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Canadian Dollar

The Canadian dollar (symbol: $; code: CAD; French: dollar canadien) is the currency of Canada. It is abbreviated with the dollar sign $, or sometimes CA$, Can$[1] or C$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies.[note 1] It is divided into 100 cents (¢). Owing to the image of a loon on its back, the dollar coin, and sometimes the unit of currency itself, are sometimes referred to as the loonie by English-speaking Canadians and foreign exchange traders and analysts.[2] Accounting for approximately 2% of all global reserves, the Canadian dollar is the fifth most held reserve currency in the world, behind the U.S
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Nicaraguan Córdoba
The córdoba (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkoɾdoβa], sign: C$; code: NIO) is the currency of Nicaragua. It is divided into 100 centavos. The first córdoba was introduced on March 20, 1912. It replaced the peso moneda corriente at a rate of 12½ pesos m/c = 1 córdoba and the peso fuerte at par. It was initially nearly equal to the US dollar. It was named after the Conquistador Francisco Hernández de Córdoba. On February 15, 1988, the 2nd córdoba was introduced. It was equal to 1,000 1st córdobas. On April 30, 1991 the third córdoba, also called the córdoba oro, was introduced, worth 5,000,000 2nd córdobas.

First córdoba

In 1912, coins were introduced in denominations of ½, 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 centavos and 1 córdoba. The ½ and 1 centavo were minted in bronze, the 5 centavos in cupro-nickel and the higher denominations in silver
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Energy Policy Of Canada

The development of electric power in British Columbia began with the installation of electric lights in Victoria in 1883. Created in 1897, the BC Electric Company built BC's first hydroelectric plant near Victoria the following year, and created subsidiaries to supply electricity to Victoria and Vancouver, the province's two largest cities. BC Electric was taken over by Montreal-based Power Corporation in 1928. Before and during World War II, BC Electric primarily supplied power to the main cities of Vancouver and Victoria, leaving other regions with spotty and unreliable supply. In 1938, the BC government created the British Columbia Utilities Commission, which limited BC Electric's profit margins. In 1945, the provincial government created a crown corporation, the BC Power CommissioThe development of electric power in British Columbia began with the installation of electric lights in Victoria in 1883
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Canadian Bank Note Company
The Canadian Bank Note Company (CBNC) is a Canadian security printing company. It is best known for holding the contract with the Bank of Canada to supply it with Canada's banknotes since 1935. The company's other clients include private businesses, national and sub-national governments, central banks, and postal services from around the world. In addition to bank notes, the company produces passports, driver's licences, birth certificates, postage stamps, coupons, and many other security-conscious document-related products. It also prints and provides document reading systems for identification cards, lottery tickets, stamps, and bank notes. From 1897 until 1923, CBN was a unit of the New York-based American Bank Note Company (now known as ABCorp)
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Royal Canadian Mint
Coordinates: 45°25′53″N 75°41′57″W / 45.43135°N 75.699282°W / 45.43135; -75.699282 In November 1960 the Master of the Mint, N.A. Parker, advised the Minister of Finance that there was a need for a new facility. The Ottawa facility had reached capacity, the Philadelphia Mint was producing a large number of Canadian 10¢ coins and all numismatic coins were being produced in Hull, Quebec. It was finally recognized the Mint required an additional facility. In 1963 and 1964, the government discussed the possibility of building a facility that would be functional within two years. Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson suggested building the facility in Elliot Lake, Ontario.[4] A 1968 study showed the Ottawa Mint facility was antiquated
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Economy Of Canada

The United States is by far Canada's largest trading partner, with more than $1.7 billion CAD in trade per day in 2005.[100] In 2009, 73% of Canada's expThe United States is by far Canada's largest trading partner, with more than $1.7 billion CAD in trade per day in 2005.[100] In 2009, 73% of Canada's exports went to the United States, and 63% of Canada's imports were from the United States.[101] Trade with Canada makes up 23% of the United States' exports and 17% of its imports.[102] By comparison, in 2005 this was more than U.S. trade with all countries in the European Union combined,[103] and well over twice U.S. trade with all the countries of Latin America combined.[104] Just the two-way trade that crosses the Ambassador Bridge between Michigan and Ontario equals all U.S. exports to Japan
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Economic History Of Canada

Canadian historians until the 1980s tended to focus on the history of Canada's economy because of the far fewer political and military conflicts present in Canadian history than in other societies. Many of the most prominent English Canadian historians from this period were economic historians, such as Harold Innis, Donald Creighton and Arthur R. M. Lower. Scholars of Canadian economic history were heirs to the traditions that developed in Europe and the United States, but frameworks of study that worked well elsewhere often failed in Canada. The heavily Marxist influenced economic history present in Europe has little relevance to most of Canadian hisCanadian historians until the 1980s tended to focus on the history of Canada's economy because of the far fewer political and military conflicts present in Canadian history than in other societies
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Early Canadian Banking System
The early Canadian banking system (British North America and New France until 1763; then renamed Upper and Lower Canada) was regulated entirely by the colonial government. Primitive forms of banking emerged early in the colonial period to solve the drain of wealth caused by the application of mercantilist theory. The drain of wealth translated into a complete lack of gold or silver bullion in the colonies, and thus, a complete lack of forms of economic exchange and payment. In New France, playing cards were issued as a method of payment in the 1680s by the Intendant of New France, in addition to the coins introduced in the 1660s. However, the massive drain of wealth from New France to Europe resulting from mercantilist trade policies made it impossible to back card money with gold bullion. Card money was thus essentially worthless
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History Of The Petroleum Industry In Canada
The Canadian petroleum industry arose in parallel with that of the United States. Because of Canada's unique geography, geology, resources and patterns of settlement, however, it developed in different ways. The evolution of the petroleum sector has been a key factor in the history of Canada, and helps illustrate how the country became quite distinct from her neighbour to the south. Although the conventional oil and gas industry in western Canada is mature, the country's Arctic and offshore petroleum resources are mostly in early stages of exploration and development. Canada became a natural gas-producing giant in the late 1950s and is second, after Russia, in exports; the country also is home to the world's largest natural gas liquids extraction facilities
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Primary Sector
The Primary sector of the economy includes any industry involved in the extraction and production of raw materials, such as farming, logging, hunting, fishing, and mining.[1][2][3] The primary sector tends to make up a larger portion of the economy in developing countries than it does in developed countries
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Agriculture In Canada

The depression and drought of the Dirty Thirties was devastating. This drought resulted in a mass exodus of population from the prairies, as well as new agricultural practices such as soil conservation, and crop rotation.[108] The use of soil conservation pThe depression and drought of the Dirty Thirties was devastating. This drought resulted in a mass exodus of population from the prairies, as well as new agricultural practices such as soil conservation, and crop rotation.[108] The use of soil conservation practices such as crop rotation, cover crops, and windbreaks was expanded following the drought experiences of the dirty thirties. Literally layers and layers of topsoil would be blowing away during this time. Bow River Irrigation Project, Red Deer River Project and the St
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