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Campaign History Of The Roman Military
From its origin as a city-state on the peninsula of Italy
Italy
in the 8th century BC, to its rise as an empire covering much of Southern Europe, Western Europe, Near East
Near East
and North Africa
North Africa
to its fall in the 5th century AD, the political history of Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
was closely entwined with its military history. The core of the campaign history of the Roman military
Roman military
is an aggregate of different accounts of the Roman military's land battles, from its initial defense against and subsequent conquest of the city's hilltop neighbors on the Italian peninsula, to the ultimate struggle of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
for its existence against invading Huns, Vandals
Vandals
and Germanic tribes. These accounts were written by various authors throughout and after the history of the Empire
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Military Of Ancient Rome
The military of ancient Rome, according to Titus Livius, one of the more illustrious historians of Rome over the centuries, was a key element in the rise of Rome over “above seven hundred years”[1] from a small settlement in Latium
Latium
to the capital of an empire governing a wide region around the shores of the Mediterranean, or, as the Romans themselves said, ‘’mare nostrum’’, “our sea.” Livy
Livy
asserts”..
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Pannonian Limes
The Pannonian Limes
Limes
(Latin: Limes
Limes
Pannonicus, German: Pannonischer Limes) is that part of the old Roman fortified frontier known as the Danubian Limes
Limes
that runs for approximately 420 kilometres from the Roman camp
Roman camp
of Klosterneuburg in the Vienna Basin
Vienna Basin
in Austria
Austria
to the castrum in Singidunum
Singidunum
(Belgrade) in present-day Serbia. The garrisons of these camps protected the Pannonian provinces against attacks from the north from the time of Augustus
Augustus
(31 BC-14 AD) to the beginning of the 5th century
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Alb Limes
The Alb Limes
Limes
(German: Alblimes) is a Roman frontier fortification or limes of the late 1st century AD in the Swabian Jura, also known as the Swabian Alb. The Alb Limes
Limes
runs for just under 135 kilometres from Rottweil
Rottweil
(Latin: Arae Flaviae) in the southwest to Heidenheim an der Brenz (Latin: Aquileia) in the northeast. Literature[edit]Regina Franke: Die Kastelle I und II von Arae Flaviae/ Rottweil
Rottweil
und die römische Okkupation des oberen Neckargebietes. Stuttgart, 2003, ISBN 3-8062-1787-4 (Forschungen und Berichte zur Vor- und Frühgeschichte in Baden-Württemberg, 93). Jörg Heiligmann: Der "Alb-Limes". Ein Beitrag zur römischen Besetzungsgeschichte Südwestdeutschlands
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Lautertal Limes
The Lautertal Limes
Limes
(in German also: Sibyllenspur or Sybillenspur) is a Roman limes of the early 2nd century which is located between the River Neckar
Neckar
and the Swabian Jura
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Lower Germanic Limes
The Lower Germanic Limes
Limes
(German: Niedergermanischer Limes) is the former frontier between the Roman province
Roman province
of Germania inferior
Germania inferior
and Germania Magna. The Lower Germanic Limes
Limes
separated that part of the Rhineland
Rhineland
left of the Rhine
Rhine
as well as the Netherlands, which was part of the Roman Empire, from the less tightly controlled regions east of the Rhine. The route of the limes started near the estuary of the Oude Rijn on the North Sea. It then followed the course of the Rhine
Rhine
and ended at the Vinxtbach
Vinxtbach
in present-day Niederbreisig, a quarter in the town of Bad Breisig, the border with the province of Germania superior
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Main Limes
The Main Limes
Limes
(German: Mainlimes), also called the Nasser Limes, was built around 90 A. D
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Neckar-Odenwald Limes
The Neckar-Odenwald Limes
Limes
(German: Neckar-Odenwald-Limes) is a collective term for two, very different early sections of the Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes, a Roman defensive frontier line that may have been utilised during slightly different periods in history. The Neckar-Odenwald Limes
Limes
consists of the northern Odenwald Limes (Odenwaldlimes), a cross-country limes with camps, watchtowers and palisades, which linked the River Main
River Main
(Latin: Moenus) with the Neckar (Latin: Nicer), and the adjoining southern Neckar
Neckar
Limes
Limes
(Neckarlimes), which in earlier research was seen as a typical 'riverine limes' (German: Nasser Limes; Latin: limes ripa), whereby the river replaced the function of the palisade as an approach obstacle
