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Caelian Hill
The Caelian Hill
Caelian Hill
(/ˈsiːliən/; Latin: Collis Caelius; Italian: Celio [ˈtʃɛːljo]) is one of the famous Seven Hills of Rome, Italy. Under reign of Tullus Hostilius, the entire population of Alba Longa
Alba Longa
was forcibly resettled on the Caelian Hill.[1] According to a tradition recounted by Titus Livy, the hill received its name from Caelius Vibenna, either because he established a settlement there or because his friend Servius Tullius
Servius Tullius
wished to honor him after his death. In Republican-era Rome
Rome
the Caelian Hill
Caelian Hill
was a fashionable residential district and the site of residences of the wealthy. Archaeological work under the Baths of Caracalla
Baths of Caracalla
have uncovered the remains of lavish villas complete with murals and mosaics
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Cispius
Cispius is the nomen of the Roman gens Cispia.Contents1 Cispius Laevus 2 M. Cispius 3 L. Cispius (Laevus) 4 See also 5 References Cispius Laevus[edit] The Mons Cispius, or Cispian Hill, is one of several summits of the Esquiline Hill
Esquiline Hill
in Rome. The grammarian Festus says that it was named for a Cispius Laevus of Anagnia, of the Publilia voting tribe (tribus). This Cispius may be legendary.[1] M. Cispius[edit] Marcus Cispius was a tribune of the plebs in 57 BC, and was among those tribunes who actively supported Cicero
Cicero
in his efforts to overturn the legislation that brought about his exile.[2] Earlier, however, Cicero
Cicero
had brought a civil suit in which he spoke against Cispius, his brother, and their father
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Ponte Sisto
Ponte Sisto
Ponte Sisto
is a bridge in Rome's historic centre, spanning the river Tiber. It connects Via dei Pettinari in the Rione of Regola to Piazza Trilussa in Trastevere. The construction of the current bridge occurred between 1473 and 1479, and was commissioned by Pope Sixtus IV (r
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Basilica
A basilica is a type of building, usually a church, that is typically rectangular with a central nave and aisles, usually with a slightly raised platform and an apse at one or both ends. In Europe and the Americas it is the most common architectural style for churches though this building plan has become less dominant in new buildings since the later 20th century. Today the term basilica is often used to refer to any large, ornate church building, especially Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox, even if it does not strictly follow this style. The basilican architectural style originated in ancient Rome and was originally used for public buildings where courts were held, as well as serving other official and public functions. The basilica was centrally located in every Roman town, usually adjacent to the main forum
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Titus Livy
Titus Livius Patavinus (Classical Latin: [ˈtɪ.tʊs ˈliː.wi.ʊs]; 64 or 59 BC – AD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Livy /ˈlɪvi/ in English language sources – was a Roman historian. He wrote a monumental history of Rome and the Roman people – Ab Urbe Condita Libri (Books from the Foundation of the City) – covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome before the traditional foundation in 753 BC through the reign of Augustus in Livy's own lifetime. He was on familiar terms with members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, advising Augustus's grandnephew, the future emperor Claudius, as a young man not long before 14 AD in a letter to take up the writing of history.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Reception3.1 Imperial era 3.2 Later4 Dates 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] Livy was born Titus Livius in Patavium in northern Italy, now modern Padua
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Pons Cestius
The Pons Cestius
Pons Cestius
(Italian: Ponte Cestio, meaning "Cestius' Bridge") is a Roman stone bridge in Rome, Italy, spanning the Tiber
Tiber
to the west of the Tiber
Tiber
Island. The original version of this bridge was built around the 1st century BC (some time between 62 and 27 BC), after the Pons Fabricius, sited on the other side of island. Both the pontes Cestius and Fabricius were long-living bridges; however, whereas the Fabricius remains wholly intact, the Ponte Cestio was partly dismantled in the 19th century, with only some of the ancient structure preserved. The Pons Cestius
