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Campaspe Plains Massacre
Campaspe Plains massacre, occurred in 1839 in Central Victoria, Australia as a reprisal raid against Aboriginal resistance to the invasion and occupation of the Dja Dja Wurrung
Dja Dja Wurrung
and Daung Wurrung lands.[1] Charles Hutton took over the Campaspe run, located near the border of Dja Dja Wurrung
Dja Dja Wurrung
and Daung Wurrung, in 1838 following sporadic confrontations.Contents1 Cause 2 The Massacre 3 See also 4 ReferencesCause[edit] In April 1839 five Aborigines were killed by three white men. In response Hugh Bryan, a shepherd, and James Neill, a hut keeper were killed in May 1839 by Aborigines identified as Daung Wurrung, who had robbed a hut of bedding, clothes, guns and ammunition and also ran a flock of 700 sheep off the property, possibly as retribution for the earlier Aboriginal deaths
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Massacre
A massacre is a killing, typically of multiple victims, considered morally unacceptable, especially when perpetrated by a group of political actors against defenseless victims
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Tedbury's War
Tedbury (c.1780, Botany Bay-1810, Parramatta) (also "Tidbury", "Tjedboro") was a Darug
Darug
Aboriginal Australian
Aboriginal Australian
involved in frequent acts of resistance to British colonists in the early years of New South Wales. He was son of noted warrior and resistance fighter Pemulwuy.[1] Tedbury was captured in 1805 and tried before the magistrate at Parramatta, Reverend Samuel Marsden.[2]:155[3] He was released at the behest of Aboriginal Australians who had participated in the capture of Musquito.[4] Tedbury was an ally of John Macarthur and a frequent visitor to Elizabeth Farm. When Governor Bligh
Governor Bligh
placed Macarthur under arrest in 1808, Tedbury offered to spear the governor. He also took part in a robbery of a traveller named Tunks on Parramatta Road in 1809
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Bunurong
The Boon wurrung
Boon wurrung
are Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
of the Kulin
Kulin
nation, who occupy South-Central Victoria, Australia. Before British settlement, they lived as all people of the Kulin
Kulin
nation lived, sustainably on the land, predominantly as hunters and gatherers, for tens of thousands of years. They were referred to by Europeans as the Western Port
Western Port
or Port Philip tribe and were in alliance with other tribes in the Kulin nation, having particularly strong ties to the Wurundjeri
Wurundjeri
people
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Coniston Massacre
Coordinates: 22°02′35″S 132°29′28″E / 22.043°S 132.491°E / -22.043; 132.491Coniston StationLocation in Northern TerritoryThe Coniston massacre, which took place from 14 August to 18 October 1928 near the Coniston cattle station in Northern Territory, Australia, was the last known officially sanctioned massacre of Indigenous Australians and one of the last events of the Australian Frontier Wars. People of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre, and Kaytetye groups were killed. The massacre occurred in revenge for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, killed by Aboriginal people in August 1928 at a place now known as Yukurru, also known as Brooks Soak. Official records at the time stated that 31 people were killed
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Darkey Flat Massacre
The Darkey Flat Massacre is a massacre of Aboriginal Australians by European settlers that supposedly took place some time between 1845 and 1853
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Avenue Range Station Massacre
The Avenue Range Station massacre was the murder of at least nine Aboriginal Tanganekald people, who were shot by white settlers on the Avenue Range pastoral station in the southeast of the colony of South Australia around September 1848, during the Australian frontier wars. Those confirmed to have been killed were a blind old man, three women, two teenage girls, and three female children, including a baby. One account mentions eleven victims. The sheep farmer James Brown and his overseer, Eastwood, were suspected of committing the murders, and Brown was charged with the murder of "unknown aboriginal natives" on 1 March 1849. His motive was apparently retaliation for the theft of his sheep by Aboriginal people. The magistrate who committed him for trial observed to a friend that there was "little question of the butchery or the butcher"
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Waterloo Bay Massacre
The Waterloo Bay massacre
Waterloo Bay massacre
