HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cambrian
The Cambrian
Cambrian
Period ( /ˈkæmbriən/ or /ˈkeɪmbriən/) was the first geological period of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
Era, of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
Eon.[6] The Cambrian
Cambrian
lasted 55.6 million years from the end of the preceding Ediacaran
Ediacaran
Period 541 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Ordovician
Ordovician
Period 485.4 mya.[7] Its subdivisions, and its base, are somewhat in flux
[...More...]

"Cambrian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parts Per Million
In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction. Since these fractions are quantity-per-quantity measures, they are pure numbers with no associated units of measurement. Commonly used are ppm (parts-per-million, 10−6), ppb (parts-per-billion, 10−9), ppt (parts-per-trillion, 10−12) and ppq (parts-per-quadrillion, 10−15). This notation is not part of the SI system and its meaning is ambiguous.Contents1 Overview1.1 In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy2 Parts-per expressions 3 Criticism3.1 Long and short scales 3.2 Thousand
Thousand
vs. trillion 3.3 Mass fraction vs. mole fraction vs
[...More...]

"Parts Per Million" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbon Dioxide
Carbon
Carbon
dioxide (chemical formula CO2) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air. Carbon
Carbon
dioxide consists of a carbon atom covalently double bonded to two oxygen atoms. It occurs naturally in Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
as a trace gas. The current concentration is about 0.04% (405 ppm) by volume, having risen from pre-industrial levels of 280 ppm. Natural sources include volcanoes, hot springs and geysers, and it is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution in water and acids. Because carbon dioxide is soluble in water, it occurs naturally in groundwater, rivers and lakes, ice caps, glaciers and seawater. It is present in deposits of petroleum and natural gas
[...More...]

"Carbon Dioxide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Baykonurian Glaciation
The Baykonurian glaciation is a glacial episode dating to around the Proterozoic– Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
boundary – precise dates are difficult to constrain but 547 million years ago has been proposed — and thus posited as a contributor to the Cambrian explosion. Its deposits are known in regions of Asia and Africa, and it apparently affected both palaeohemispheres. It is named for the Baykonur Formation in Central Asia.[1][2][3][4]References[edit]^ Germs, G.J.B.; Gaucher, C. (2012). "Nature and extent of a late Ediacaran
Ediacaran
(ca. 547 Ma) glacigenic erosion surface in southern Africa". South African Journal of Geology. 115: 91–102. doi:10.2113/gssajg.115.91.  ^ Chumakov, N. M. (30 November 2011). "Chapter 26 Glacial deposits of the Baykonur Formation, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan". Geological Society, London, Memoirs. 36 (1): 303–307. doi:10.1144/M36.26.  ^ Chumakov, N. M. (12 August 2009)
[...More...]

"Baykonurian Glaciation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cumbria
Cumbria
Cumbria
(English: /ˈkʌmbriə/ KUM-bree-ə; locally [ˈkʊmbɾiə] KUUM-bree-ə) is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England. The county and Cumbria
Cumbria
County Council, its local government, came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. Cumbria's county town is Carlisle, in the north of the county, and the only other major urban area is Barrow-in-Furness
Barrow-in-Furness
on the southwestern tip of the county. The county of Cumbria
Cumbria
consists of six districts (Allerdale, Barrow-in-Furness, Carlisle, Copeland, Eden and South Lakeland), and in 2008 had a population of just under half a million
[...More...]

"Cumbria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oxygen
Oxygen
Oxygen
is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table, a highly reactive nonmetal, and an oxidizing agent that readily forms oxides with most elements as well as with other compounds. By mass, oxygen is the third-most abundant element in the universe, after hydrogen and helium. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless and odorless diatomic gas with the formula O 2. Diatomic oxygen gas constitutes 20.8% of the Earth's atmosphere
[...More...]

"Oxygen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Namacalathus
Namacalathus[a] is a problematic metazoan fossil occurring in the latest Ediacaran. The first, and only described species, N. hermanastes,[b] was first described in 2000 from Nama Group of central and southern Namibia.[1] A U–Pb zircon age from the fossiliferous rock in Namibia
Namibia
and Oman provides an age for the Namacalathus zone in the range from 549 to 542 Ma, which corresponds to the Late Ediacaran
[...More...]

