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Canary Melon
The Canary melon
Canary melon
( Cucumis melo
Cucumis melo
(Indorus group)[1]) or winter melon [2] is a large, bright-yellow elongated melon with a pale green to white inner flesh. This melon has a distinctively sweet flavor that is slightly tangier than a honeydew melon. The flesh looks like that of a pear but is softer and tastes a little like a cantaloupe. When ripe, the rind has a slightly waxy feel. The name comes from its bright yellow color, which resembles that of the canary. This melon is often marketed as the Juan Canary melon
Canary melon
and can be found in various sizes and shapes. This melon is common in parts of Asia, e.g., Japan and South Korea, and Morocco.[1] Varieties include the smaller, round Fonzy melon, cultivated in Mexico.[3] They are best stored at 15 °C (59 °F).[2]See also[edit]List of culinary fruits MelonReferences[edit]^ a b "Melons". Clovegarden.com
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Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
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Cultivar Group
A Group[1] (previously cultivar-group[2]) is a formal category in the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP) used for cultivated plants that share a defined characteristic.[1] It is represented in a botanical name by the symbol Group or Gp. "Group" or "Gp" is always written with a capital G in a botanical name, or epithet.[a] The Group is not italicized in a plant's name.[1] The ICNCP introduced the term and symbol "Group" in 2004, as a replacement for the lengthy and hyphenated "cultivar-group", which had previously been the category's name since 1969. For the old name "cultivar-group", the non-standard abbreviation cv. group or cv
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Fruit
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering. Fruits are the means by which angiosperms disseminate seeds. Edible fruits, in particular, have propagated with the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship as a means for seed dispersal and nutrition; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food.[1] Accordingly, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings. In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries
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PEAR
About 30 species; see textMany varieties, such as the Nashi pear, are not "pear-shaped".The pear is any of several tree and shrub species of genus Pyrus /ˈpaɪrəs/, in the family Rosaceae. It is also the name of the pomaceous fruit of the trees. Several species of pear are valued for their edible fruit and juices, while others are cultivated as trees.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 History 4 Major recognized taxa 5 Cultivation5.1 Harvest 5.2 Diseases and pests6 Production 7 Storage 8 Uses 9 Nutrition 10 Cultural references 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksEtymology[edit] The word pear is probably from Germanic pera as a loanword of Vulgar Latin pira, the plural of pirum, akin to Greek apios (from Mycenaean ápisos),[1] of Semitic origin (pirâ), meaning "fruit"
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Domestic Canary
Serinus
Serinus
canarius domesticus[3] Linnaeus 1758, I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1861[4]The domestic canary, often simply known as the canary ( Serinus
Serinus
canaria forma domestica[5]), is a domesticated form of the wild canary, a small songbird in the finch family originating from the Macaronesian Islands (The Azores, Madeira
Madeira
and the Canary Islands). Canaries were first bred in captivity in the 17th century. They were brought over by Spanish sailors to Europe. This bird became expensive and fashionable to breed in courts of Spanish and English kings.[6][7] Monks started breeding them and only sold the males (which sing). This kept the birds in short supply and drove the price up. Eventually, Italians obtained hens and were able to breed the birds. This made them very popular, resulted in many breeds arising, and the birds being bred all over Europe. The same occurred in England
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Watermelon Rind Preserves
Watermelon
Watermelon
rind preserves are made by boiling chunks of watermelon rind with sugar and other ingredients. The mixture is then canned in glass jars. According to some recipes, the rind is pared to only the white portion, strips or cubes of which are soaked overnight in a solution of lime or salt and water, then rinsed. It is then boiled, combined with sugar and flavorings such as ginger and lemon, and cooked until the rind is clear.[1] In the United States, these preserves are typical of Southern cuisine.[2] A Serbian variety is called slatko od lubenice.[3] See also[edit]Fruit preserves List of melon dishesReferences[edit]^ Culinary Arts Institute Encyclopedic Cookbook, new revised edition (1968), edited by Ruth Berolzheimer, page 838, Chicago: Book Production Industries. ^ Vilas, James (2007). The Glory of Southern Cooking. John Wiley and Sons. p. 415
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Hami Melon
The Hami melon (Chinese: 哈密瓜; pinyin: Hāmì guā) is a type of muskmelon, originally from Hami, Xinjiang. It is also referred to as the Chinese Hami melon or the snow melon. The outer color is generally white through pink or yellow through green. The inside flesh is sweet and crisp. More than 100 cultivated forms and hybrids of the 'Hami' melon have been grown in China.[1] In Mandarin, Hami gua can also be used to refer to cantaloupe.References[edit]^ Lim, T.K. (2012). "Cucumis melo L. (Reticulatus Group) 'Hami melon'". Edible Medicinal And Non-Medicinal Plants. Springer Netherlands. pp. 231–234. ISBN 978-94-007-1763-3. Anderson, Eugene N. (1990). The Food of China. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 80, 162, 209. ISBN 978-0300047394.  Foodista: Hami Melon, retrieved 13 August 2013  China Culture Melons: Cantaloupe, Muskmelon, Honeydew, Crenshaw, Casaba, etc., retrieved 19 August 2013 v t eMelonBenincasaSpeciesB