or Elliston massacre refers to a fatal clash between settlers and Aboriginal Australians
Aboriginal Australians
in late May 1849 on the cliffs of Waterloo Bay near Elliston, South Australia
Elliston, South Australia
which led to the deaths of a number of Aboriginal people, and forms part of the Australian frontier wars. The events leading up to the fatal clash included killings of three white settlers by Aboriginal people, and the killing of one Aboriginal person and the death by poisoning of five others by white settlers
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Cullin-La-Ringo Massacre
The Cullin-la-ringo massacre or Wills Tragedy occurred north of modern-day Springsure in Central Queensland on 17 October 1861. It remains the largest massacre of white settlers by Aborigines in Australian history,[1] and a pivotal moment in the frontier wars in Queensland.[2]Contents1 Massacre 2 Response 3 Further reading 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 External linksMassacre[edit] In mid October 1861, a squatter party from the colony of Victoria under Horatio Wills began a temporary tent camp to start the process of setting up the grazing property of Cullin-la-ringo. Wills's party, an enormous settlement train including bullock wagons and more than 10,000 sheep, had set out from Brisbane eight months earlier to set up a farm at Cullin-la-ringo, a property formed by amalgamating four blocks of land with a total area of 260 square kilometres (64,000 acres)
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Flying Foam Massacre
The Flying Foam massacre was a series of confrontations between white settlers and Aboriginal people around Flying Foam Passage on Murujuga Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia. The confrontations occurred between February and May 1868[1] triggered by the killings of two police officers and a local workman. The confrontations resulted in the deaths of unknown number of Jaburara (or Yaburrara, Yapurarra) people with estimates ranging between 15 and 150 dead.[2] The confrontations followed the killings on 7 February, on the south west shore of Nickol Bay, of Police Constable William Griffis, an Aboriginal police assistant named Peter, and a pearling worker named George Breem, by some Jaburara people.[3][4] along with the disappearance of a pearling lugger captain, Henry Jermyn. Three Jaburara were arrested and convicted of Griffis' murder
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Kalkadoon Wars
The Kalkadoon Wars were a series of encounters between European colonists and the Kalkadoon people of Australia. Europeans started settling in the Kalkadoon's homelands around 1860. At first relations were peaceful but as numbers of new settlers increased, things became more hostile and the Kalkadoons eventually resorted to guerrilla war.[1] Battle Mountain[edit] In 1884 the Kalkadoons killed five native police and a prominent pastoralist. The Queensland government sent in heavily armed police and ended up fighting the Kalkadoon at Battle Mountain
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Mowla Bluff Massacre
The Mowla Bluff massacre was an incident involving the murder of a number of Indigenous Australians at Geegully Creek, near Mowla Bluff, in the Kimberley region of Western Australia in 1916. Mowla Bluff is a cattle station 140 kilometres (87 mi) south of Derby and 75 kilometres (47 mi) southwest of Jarlmadangah. Responding to the brutality of the white station manager, some local men gave him a beating. In reprisal, an armed mob which included officials and residents rounded up a large number of Aboriginal men, women and children who were then shot
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Forrest River Massacre
The Forrest River massacre, or Oombulgurri massacre of June 1926, was a massacre of Indigenous Australian
Indigenous Australian
people by a group of law enforcement personnel and civilians in the wake of the killing of a pastoralist in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. An initial police enquiry concluded that sixteen Aboriginals were killed and their remains burnt. Subsequently, a Royal Commission was organised in 1927 to further investigate the matter. This Commission found that twenty Aboriginals were murdered and burnt at several different locations. Two Western Australian police constables who participated in the punitive expedition that led to the massacre, James St Jack and Dennis Regan, were charged with murder and arrested. Despite the findings of the Commission and police investigation, the case never went to trial, with a preliminary hearing concluding that a jury would not be able to make a conviction
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