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Calvinist
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Reform (other)
Reform is beneficial change. Reform may also refer to: Reform (Anglican), an evangelical organisation within Anglicanism Reform (magazine), a Christian magazine Reform (think tank), a British think tank
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Westminster Standards
The Westminster Standards
Westminster Standards
is a collective name for the documents drawn up by the Westminster Assembly
Westminster Assembly
(1643–49). These include the Westminster Confession of Faith, the Westminster Shorter Catechism, the Westminster Larger Catechism, the Directory of Public Worship, and the Form of Church Government,[1] and represent the doctrine and church polity of 17th-century English and Scottish Presbyterianism. The Westminster Confession of Faith
Westminster Confession of Faith
and Larger and Shorter Catechism have been adopted as doctrinal standards by a number of Reformed
Reformed
and Presbyterian Christian denominations.[2][3] Following the approval of the Confession and catechisms by the Church of Scotland in 1648, printers in England and Scotland began publishing them with other religious documents in collections referred to as the Westminster Standards
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Presbyterianism In South Korea
In South Korea, there are roughly 20.5 million Christians of whom 15 million are Protestants; of those some 9 to 10 million are Presbyterians. Presbyterians in South Korea
South Korea
worship in over 100 different Presbyterian denominational churches who trace their history back to the United Presbyterian Assembly.[1]Contents1 History 2 Confessional basis 3 Korean Presbyterian denominations 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Protestantism was introduced to Korea in the late 19th century through missionaries. Lay people like Suh Sang-Yoon and Baek Hong-Joon spread their knowledge of the Gospels
Gospels
after their conversion, and Christianity, of which the Catholic form had been suppressed in the middle of the 19th century, began to grow again in Korea. In 1883, Suh founded the first Protestant
Protestant
Christian
Christian
community in Korea
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North American Presbyterian And Reformed Council
The North American Presbyterian
Presbyterian
and Reformed
Reformed
Council (NAPARC) is an association of several Presbyterian
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World Reformed Fellowship
The World Reformed
Reformed
Fellowship (WRF) is an ecumenical Christian organization which promotes unity between conservative Reformed churches around the world.[1]Contents1 History 2 Denominational members 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The World Fellowship of Reformed Churches (WFRC) was formed in 1994 by the Presbyterian Church in America, the National Presbyterian Church in Mexico, and the Presbyterian Church of Brazil, as well a
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First Helvetic Confession
A confession is a statement – made by a person or by a group of persons – acknowledging some personal fact that the person (or the group) would ostensibly prefer to keep hidden. The term presumes that the speaker is providing information that he believes the other party is not already aware of,[1] and is frequently associated with an admission of a moral or legal wrong:In one sense it is the acknowledgment of having done something wrong, whether on purpose or not. Thus confessional texts usually provide information of a private nature previously unavailable. What a sinner tells a priest in the confessional, the documents criminals sign acknowledging what they have done, an autobiography in which the author acknowledges mistakes, and so on, are all examples of confessional texts.[2]Not all confessions reveal wrongdoing, however
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Savoy Declaration
The Savoy Declaration is a modification of the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646). Its full title is A Declaration of the Faith and Order owned and practiced in the Congregational
Congregational
Churches in England. It was drawn up in October 1658 by English Independents meeting at the Savoy Palace, London.Contents1 The Assembly 2 The Declaration 3 References 4 External linksThe Assembly[edit] The Savoy Assembly (not to be confused with the Savoy Conference
Savoy Conference
a few years later) met at the Savoy for eleven or twelve days from 12 October 1658. Representatives, mostly laymen, of over a hundred independent churches were present
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La Rochelle Confession
A confession is a statement – made by a person or by a group of persons – acknowledging some personal fact that the person (or the group) would ostensibly prefer to keep hidden. The term presumes that the speaker is providing information that he believes the other party is not already aware of,[1] and is frequently associated with an admission of a moral or legal wrong:In one sense it is the acknowledgment of having done something wrong, whether on purpose or not. Thus confessional texts usually provide information of a private nature previously unavailable. What a sinner tells a priest in the confessional, the documents criminals sign acknowledging what they have done, an autobiography in which the author acknowledges mistakes, and so on, are all examples of confessional texts.[2]Not all confessions reveal wrongdoing, however
