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California State University, Fullerton
California State University, Fullerton
California State University, Fullerton
(CSUF or Cal State Fullerton) is a public research university located in Fullerton, California. With a total enrollment of about 40,400, it has the largest student body out of the 23-campus California State University
California State University
(CSU) system, and its approximately 5,800 graduate student body is also the largest in the CSU and one of the largest in all of California
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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African American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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Financial Endowment
A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust
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Mass Shooting
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculicide (Nepoticide) Familicide M
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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature"[1][2][3]) is the natural science that studies matter[4] and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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Futurist Architecture
Futurist architecture
Futurist architecture
is an early-20th century form of architecture born in Italy, characterized by strong chromaticism, long dynamic lines, suggesting speed, motion, urgency and lyricism: it was a part of Futurism, an artistic movement founded by the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, who produced its first manifesto, the Manifesto of Futurism in 1909. The movement attracted not only poets, musicians, and artists (such as Umberto Boccioni, Giacomo Balla, Fortunato Depero, and Enrico Prampolini) but also a number of architects. A cult of the machine age and even a glorification of war and violence were among the themes of the Futurists (several prominent futurists were killed after volunteering to fight in World War
War
I)
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Googie
Googie (/ˈɡuːɡi/ GOO-gee[1]) architecture is a form of modern architecture, a subdivision of futurist architecture influenced by car culture, jets, the Space Age, and the Atomic Age.[2] Originating in Southern California during the late 1940s and continuing approximately into the mid-1960s, Googie-themed architecture was popular among motels, coffee houses and gas stations. The style later became widely known as part of the Mid-century modern style, elements of which represent the populuxe aesthetic,[3][4] as in Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center. The term "Googie" comes from a now-defunct cafe in Hollywood[5] designed by John Lautner.[6] Similar architectural styles are also referred to as Populuxe or Doo Wop.[7][8] Features of Googie include upswept roofs, curvaceous, geometric shapes, and bold use of glass, steel and neon
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Satellite Campus
A satellite campus or branch campus is a campus of a college or university that is physically at a distance from the original university or college area. This branch campus may be located in a different city, state, or country, and is often smaller than the main campus of an institution. The separate campuses may be under the same accreditation and share resources or they share administrations but maintain separate budgets, resources, and other governing bodies. In many cases, satellite campuses are intended to serve students who cannot travel far from home for college because of family responsibilities, their jobs, financial limitations, or other factors. The availability of branch campuses may increase higher education enrollment by nontraditional students.[1] Electronic communications technology has helped to facilitate the operation of satellite campuses
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White American
English Albanian  · Arabic  · American Sign Language
American Sign Language
 · Neo-Aramaic  · Armenian  · Azerbaijani  · Belarusian  · Czech  · Danish  · Dutch  · Finnish  · French  · German  · Greek  · Hebrew  · Hungarian  · Italian  · Kurdish  · Ladino  · Lithuanian  · Norwegian  · Pashto  · Persian  · Polish  · Portuguese  · Romanian  · Russian  · Slovak  · South Slavic  · Spanish  · Swedish  · Tamazight  · Tur
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Hispanics In The United States
Hispanic
Hispanic
Americans
Americans
and Latino Americans
Americans
(Spanish: Estadounidenses hispanos; [isˈpanos]) are people in the United States
United States
who are descendants of people from countries of Latin America
Latin America
and Spain.[6][7][8] The United States
United States
has the largest population of Latinos and Hispanics outside of Latin America
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Telegram
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Multiracial
Multiracial
Multiracial
is defined as made up of or relating to people of many races.[1] Many terms exist for people of various multiracial backgrounds. While some of the terms used in the past are considered insulting and offensive, there are many modern terms that multiracial people identify with. These include mixed-race (or simply "mixed"), biracial, multiracial, multiethnic, polyethnic, half, half-and-half, métis, creole, mestizo, mulatto, melungeon, criollo, chindian, dougla, quadroon, zambo, eurasian, hāfu, garifuna and pardo. Individuals of multiracial backgrounds make up a significant portion of the population in many parts of the world. In North America, studies have found that the multiracial population is continuing to grow. In many countries of Latin America
Latin America
and the Caribbean, mixed-race people make up the majority of the population
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College And University Rankings
College and university rankings
College and university rankings
are rankings of institutions in higher education which have been ranked on the basis of various combinations of various factors. Rankings have most often been conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments, or academics. In addition to ranking entire institutions, organizations perform rankings of specific programs, departments, and schools. Various rankings consider combinations of measures of funding and endowment, research excellence and/or influence, specialization expertise, admissions, student options, award numbers, internationalization, graduate employment, industrial linkage, historical reputation and other criteria. Various rankings mostly evaluating on institutional output by research. Some rankings evaluate institutions within a single country, while others assess institutions worldwide
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Forbes Magazine's List Of America's Best Colleges
In 2008, Forbes.com began publishing an annual list, prepared by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity[1] of "America's Best Colleges".[2] Student satisfaction (evaluations from RateMyProfessors.com, retention rates and targeted student satisfaction surveys on Facebook) constitutes 75% of the score. Post-graduate success (self-reported salaries of alumni from PayScale, alumni appearing on the CCAP's America's Leaders List) constitutes 32.5% of the score. Student debt loads constitute 25% of the score. The graduation rate (the proportion of students who complete four-year degrees in four years) constitutes 7.5% of the score. Academic success (the proportion of students receiving nationally competitive awards) constitutes 10% of the score. Public reputation is not considered, which causes some colleges to score lower than in other lists
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