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Caiaphas
Joseph Caiaphas, known simply as Caiaphas
Caiaphas
(Hebrew: יוֹסֵף בַּר קַיָּפָא‬; Greek: Καϊάφας) in the New Testament, was the Jewish high priest who is said to have organized the plot to kill Jesus. Caiaphas
Caiaphas
is also said to have been involved in the Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
trial of Jesus.[1] The primary sources for Caiaphas' life are the New Testament
New Testament
and the writings of Josephus
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Messiah
In Abrahamic religions, the Messiah
Messiah
or Messias (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. māšîaḥ; Greek: μεσσίας, translit. messías, Arabic: مسيح‎, translit. masîḥ) is a saviour or liberator of a group of people. The concepts of Moshiach, Messianism, and of a Messianic Age originated in Judaism,[1][2] and in the Hebrew Bible; a moshiach (messiah) is a king or High Priest traditionally anointed with holy anointing oil.[3] However, messiahs were not exclusively Jewish, as the
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Valley Of Elah
The Valley of Elah, Ella Valley, "the valley of the terebinth" [1] (Hebrew: עמק האלה‬ Emek HaElah; Arabic: وادي السنط‎, Wadi es-Sunt), so called after the large and shady terebinth trees (Pistacia atlantica) which are indigenous to its parts, and best known as the place described in the Bible where the Israelites were encamped when David
David
fought Goliath
Goliath
(1 Sam. 17:2, 19). It was near Azekah
Azekah
and Socho (17:1). On the west side of the valley, near Socho, there is a very large and ancient tree of this kind, 55 feet in height, its trunk 17 feet in circumference, and the breadth of its shade no less than 75 feet. It marks the upper end of the valley, and forms a noted object, being one of the largest terebinths in the area
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List Of Forests In Israel
The forests of contemporary Israel
Israel
are mainly the result of a massive afforestation campaign by the Jewish National Fund
Jewish National Fund
(JNF). This article is a list of these forests. After the creation of the state of Israel, the newly formed state needed to hide all trace of the Palestinians destroyed villages, hence the new state of Israel
Israel
came up with an alibi claiming that in the 19th Century and up to World War I, the Ottoman empire
Ottoman empire
cleared the land of Palestine of its natural reserves of pine and oak trees, in order to build railways across the empire.[citation needed] Since it was founded the JNF has planted in Israel
Israel
more than 185 million trees creating 280 forests to hide most Palestinians destroyed villages, and still operates today.[1]In most countries people are born to forests, and forests are given to them by nature
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Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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Aramaic Language
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Bar-Ilan University
Bar-Ilan University
Bar-Ilan University
(Hebrew: אוניברסיטת בר-אילן‬ Universitat Bar-Ilan) is a public research university in the city of Ramat Gan
Ramat Gan
in the Tel Aviv District, Israel. Established in 1955, Bar Ilan is Israel's second-largest academic institution. It has nearly 26,800 students (including 9,000 students in its affiliated regional colleges) and 1,350 faculty members. The university aims to "blend tradition with modern technologies and scholarship, and teach the compelling ethics of Jewish heritage to all..
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Tel Aviv University
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
University (TAU) (Hebrew: אוּנִיבֶרְסִיטַת תֵּל-אָבִיב‬ Universitat Tel Aviv) is a public research university in the neighborhood of Ramat Aviv
Ramat Aviv
in Tel Aviv, Israel
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Israel Antiquities Authority
The Israel
Israel
Antiquities Authority (IAA, Hebrew: רשות העתיקות‎, translit. rashut ha-'atiqot; Arabic: داﺌرة الآثار‎, before 1990, the Israel
Israel
Department of Antiquities) is an independent Israeli governmental authority responsible for enforcing the 1978 Law of Antiquities. The IAA regulates excavation and conservation, and promotes research
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Sanhedrin
The Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
(Greek: Συνέδριον,[1] synedrion, "sitting together," hence "assembly" or "council") was an assembly of twenty-three or seventy-one rabbis appointed to sit as a tribunal in every city in the ancient Land of Israel. There were two classes of rabbinical courts called Sanhedrin, the Great Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
and the Lesser Sanhedrin. A lesser Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
of 23 judges was appointed to each city, but there was to be only one Great Sanhedrin
Sanhedrin
of 71 judges, which among other roles acted as the Supreme Court, taking appeals from cases decided by lesser courts
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Priestly Divisions
Four gifts given in Jerusalem 11. Firstborn animal · 12. Firstfruits 13. Burnt offering (Judaism) · 14. Parts of the thank offering and Nazirite's offering Ten gifts given (even) outside of Jerusalem 15. Heave offering 16. Heave offering of the Levite's tithe 17. Dough offering 18. First shearing of the sheep 19. Shoulder, cheeks and maw 20. Coins for redemption of the first born son · 21. Redemption of a donkey  · 22. Dedication of property to a priest  · 23. Field not redeemed in a Jubilee year · 24
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David
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
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Blasphemy
Blasphemy
Blasphemy
is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence to a deity, to religious or holy persons or sacred things, or toward something considered sacred or inviolable.[1][2][3][4] Some religions consider blasphemy to be a religious crime.[5] As of 2012, anti-blasphemy laws existed in 32 countries, while 87 nations had hate speech laws that covered defamation of religion and public expression of hate against a religious group.[6] Anti-blasphemy laws are particularly common in Muslim-majority nations, such as those in the Middle East and North Africa,[6] although they are also present in some
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Giotto
Giotto
Giotto
di Bondone[1] (c. 1267 – January 8, 1337),[2][3] known mononymously as Giotto
Giotto
(Italian: [ˈdʒɔtto]) and Latinised as Giottus, was an Italian painter and architect from Florence
Florence
during the Late Middle Ages
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Padua
Padua
Padua
(/ˈpædjuə/ or US: /ˈpædʒuə/, Italian: Padova [ˈpaːdova] ( listen); Venetian: Pàdova) is a city and comune in Veneto, northern Italy. It is the capital of the province of Padua
Padua
and the economic and communications hub of the area. Padua's population is 214,000 (as of 2011[update]). The city is sometimes included, with Venice
Venice
(Italian Venezia) and Treviso, in the Padua-Treviso- Venice
Venice
Metropolitan Area, which has a population of c. 1,600,000. Padua
Padua
stands on the Bacchiglione
Bacchiglione
River, 40 kilometres (25 miles) west of Venice
Venice
and 29 km (18 miles) southeast of Vicenza. The Brenta River, which once ran through the city, still touches the northern districts. Its agricultural setting is the Venetian Plain (Pianura Veneta)
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