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Caleta Godoy Formation
Caleta Godoy Formation (Spanish: Formación Caleta Godoy) is a geological formation whose main outcrops lie around Chacao Channel
Chacao Channel
in southern Chile. The formation overlies Bahía Mansa Metamorphic Complex and Santo Domingo Formation.[1][2] Caleta Godoy's strata are always found horizontally even in places where the underlying Santo Domingo Formation have its strata tilted 90 degrees (angular unconformity). The formation contains mollusc fossils and ichnofossils of Ophiomorpha
Ophiomorpha
and Planolites
Planolites
can be observed. Caleta Godoy Formation was deposited in a shallow marine environment during a small marine transgression different from that associated with Santo Domingo Formation
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Geochronology
Geochronology
Geochronology
is the science of determining the age of rocks, fossils, and sediments using signatures inherent in the rocks themselves. Absolute geochronology can be accomplished through radioactive isotopes, whereas relative geochronology is provided by tools such as palaeomagnetism and stable isotope ratios. By combining multiple geochronological (and biostratigraphic) indicators the precision of the recovered age can be improved. Geochronology
Geochronology
is different in application from biostratigraphy, which is the science of assigning sedimentary rocks to a known geological period via describing, cataloguing and comparing fossil floral and faunal assemblages. Biostratigraphy
Biostratigraphy
does not directly provide an absolute age determination of a rock, but merely places it within an interval of time at which that fossil assemblage is known to have coexisted
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Chiloé Block
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Planolites
Planolites
Planolites
is an ichnogenus found throughout the Phanerozoic. It is generally small 1–5 mm (0.039–0.197 in), unlined, and rarely branched, with fill that differs from the host rock. Planolites are trace fossils made during the feeding process of ancient wormlike animals. See also[edit] List of Ediacaran generaThis trace fossil-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis Ediacaran biota-related article is a stub
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Marine Transgression
A marine transgression is a geologic event during which sea level rises relative to the land and the shoreline moves toward higher ground, resulting in flooding. Transgressions can be caused either by the land sinking or the ocean basins filling with water (or decreasing in capacity). Transgressions and regressions may be caused by tectonic events such as orogenies, severe climate change such as ice ages or isostatic adjustments following removal of ice or sediment load. During the Cretaceous, seafloor spreading created a relatively shallow Atlantic
Atlantic
basin at the expense of deeper Pacific basin. This reduced the world's ocean basin capacity and caused a rise in sea level worldwide
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Pliocene
The Pliocene
Pliocene
( /ˈplaɪəˌsiːn/;[2][3] also Pleiocene[4]) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58[5] million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Pliocene
Pliocene
follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Epoch. Prior to the 2009 revision of the geologic time scale, which placed the four most recent major glaciations entirely within the Pleistocene, the Pliocene
Pliocene
also included the Gelasian stage, which lasted from 2.588 to 1.806 million years ago, and is now included in the Pleistocene.[6] As with other older geologic periods, the geological strata that define the start and end are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain
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Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
is a basement unit underlying the central Andes
Andes
in northwestern Argentina, western Bolivia, northern Chile and southern Peru. Geologically it corresponds to a craton,[1] terrane[2] or block[2][3] of continental crust. Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
collided and amalgamated with the Amazonian craton about 1000 Ma ago during the Sunsás orogeny.[3] As a terrane Arequipa-Antofalla
Arequipa-Antofalla
was ribbon-shaped during the Paleozoic, a time when it was bounded by the west by the Iapetus Ocean
Iapetus Ocean
and by the east by the Puncoviscana Ocean.[2] References[edit]^ Casquet, C.; Pankhurst, R.J.; Rapela, C.W.; Galindo, C.; Fanning, C.M.; Chiaradia, M.; Baldo, E.; González-Casado, J.M.; Dahlquist, J.A. (2008)
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Chilenia
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Cuyania
Central Andean PatagonianBatholithsPeruvian Coastal North Patagonian South PatagonianSubducted structures Antarctic Plate
Antarctic Plate
Carnegie Ridge
Carnegie Ridge

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Angular Unconformity
An unconformity is a buried erosional or non-depositional surface separating two rock masses or strata of different ages, indicating that sediment deposition was not continuous. In general, the older layer was exposed to erosion for an interval of time before deposition of the younger, but the term is used to describe any break in the sedimentary geologic record. The significance of angular unconformity (see below) was shown by James Hutton, who found examples of Hutton's Unconformity
Unconformity
at Jedburgh
Jedburgh
in 1787 and at Siccar Point
Siccar Point
in 1788.[1][2] The rocks above an unconformity are younger than the rocks beneath (unless the sequence has been overturned). An unconformity represents time during which no sediments were preserved in a region. The local record for that time interval is missing and geologists must use other clues to discover that part of the geologic history of that area
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Lacui Formation
Lacui Formation
Lacui Formation
(Spanish: Formación Lacui) is a marine Miocene sedimentary formation located in Chiloé Island
Chiloé Island
with minor outcrops near Carelmapu
Carelmapu
on the mainland.[1][2] Gastropod shells are the most common macrofossils of Lacui Formation.[2] According to Sernageomin (1998) the formation dates to the earliest Serravallian — that is the Middle Miocene.[2] See also[edit]Lacuy Peninsula Navidad Formation Santo Domingo FormationReferences[edit]^ Charrier, R.; Pinto, L.; Rodríguez, M.P. (2007). "Tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Andean Orogen in Chile". In Moreno, Teresa; Gibbons, Wes. The Geology of Chile. Geological Society of London. pp. 92–96.  ^ a b c Finger, Kenneth L
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Mejillones Peninsula
Mejillones
Mejillones
Peninsula (Spanish: península de Mejillones) protudes from the coast of northern Chile north of Antofagasta
Antofagasta
and south of the port of Mejillones. The basement rocks of the peninsula are made of metamorphic and igneous rocks that formed in the Late Triassic plus plutons formed in the Early Jurassic.[1] The eastern part of the peninsula hosts various normal faults.[2] Extensional tectonics
Extensional tectonics
in the peninsula begun no later than in the Early Miocene
Miocene
and has resulted in the formation of two half graben basins
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Tectonic Evolution Of Patagonia
Patagonia
Patagonia
comprises the southernmost region of South America, portions of which lie either side of the Chile–Argentina border
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Cenozoic
The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era ( /ˌsiːnəˈzoʊɪk, ˌsɛ-/)[1][2] is the current geological era, covering the period from 66 million years ago to the present day. The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
is also known as the Age of Mammals, because of the large mammals that dominate it. The continents also moved into their current positions during this era.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Divisions2.1 Paleogene Period 2.2 Neogene 2.3 Quaternary3 Animal life 4 Tectonics 5 Climate 6 Life 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksNomenclature[edit] Cenozoic, meaning "new life," is derived from Greek καινός kainós "new," and ζωή zōḗ "life."[3] The era is also known as the Cænozoic, Caenozoic, or Cainozoic
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Neogene
The Neogene
Neogene
( /ˈniːəˌdʒiːn/)[6][7] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary
Quaternary
Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene
Neogene
is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene
Miocene
and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene
Neogene
cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged. Early hominids, the ancestors of humans, appeared in Africa near the end of the period
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