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California Gold Rush
The California
California
Gold
Gold
Rush (1848–1855) began on January 24, 1848, when gold was found by James W. Marshall
James W. Marshall
at Sutter's Mill
Sutter's Mill
in Coloma, California.[1] The news of gold brought some 300,000 people to California
California
from the rest of the United States
United States
and abroad.[2] The sudden influx of immigration and gold into the money supply reinvigorated the American economy, and California
California
became one of the few American states to go directly to statehood without first being a territory, in the Compromise of 1850. The Gold
Gold
Rush had severe effects on Native Californians and resulted in a precipitous population decline from disease, genocide and starvation
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Steamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines[1] that typically drive (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw). As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steam ship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels. As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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Hawaiian Islands
The Hawaiian Islands
Hawaiian Islands
(Hawaiian: Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the "Sandwich Islands", a name chosen by James Cook
James Cook
in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty
First Lord of the Admiralty
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii
Hawaii
Island. The Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown in 1893. The islands were subsequently put under the control of a republic, which the United States annexed in 1898.[1] The U.S. state
U.S

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Hawaii
Coordinates: 21°18′41″N 157°47′47″W / 21.31139°N 157.79639°W / 21.31139; -157.79639State of Hawaii Mokuʻāina o Hawaiʻi  (Hawaiian)Flag SealNickname(s): The Aloha State (official), Paradise of the Pacific,[1] The Islands of AlohaMotto(s): Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ʻĀina i ka Pono ("The Life of the Land is Perpetuated in Righteousness")[2]State song(s): "Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī (Hawaiʻi's Own True Sons)[3]"Official language English, HawaiianDemonym Hawaiian[a]Capital (and largest city) HonoluluLargest metro Island of OahuArea Ranked 43rd • Total 10,931 sq mi (28,311 km2) • Width n/a miles (n/a km) • Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km) • % water 41.2 •
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Latin America
Latin
Latin
America[a] is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Spanish, French and Portuguese are spoken. The term originated in the French government in the mid-19th century as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas
Americas
(Haiti, French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed. It is, therefore, broader than the terms Ibero-America
Ibero-America
or Hispanic
Hispanic
America. The term excludes French Canada and modern French Louisiana. Latin
Latin
America consists of nineteen sovereign states and several territories and dependencies which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico
Mexico
to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean
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Gila River
The Gila River
Gila River
(/ˈhiːlə/; O'odham [Pima]: Keli Akimel or simply Akimel, Quechan: Haa Siʼil) is a 649-mile (1,044 km)[2] tributary of the Colorado River
Colorado River
flowing through New Mexico
New Mexico
and Arizona in the United States. The river drains an arid watershed of nearly 60,000 square miles (160,000 km2) that lies mainly within the U.S. but also extends into northern Sonora, Mexico. Indigenous peoples have lived along the river for at least 2,000 years, establishing complex agricultural societies before European exploration of the region began in the 16th century
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Reagan Era
The Reagan Era
Reagan Era
or Age of Reagan is a periodization of recent American history used by historians and political observers to emphasize that the conservative "Reagan Revolution" led by President Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
in domestic and foreign policy had a lasting impact. It overlaps with what political scientists call the Sixth Party System. Definitions of the Reagan Era
Reagan Era
universally include the 1980s, while more extensive definitions may also include the late 1970s, the 1990s, the 2000s (decade), and even the 2010s. In his 2008 book, The Age of Reagan: A History, 1974–2008, historian and journalist Sean Wilentz argues that Reagan dominated this stretch of American history in the same way that Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Great Depression In The United States
The Great Depression
Great Depression
began in August 1929, when the United States economy first went into an economic recession. Although the country spent two months with declining GDP, it was not until the Wall Street Crash in October 1929 that the effects of a declining economy were felt, and a major worldwide economic downturn ensued. The market crash marked the beginning of a decade of high unemployment, poverty, low profits, deflation, plunging farm incomes, and lost opportunities for economic growth and personal advancement. Although its causes are still uncertain and controversial, the net effect was a sudden and general loss of confidence in the economic future
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Roaring Twenties
The Roaring Twenties
Roaring Twenties
was the period of Western society and Western culture that occurred during and around the 1920s. It was a period of sustained economic prosperity with a distinctive cultural edge in the United States
United States
and Western Europe, particularly in major cities such as Berlin,[1] Chicago,[2] London,[3] Los Angeles,[4] New York City,[5] Paris,[6] and Sydney.[7] In the French Third Republic, the decade was known as the "années folles" ("Crazy Years"),[8] emphasizing the era's social, artistic and cultural dynamism
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Progressive Era
The Progressive Era was a period of widespread social activism and political reform across the United States that spanned from the 1890s to the 1920s.[1] The main objectives of the Progressive movement were eliminating problems caused by industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and corruption in government. The movement primarily targeted political machines and their bosses. By taking down these corrupt representatives in office a further means of direct democracy would be established
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Gilded Age
The Gilded Age
The Gilded Age
in United States
United States
history is the late 19th century, from the 1870s to about 1900. The term for this period came into use in the 1920s and 1930s and was derived from writer Mark Twain's 1873 novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, which satirized an era of serious social problems masked by a thin gold gilding. The early half of the Gilded Age
Gilded Age
roughly coincided with the middle portion of the Victorian era in Britain and the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
in France. Its beginning in the years after the American Civil War
American Civil War
overlaps the Reconstruction Era (which ended in 1877),[1]. It was followed in the 1890s by the Progressive Era. The Gilded Age
The Gilded Age
was an era of rapid economic growth, especially in the North and West
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Reconstruction Era
The Reconstruction
Reconstruction
era was the period from 1863 (the legal end of most slavery in the United States) or 1865 (the end of the Confederacy) to 1877. In the context of the history of the United States, the term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history of the entire country from 1865 to 1877 following the Civil War; the second, to the attempted transformation of the 11 ex-Confederate states from 1863 to 1877, as directed by Congress. Reconstruction
Reconstruction
ended the remnants of Confederate nationalism and of slavery, making the Freedmen
Freedmen
citizens with civil rights apparently guaranteed by three new Constitutional amendments
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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