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Heidelberg Catechism
The Heidelberg
Heidelberg
Catechism
Catechism
(1563), one of the Three Forms of Unity, is a Protestant
Protestant
confessional document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. It was written in 1563 in Heidelberg, present-day Germany. Its original title translates to Catechism, or Christian Instruction, according to the Usages of the Churches and Schools of the Electoral Palatinate. Commissioned by the prince-elector of the Electoral Palatinate, it is sometimes referred to as the "Palatinate Catechism." It has been translated into many languages and is regarded as one of the most influential of the Reformed catechisms.Contents1 History 2 Structure2.1 I. The Misery of Man 2.2 II. The Redemption (or Deliverance) of Man 2.3 III
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Second Helvetic Confession
The Helvetic Confessions are two documents expressing the common belief of the Reformed
Reformed
churches of Switzerland. The First Helvetic Confession (Latin: Confessio Helvetica prior), known also as the Second Confession of Basel, was drawn up in Basel
Basel
in 1536 by Heinrich Bullinger
Heinrich Bullinger
and Leo Jud of Zürich, Kaspar Megander (de) of Bern, Oswald Myconius
Oswald Myconius
and Simon Grynaeus of Basel, Martin Bucer
Martin Bucer
and Wolfgang Capito
Wolfgang Capito
of Strasbourg, with other representatives from Schaffhausen, St Gall, Mülhausen
Mülhausen
and Biel. The first draft was written in Latin
Latin
and the Zürich
Zürich
delegates objected to its Lutheran phraseology
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Canons Of Dort
The Canons of Dort, or Canons of Dordrecht, formally titled The Decision of the Synod of Dort
Synod of Dort
on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands, is the judgment of the National Synod held in the Dutch city of Dordrecht
Dordrecht
in 1618–19.[1] At the time, Dordrecht was often referred to in English as Dort or Dordt. Today the Canons of Dort
Canons of Dort
form part of the Three Forms of Unity, one of the confessional standards of many of the Reformed churches
Reformed churches
around the world, including the Netherlands, South Africa, Australia, and North America
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Scots Confession
The Scots Confession (also called the Scots Confession of 1560) is a Confession of Faith
Confession of Faith
written in 1560 by six leaders of the Protestant Reformation in Scotland. The Confession was the first subordinate standard for the Protestant church in Scotland. Along with the Book of Discipline and the Book of Common Order, this is considered to be a formational document for the Church of Scotland
Church of Scotland
during the time.[1] In August 1560 the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
agreed to reform the religion of the country. To enable them to decide what the Reformed Faith was to be, they set John Knox
John Knox
as the superintendent[2] over John Winram, John Spottiswoode, John Willock, John Douglas, and John Row, to prepare a Confession of Faith. This they did in four days
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Continental Reformed Church
A Continental Reformed
Reformed
church is a Reformed
Reformed
church that has its origin in the European continent. Prominent subgroups are the Dutch Reformed, the Swiss Reformed, the French Reformed
Reformed
(Huguenots), the Hungarian Reformed, and the Waldensian Church in Italy. The term is used to distinguish these churches from Presbyterian, Congregational or other Calvinist churches, which can trace their origin to the British Isles or elsewhere in the world. Continental Reformed
Reformed
churches are descended from the Protestant Reformation
Reformation
in respective European countries. Notably, their theology is largely derived from the Swiss Reformation, as Switzerland (specifically Geneva
Geneva
and Zürich) was a base for the most influential Reformed theologians of the era
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Belgic Confession
The Confession of Faith, popularly known as the Belgic Confession, is a doctrinal standard document to which many of the Reformed churches subscribe. The Confession forms part of the Three Forms of Unity
Three Forms of Unity
of the Reformed Church,[1] which are still the official subordinate standards of the Dutch Reformed Church.[2][3] The confession's chief author was Guido de Brès, a preacher of the Reformed churches
Reformed churches
of the Netherlands, who died a martyr to the faith in 1567.[4]Contents1 Terminology 2 Authorship and revisions 3 Composition 4 Editions and translations 5 Notes 6 ReferencesTerminology[edit] The name Belgic Confession
Belgic Confession
follows the seventeenth-century Latin designation Confessio Belgica
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William Farel
William Farel
William Farel
(1489 – 13 September 1565), Guilhem Farel or Guillaume Farel (French: [gijom faʁɛl]), was a French evangelist, and a founder of the Reformed
Reformed
Church in the cantons of Neuchâtel, Berne, Geneva, and Vaud in Switzerland. He is most often remembered for having persuaded John Calvin
John Calvin
to remain in Geneva
Geneva
in 1536,[1] and for persuading him to return there in 1541,[2] after their expulsion in 1538
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