"Namacalathus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helcionelloida
and see text Yochelcionella
Yochelcionella
cyranoPelagiella atlantoides Helcionelloida
Helcionelloida
is an extinct group of ancient molluscs (phylum Mollusca). These are the oldest known conchiferan molluscs, that is, they had a mineralised shell. Some members of this class were mistaken for Monoplacophorans. The class was erected by Peel in 1991.[1] This page deals only with the taxonomy of Helcionelloida. Details of their biology and anatomy are covered at Helcionelliformes.Contents1 Anatomy 2 2005 taxonomy 3 2006-2007 taxonomy 4 References 5 External linksAnatomy[edit] These animals were untorted and they had a coiled, cone-shaped shell. The majority of species were small (shells being about two millimeters in length and or diameter). Modern reconstructions depict them as resembling snails
[...More...]

"Helcionelloida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carboniferous
The Carboniferous
Carboniferous
is a geologic period and system that spans 60 million years from the end of the Devonian
Devonian
Period 358.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Permian
Permian
Period, 298.9 Mya
[...More...]

"Carboniferous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Triassic
The Triassic
Triassic
( /traɪˈæsɪk/) is a geologic period and system which spans 50.9 million years from the end of the Permian
Permian
Period 251.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 201.3 Mya.[8] The Triassic
Triassic
is the first period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. Both the start and end of the period are marked by major extinction events.[9] The Triassic
Triassic
began in the wake of the Permian– Triassic
Triassic
extinction event, which left the earth's biosphere impoverished; it would take well into the middle of this period for life to recover its former diversity. Therapsids and archosaurs were the chief terrestrial vertebrates during this time
[...More...]

"Triassic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jurassic
The Jurassic
Jurassic
( /dʒʊˈræsɪk/; from Jura Mountains) was a geologic period and system that spanned 56 million years from the end of the Triassic
Triassic
Period 201.3 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period 145 Mya.[note 1] The Jurassic
Jurassic
constituted the middle period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era, also known as the Age of Reptiles. The start of the period was marked by the major Triassic–Jurassic extinction event
[...More...]

"Jurassic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cretaceous
The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
( /krɪˈteɪʃəs/, kri-TAY-shəs) is a geologic period and system that spans 79 million years from the end of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 145 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Paleogene Period 66 mya. It is the last period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period is usually abbreviated K, for its German translation Kreide (chalk). The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that created numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now-extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. During this time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared
[...More...]

"Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paleogene
The Paleogene (/ˈpæliədʒiːn, ˈpeɪliə-/; also spelled Palaeogene or Palæogene; informally Lower Tertiary or Early Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 43 million years from the end of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period 66 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Neogene
Neogene
Period 23.03 Mya
[...More...]

"Paleogene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neogene
The Neogene
Neogene
( /ˈniːəˌdʒiːn/)[6][7] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary
Quaternary
Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene
Neogene
is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene
Miocene
and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene
Neogene
cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged. Early hominids, the ancestors of humans, appeared in Africa near the end of the period
[...More...]

"Neogene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Orsten
The Orsten
Orsten
fauna is fossilized organisms preserved in the Orsten[1] lagerstätten of Late Series 3, Stage 4[2] to Furongian (Upper Cambrian) rocks, notably at Kinnekulle
Kinnekulle
and on the island of Öland, all in Sweden. The initial site, discovered in 1975 by Klaus Müller and his assistants, exceptionally preserves soft-bodied organisms, and their larvae, who are preserved uncompacted in three dimensions. The fossils are phosphatized and silicified, thus the delicate chitinous cuticle and soft parts are not affected by acids, which act upon the limestone nodules within which the fossils have survived. Acids dissolve the limestone, revealing the microfossils in a recovery process called "acid etching"
[...More...]

"Orsten" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Neoproterozoic
The Neoproterozoic Era is the unit of geologic time from 1,000 to 541 million years ago.[1] It is the last era of the Precambrian
Precambrian
Supereon and the Proterozoic Eon; it is subdivided into the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods
[...More...]

"Neoproterozoic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.