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Cucumis Metuliferus
Cucumis
Cucumis
metuliferus, horned melon or kiwano, also African horned cucumber or melon, jelly melon, hedged gourd, melano, is an annual vine in the cucumber and melon family, Cucurbitaceae. Its fruit has horn-like spines, hence the name "horned melon". Ripe fruit has orange skin and lime green, jelly-like flesh with a refreshingly fruity taste, and texture similar to a passionfruit or pomegranate.[1] C. metuliferus is native to Sub-Saharan Africa.[2][3] It is now grown in the United States, Portugal, Italy, Germany, Chile, Australia, and New Zealand. Kiwano is a traditional food plant in Africa
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Cucumis Myriocarpus
Cucumis
Cucumis
myriocarpus, the gooseberry cucumber,[1] gooseberry gourd,[2] paddy melon or prickly paddy melon is a prostrate or climbing annual herb native to tropical and southern Africa.[3] It has small, round, yellow-green or green-striped fruit with soft spines, small yellow flowers and deeply lobed, light green leaves
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Bailan Melon
The Bailan melon is a locally famous type of melon grown near Lanzhou, the capital city of Gansu
Gansu
province in the People's Republic of China.[1] According to Chinese sources, the melons were introduced to China
China
by a Mr. Wallace, Vice president of the United States, who donated melon seeds to the locals while visiting in the 1940s.[citation needed] This man was almost certainly Henry A. Wallace, Vice president under Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who had a background in agriculture and had founded a major seed company, Pioneer Hi-Bred. In photographs, the melons appear light yellow, orange or white, with a light green or apricot yellow flesh, similar in appearance to the honeydew melon. See also[edit]MelonReferences[edit]^ " China
China
Specialty & Snack". Specialty & Snack. 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-10. v t eMelonBenincasaSpeciesB
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Charentais Melon
A Charentais melon is a type of cantaloupe melon, Cucumis
Cucumis
melo var. cantalupensis. It is a small variety of melon, similar in flesh to cantaloupes, but with a more fragrant smell. It was developed in western France
France
around 1920 as a more refined cantaloupe. Most are now produced in North Africa, with some limited production in the United States. External links[edit]Specialty produce: Charentais Melonv t eMelonBenincasaSpeciesB. hispida (Winter melon)CitrullusSpeciesC. lanatusWatermelonC. cafferCitron melonC. colocynthis (egusi) C. ecirrhosus (Namib tsamma)Products and dishesEgusi Watermelon
Watermelon
rind preserves Watermelon
Watermelon
seed oil Watermelon
Watermelon
steakCucumisSpeciesC. melo (muskmelon)Barattiere Cantaloupe Carosello Galia KoreanC
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Crane Melon
The Crane Melon
Melon
is an heirloom melon developed by Oliver Crane in the early 20th century.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Recognition 3 History3.1 Crane Family 3.2 Crane Melon4 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] The Crane Melon
Melon
is a variety that was developed in the early 1900s in Santa Rosa, California. It is grown and sold at the Crane Melon
Melon
Barn in Santa Rosa. A ripe melon can grow to be about 4-7 pounds and has an orange flesh. The melon is described as "exceptionally sweet and juicy". Recognition[edit] The Crane Melon
Melon
has appeared in magazines, newspapers and TV shows. It is on the Ark of Taste: Slow Food USA
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Yubari King
The Yubari King (夕張メロン, Yūbari Meron, Yūbari melon) is a cantaloupe cultivar farmed in greenhouses in Yūbari, Hokkaido, a small city close to Sapporo.[1] The Yubari King is a hybrid of two other cantaloupe cultivars: Earl's Favourite and Burpee's "Spicy" Cantaloupe.[2] The hybrid's scientific name is Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud. cv. Yubari King.Three pairs of Yubari King melons packed in cardboard for transportA top-grade melon is to be perfectly round and have an exceptionally smooth rind
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Montreal Melon
The Montreal melon, also known as the Montreal market muskmelon or the Montreal nutmeg melon (French: melon de Montréal), is a variety of melon recently rediscovered and cultivated in the Montreal, Canada, area. Scientifically, it is a cultivar of Cucumis melo subsp. melo.Contents1 History 2 Method of cultivation 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]American newspaper article from 1885 about the melon, shown on the left.It was originally widely grown between the St. Lawrence River and Mount Royal, on the Montreal Plain. In its prime from the late 19th century until World War II, it was one of the most popular varieties of melon on the east coast of North America. The fruit was large (larger than any other melon cultivated on the continent at the time), round, netted (like a muskmelon), flattened at the ends, deeply ribbed, with a thin rind. Its flesh was light green, almost melting in the mouth when eaten
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