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Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes
The Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes
Limes
(German: Obergermanisch-Raetische Limes), or ORL, is a 550-kilometre-long section of the former external frontier of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
between the rivers Rhine
Rhine
and Danube. It runs from Rheinbrohl to Eining on the Danube. The Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes
Limes
is an archaeological site and, since 2005, a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site. Together with the Lower Germanic Limes
Lower Germanic Limes
it forms part of the Limes
Limes
Germanicus.Contents1 Terminology 2 Function 3 Research history3.1 Imperial Limes
Limes
Commission 3.2 Sections4 Literature 5 Maps 6 External links 7 ReferencesTerminology[edit]The Saalburg. Built 1899-1907, the site is the most significant attempt to reconstruct the archeological past
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Wetterau Limes
The Wetterau
Wetterau
Limes
Limes
is the name given in the field of historical research to that part of the Upper Germanic-R
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Danube–Iller–Rhine Limes
The Danube–Iller–Rhine Limes
Limes
(German: Donau-Iller-Rhein-Limes) or DIRL was a large-scale defensive system of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that was built after the project for the Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes
Upper Germanic-Rhaetian Limes
in the late 3rd century AD
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Norican Limes
Originally the Latin
Latin
noun līmes (English: /ˈlaɪmiːz/;[1] Latin pl. līmitēs) had a number of different meanings: a path or balk delimiting fields, a boundary line or marker, any road or path, any channel, such as a stream channel, or any distinction or difference. The term was also commonly used after the 3rd century AD to denote a military district under the command of a dux limitis.[2] Limes
Limes
has sometimes been adopted in modern times for a border defence or delimiting system of Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
marking the boundaries and provinces of the Roman Empire, but it was not used by the Romans for the imperial frontier, fortified or not
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Claustra Alpium Iuliarum
Claustra Alpium Iuliarum
Claustra Alpium Iuliarum
(Latin for 'Barrier of the Julian Alps'; hereby, the term Julian Alps
Julian Alps
refers to the wider mountainous and hilly region from the
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Limes Alutanus
Limes
Limes
Alutanus was a fortified line consisting of a vallum, built in the North-South direction, on the eastern side of the Olt river
Olt river
and seven Roman castra, as is remembered by Tabula Peutingeriana. Limes Alutanus was the eastern border of the Roman province of Dacia.[1] The fortification was ordered by the Roman emperor Hadrian, in order to stop invasions and raids from the east.[2] The following seven castra positions were assumed by Romanian archeologist Vasile Pârvan, and later confirmed by archeological research
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Saxon Shore
The Saxon Shore (Latin: litus Saxonicum) was a military command of the late Roman Empire, consisting of a series of fortifications on both sides of the English Channel. It was established in the late 3rd century and was led by the "Count of the Saxon Shore". In the late 4th century, his functions were limited to Britain, while the fortifications in Gaul were established as separate commands. Several Saxon Shore
Saxon Shore
forts survive in east and south-east England.Contents1 Background 2 Meaning of the term and role 3 The forts3.1 In Britain 3.2 In Gaul4 In popular culture 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] During the latter half of the 3rd century, the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
faced a grave crisis. Internally, it was weakened by civil wars, the violent succession of brief emperors, and secession in the provinces, while externally it faced a new wave of attacks by "barbarian" tribes
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Limes Moesiae
Limes
Limes
Moesiae was a Roman-built system of fortifications consisting of three lines of defense, between the Black Sea
Black Sea
shore and the Danube. Additionally, in Wallachia
Wallachia
there were other two lines of defense: the Constantine Wall and the Limes
Limes
Transalutanus.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History 3 Controversy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 External linksCharacteristics[edit] The Limes
Limes
Moesiae, near the Danube
Danube
delta, probably was built initially during Trajan
Trajan
times
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