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Cadwgan Ap Bleddyn
Cadwgan ap Bleddyn
Cadwgan ap Bleddyn
(1051–1111) was a prince of the Kingdom of Powys (Welsh: Teyrnas Powys) in eastern Wales. Cadwgan was the second son of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn who was king of both Powys and Gwynedd. When Bleddyn was killed in 1075, Powys was divided between three of his sons, Cadwgan, Iorwerth and Maredudd. Cadwgan is first heard of in 1088 when he attacked Deheubarth, forcing its king, Rhys ap Tewdwr, to flee to Ireland. However Rhys returned later the same year with a fleet from Ireland
Ireland
and defeated the men of Powys in a battle in which two of Cadwgan's nephews, Madog and Rhiryd, were killed. When Rhys ap Tewdwr
Rhys ap Tewdwr
was killed in 1093, Cadwgan again attacked Deheubarth, but it soon became clear that it was the Normans
Normans
who would benefit from the death of Rhys
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Kingdom Of Powys
The Kingdom of Powys
Powys
was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
following the end of Roman rule in Britain. It very roughly covered the top two thirds of the modern county of Powys
Powys
and part of the West Midlands (see map). More precisely, and based on the Romano-British tribal lands of the Ordovices
Ordovices
in the west and the Cornovii in the east, its boundaries originally extended from the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
in the west to include the modern West Midlands region of England in the east
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Robert Of Bellême, 3rd Earl Of Shrewsbury
Robert de Bellême
Bellême
(c. 1056– after 1130), seigneur de Bellême
Bellême
(or Belèsme), seigneur de Montgomery, viscount of the Hiémois, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury and Count of Ponthieu, was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, and one of the most prominent figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy
Normandy
between the sons of William the Conqueror. He was a member of the powerful House of Bellême. Robert became notorious for his alleged cruelty. The chronicler Orderic Vitalis
Orderic Vitalis
calls him "Grasping and cruel, an implacable persecutor of the Church of God and the poor..
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Mathrafal
Bleddyn ap Cynfyn Maredudd ap Bleddyn Madog ap Maredudd Owain Cyfeiliog Gwenwynwyn
Gwenwynwyn
ap OwainSite notesExcavation dates 1991Archaeologists University of YorkCondition Ruin - mainly earthworks remaining Mathrafal
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John Edward Lloyd
Sir John Edward Lloyd (who wrote as J. E. Lloyd) (5 May 1861 – 20 June 1947), was a Welsh historian, the author of the first serious history of the country's formative years, A History of Wales
Wales
from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest, 2 vols. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1911; Second edition 1912; Third edition 1939. Another of his great works was Owen Glendower: Owen Glyn Dŵr, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1931. For his achievements in the field, he was knighted in 1934
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Welshpool
Welshpool
Welshpool
(Welsh: Y Trallwng) is a town in Wales, historically in the county of Montgomeryshire, but currently administered as part of the unitary authority of Powys. The town is situated 4 miles (6 km) from the Wales–England border
Wales–England border
and low-lying on the River Severn; its Welsh language
Welsh language
name Y Trallwng literally means "the marshy or sinking land"
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Madog Ap Rhiryd
Madog ap Rhiryd was a 12th-century Welsh prince of part of Powys. His birth and death dates are unknown. He was a son of Rhiryd ap Bleddyn. In 1110 he allied himself with his cousin, Owain ap Cadwgan, against Henry I of England. After Henry stripped Owain of his title and replaced him with Iorwerth ap Bleddyn, their uncle, Madog killed Iorwerth in 1111. When Owain's father, Cadwgan, was also killed by Madog at Welshpool the same year, Owain became ruler of much of Powys. He employed his uncle Maredudd ap Bleddyn as penteulu (captain of the guard). In 1113 Maredudd captured Madog and sent him to Owain. Owain took vengeance for the killing of his father by gouging out Madog's eyes. Nothing more of him is known to history. References[edit]John Edward Lloyd (1911). A history of Wales: from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest
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Henry I Of England
Henry I (c. 1068 – 1 December 1135), also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England
King of England
from 1100 to his death. Henry was the fourth son of William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and was educated in Latin
Latin
and the liberal arts. On William's death in 1087, Henry's elder brothers Robert Curthose
Robert Curthose
and William Rufus
William Rufus
inherited Normandy and England, respectively, but Henry was left landless. Henry purchased the County of Cotentin
Cotentin
in western Normandy from Robert, but William and Robert deposed him in 1091. Henry gradually rebuilt his power base in the Cotentin
Cotentin
and allied himself with William against Robert
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Vill
