .x3fType of format Image file formatsA camera raw image file contains minimally processed data from the image sensor of either a digital camera, image scanner, or motion picture film scanner.[1][2] Raw files are named so because they are not yet processed and therefore are not ready to be printed or edited with a bitmap graphics editor. Normally, the image is processed by a raw converter in a wide-gamut internal color space where precise adjustments can be made before conversion to a "positive" file format such as TIFF or JPEG
JPEG
for storage, printing, or further manipulation. This often encodes the image in a device-dependent color space
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AA Battery
The AA battery—also called a double A or Mignon (French for "dainty") battery—is a standard size single cell cylindrical dry battery. The IEC 60086 system calls it size R6, and ANSIC18 calls it size 15.[1] Historically, it is known as SP7 (Standard Power 7) or HP7 (High Power 7) in official documentation the United Kingdom, though it is colloquially known as a "double A battery". AA batteries are common in portable electronic devices. An AA battery is composed of a single electrochemical cell that may be either a primary battery (disposable) or a rechargeable battery
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CCD Size
A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a device for the movement of electrical charge, usually from within the device to an area where the charge can be manipulated, for example conversion into a digital value. This is achieved by "shifting" the signals between stages within the device one at a time. CCDs move charge between capacitive bins in the device, with the shift allowing for the transfer of charge between bins. In recent years CCD has become a major technology for digital imaging. In a CCD image sensor, pixels are represented by p-doped metal-oxide-semiconductors (MOS) capacitors. These capacitors are biased above the threshold for inversion when image acquisition begins, allowing the conversion of incoming photons into electron charges at the semiconductor-oxide interface; the CCD is then used to read out these charges
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Optical Image Stabilization
Image stabilization
Image stabilization
(IS) is a family of techniques that reduce blurring associated with the motion of a camera or other imaging device during exposure. Generally, it compensates for pan and tilt (angular movement, equivalent to yaw and pitch) of the imaging device, though electronic image stabilization can also compensate for rotation.[1] It is used in image-stabilized binoculars, still and video cameras, astronomical telescopes, and also smartphones, mainly the high-end. With still cameras, camera shake is particularly problematic at slow shutter speeds or with long focal length (telephoto or zoom) lenses. With video cameras, camera shake causes visible frame-to-frame jitter in the recorded video
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SDXC
Secure Digital
Secure Digital
(SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association
SD Card Association
(SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic
Panasonic
(Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba
Toshiba
as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association
SD Association
(SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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SDHC
Secure Digital
Secure Digital
(SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association
SD Card Association
(SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic
Panasonic
(Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba
Toshiba
as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association
SD Association
(SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
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Microphone
A microphone, colloquially nicknamed mic or mike (/maɪk/),[1] is a transducer that converts sound into an electrical signal. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, hearing aids, public address systems for concert halls and public events, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, sound recording, two-way radios, megaphones, radio and television broadcasting, and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic sensors or knock sensors. Several different types of microphone are in use, which employ different methods to convert the air pressure variations of a sound wave to an electrical signal. The most common are the dynamic microphone, which uses a coil of wire suspended in a magnetic field; the condenser microphone, which uses the vibrating diaphragm as a capacitor plate, and the piezoelectric microphone, which uses a crystal of piezoelectric material
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Secure Digital
Secure Digital
Secure Digital
(SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association
SD Card Association
(SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic
Panasonic
(Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba
Toshiba
as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association
SD Association
(SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
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Compact Flash
CompactFlash
CompactFlash
(CF) is a flash memory mass storage device used mainly in portable electronic devices. The format was specified and the devices were first manufactured by SanDisk
SanDisk
in 1994.[4] CompactFlash
CompactFlash
became the most successful of the early memory card formats, surpassing Miniature Card
Miniature Card
and SmartMedia. Subsequent formats, such as MMC/SD, various Memory Stick
Memory Stick
formats, and xD-Picture Card offered stiff competition. Most of these cards are smaller than CompactFlash
CompactFlash
while offering comparable capacity and speed
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Charge-coupled Device
A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a device for the movement of electrical charge, usually from within the device to an area where the charge can be manipulated, for example conversion into a digital value. This is achieved by "shifting" the signals between stages within the device one at a time. CCDs move charge between capacitive bins in the device, with the shift allowing for the transfer of charge between bins. In recent years CCD has become a major technology for digital imaging. In a CCD image sensor, pixels are represented by p-doped metal-oxide-semiconductors (MOS) capacitors. These capacitors are biased above the threshold for inversion when image acquisition begins, allowing the conversion of incoming photons into electron charges at the semiconductor-oxide interface; the CCD is then used to read out these charges
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Megapixel
In digital imaging, a pixel, pel,[1] dots, or picture element[2] is a physical point in a raster image, or the smallest addressable element in an all points addressable display device; so it is the smallest controllable element of a picture represented on the screen. Each pixel is a sample of an original image; more samples typically provide more accurate representations of the original. The intensity of each pixel is variable
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Aperture
In optics, an aperture is a hole or an opening through which light travels. More specifically, the aperture and focal length of an optical system determine the cone angle of a bundle of rays that come to a focus in the image plane. The aperture determines how collimated the admitted rays are, which is of great importance for the appearance at the image plane.[2] If an aperture is narrow, then highly collimated rays are admitted, resulting in a sharp focus at the image plane. A wide aperture admits uncollimated rays, resulting in a sharp focus only for rays coming from a certain distance. This means that a wide aperture results in an image that is sharp for things at the correct distance. The aperture also determines how many of the incoming rays are actually admitted and thus how much light reaches the image plane (the narrower the aperture, the darker the image for a given exposure time)
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