Pons Cestius
is the first bridge that reached the right bank of Tiber
Tiber
from the Tiber
Tiber
Island
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Pons Fabricius
The Pons Fabricius
Pons Fabricius
(Italian: Ponte Fabricio, meaning "Fabricius' Bridge") or Ponte dei Quattro Capi, is the oldest Roman bridge
Roman bridge
in Rome, Italy, still existing in its original state.[1] Built in 62 BC, it spans half of the Tiber
Tiber
River, from the Campus Martius on the east side to Tiber Island
Tiber Island
in the middle (the Pons Cestius
Pons Cestius
is west of the island). Quattro Capi ("four heads") refers to the two marble pillars of the two-faced Janus herms on the parapet, which were moved here from the nearby Church of St Gregory (Monte Savello) in the 14th century.[2] According to Dio Cassius, the bridge was built in 62 BC, the year after Cicero
Cicero
was consul, to replace an earlier wooden bridge destroyed by fire
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Ponte Milvio
The Milvian (or Mulvian) Bridge
Bridge
(Italian: Ponte Molle or Ponte Milvio, Latin: Pons Milvius or Pons Mulvius) is a bridge over the Tiber
Tiber
in northern Rome, Italy. It was an economically and strategically important bridge in the era of the Roman Empire and was the site of the famous Battle of the Milvian Bridge.Contents1 Early history 2 Recent history 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksEarly history[edit] A bridge was built by consul Gaius Claudius Nero
Gaius Claudius Nero
in 206 BC after he had defeated the Carthaginian army in the Battle of the Metaurus. In 109 BC, censor Marcus Aemilius Scaurus built a new bridge[1] of stone in the same position, demolishing the old one
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Tullus Hostilius
Tullus Hostilius
Tullus Hostilius
(r. 673–642 BC) was the legendary third king of Rome. He succeeded Numa Pompilius
Numa Pompilius
and was succeeded by Ancus Marcius. Unlike his predecessor, Tullus was known as a warlike king.[1] Tullus Hostilius
Tullus Hostilius
was the grandson of Hostus Hostilius, who had fought with Romulus
Romulus
and died during the Sabine invasion of Rome.[2] The principal feature of Tullus' reign was his defeat of Alba Longa. After Alba Longa
Alba Longa
was beaten (by the victory of three Roman champions over three Albans), Alba Longa
Alba Longa
became Rome's vassal state
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Ponte Sant'Angelo
Ponte Sant'Angelo, once the Aelian Bridge
Bridge
or Pons Aelius, meaning the Bridge
Bridge
of Hadrian, is a Roman bridge
Roman bridge
in Rome, Italy, completed in 134 AD by Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
Hadrian, to span the Tiber, from the city center to his newly constructed mausoleum, now the towering Castel Sant'Angelo. The bridge is faced with travertine marble and spans the Tiber
Tiber
with five arches, three of which are Roman; it was approached by means of ramp from the river. The bridge is now solely pedestrian, and provides a scenic view of Castel Sant'Angelo
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List Of Bridges In Rome
This is an incomplete list of bridges in the city of Rome, in Italy:Ponte di Castel Giubileo (built 1951) Confluenza del fiume Aniene nel Tevere Ponte di Tor di Quinto (1960) Ponte Cestio
Ponte Cestio
(1st century BC), also called Ponte San Bartolomeo Ponte Flaminio (1932-1951) Ponte Milvio
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Livy
Titus Livius Patavinus (Classical Latin: [ˈtɪ.tʊs ˈliː.wi.ʊs]; 64 or 59 BC – AD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Livy
Livy
/ˈlɪvi/ in English language
English language
sources – was a Roman historian. He wrote a monumental history of Rome
Rome
and the Roman people – Ab Urbe Condita Libri (Books from the Foundation of the City) – covering the period from the earliest legends of Rome
Rome
before the traditional foundation in 753 BC through the reign of Augustus
Augustus
in Livy's own lifetime
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Churches Of Rome
Church
Church
most commonly refers to:Christian Church, body of Christians, taken as a whole Church
Church
(congregation), a local congregation of a Christian denomination
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