Vill is a term used in English history to describe the basic rural land unit, roughly comparable to that of a parish, manor, or tithing.Contents1 Medieval developments 2 Legal and other usage 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksMedieval developments[edit] The vill was the smallest territorial and administrative unit - a geographical subdivision of the hundred and county.[1] - in Anglo-Saxon England; and served both a policing function through the tithing, and the economic function of organising common projects through the village moot.[2] The vill remained the basic rural unit after the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
- land units in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
are frequently referred to as vills[3] - and into the late medieval era
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Richard De Beaumis (died 1127)
Richard de Belmeis I
Richard de Belmeis I
(or de Beaumais) (died 1127) was a medieval cleric, administrator, judge and politician. Beginning as a minor landowner and steward in Shropshire, he became Henry I's chief agent in the Welsh Marches
Welsh Marches
and in 1108 Bishop of London. He founded St Osyth's Priory in Essex
Essex
and was succeeded by a considerable dynasty of clerical politicians and landowners.Contents1 Identity 2 Background and early life 3 Viceroy of Shropshire 4 Bishop of London4.1 Election and consecration 4.2 Primacy dispute 4.3 Episcopal business5 Welsh affairs 6 Death 7 Family7.1 Family tree8 Citations 9 ReferencesIdentity[edit] Richard's toponymic byname is given in modern accounts as de Belmeis. Occasionally the form de Beaumais
Beaumais
is encountered
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Justiciar
In Medieval
Medieval
England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
the Chief Justiciar (later known simply as the Justiciar) was roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister[1] as the monarch's chief minister. Similar positions existed in Continental Europe, particularly in Norman Italy and in the Carolingian empire. The term is the English form of the medieval Latin justiciarius or justitiarius ("man of justice", i.e. judge). A similar office was formed in Scotland, though there were usually two or three: the Justiciar of Scotia, the Justiciar of Lothian and, in the 13th century, the Justiciar of Galloway. These offices later evolved into a national one called Lord Justice-General. The Justiciar of Ireland was an office established during English rule
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Cilgerran Castle
Cilgerran
Cilgerran
Castle
Castle
(Welsh: Castell Cilgerran) is a 13th-century ruined castle located in Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire, Wales, near Cardigan. The first castle on the site was thought to be built by Gerald of Windsor around 1110–1115, and it changed hands several times over the following century between English and Welsh forces. In the hands of William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, the construction of the stone castle began after 1223. After passing through successive families, it was left to ruin and eventually abandoned by 1400. The castle backs onto a cliff face, with the remaining ruins dating from the 13th century. It was most heavily fortified where it faces inland, and includes a pair of drum towers rather than a central keep which remain
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Gerald De Windsor
Gerald de Windsor
Gerald de Windsor
(c. 1075–1135), alias Gerald FitzWalter, was the first castellan of Pembroke Castle
Pembroke Castle
in Pembrokeshire
Pembrokeshire
(formerly part of the Kingdom of Deheubarth), in Wales, and was in charge of the Norman forces in southwest Wales
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Nest Ferch Rhys
Nest ferch Rhys
Nest ferch Rhys
(c. 1085 – before 1136) (popularly called Nesta or "Princess Nesta"[1][2]) was the only legitimate daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last king of Deheubarth
Deheubarth
in Wales, by his wife, Gwladys ferch Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn of Powys. Her family is of the House of Dinefwr. Nest was the wife of Gerald de Windsor
Gerald de Windsor
(c
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Owain Ap Cadwgan
Owain ap Cadwgan (died 1116) was a prince of Powys in eastern Wales. He is best known for his abduction of Nest, wife of Gerald of Windsor. Owain was the eldest son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn, prince of part of Powys. He is first recorded in 1106, when he killed Meurig and Griffri, the sons of Trahaearn ap Caradog, who held lands in Arwystli. In 1109 Owain's father Cadwgan gave a great feast at his court in Ceredigion, and at this feast Owain was told of the beauty of his second cousin Nest, whose husband Gerald held the castle of Cenarth Bychan (possibly Cilgerran Castle). He decided to visit Cenarth Bychan to see for himself, and having done so fell in love with Nest and determined to have her. It was also enticing that Nest was the daughter of the last King of Deheubarth. One night at Christmas 1109 Owain and fifteen companions burrowed underneath the gate to get into the castle then rushed in to abuct Nest and her children and set fire to the castle
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