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Cable TV
Cable television
Cable television
is a system of delivering television programming to paying subscribers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or in more recent systems, light pulses through fiber-optic cables. This contrasts with broadcast television, in which the television signal is transmitted over the air by radio waves and received by a television antenna attached to the television; or satellite television, in which the television signal is bounced off of the Earth's firmament and received by a satellite dish on the roof. FM radio
FM radio
programming, high-speed Internet, telephone services, and similar non-television services may also be provided through these cables
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Narrowcasting
Narrowcasting has traditionally been understood as the dissemination of information (usually via Internet, radio, newspaper, or television) to a narrow audience; not to the broader public at-large. Also called niche marketing or target marketing, narrowcasting involves aiming media messages at specific segments of the public defined by values, preferences, demographic attributes, and/or subscription. Narrowcasting is based on the postmodern idea that mass audiences do not exist.[1] While the first uses of the term appeared within the context of subscription radio programs in the late 1940s,[2] the term first entered the common lexicon due to computer scientist and public broadcasting advocate J. C. R. Licklider, who in a 1967 report envisioned"a multiplicity of television networks aimed at serving the needs of smaller, specialized audiences
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Z Channel
The Z Channel
Z Channel
was one of the first pay television stations in the United States. Launched in 1974 from Los Angeles, California, this station was known for its devotion to the art of cinema due to the eclectic choice of films[1] by the programming chief, Jerry Harvey. It also popularized the use of letterboxing on television, as well as showing 'director's cut' versions of films (which is a term popularized after Z Channel's showing of Heaven's Gate). Z Channel's devotion to cinema and choice of rare and important films had an important influence on such directors as Robert Altman, Quentin Tarantino, and Jim Jarmusch.Contents1 History 2 Live wrestling events 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Z Channel
Z Channel
was launched in 1974 by Theta Cable (a division of TelePrompTer Corporation and Hughes Aircraft Co.) which was acquired by Group W (Westinghouse) in 1981
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E!
E! (originally an initialism of Entertainment Television) is an American basic cable and satellite television channel that is owned by the NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment Group division of NBCUniversal, all owned by Comcast. As of January 2016, E! is available to 92.4 million households in America.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Movietime 1.2 E!2 Programming2.1 News 2.2 Original series 2.3 Acquired series and films3 E! HD 4 E! Online 5 International versions5.1 Australia 5.2 Canada 5.3 Europe5.3.1 France 5.3.2 Germany5.4 Asia5.4.1 Israel 5.4.2 Philippines 5.4.3 South Korea6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Movietime[edit] E! was originally launched on July 31, 1987, as Movietime, a service that aired movie trailers, entertainment news, eve
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Set-top Box
A set-top box (STB) or set-top unit (STU) (one type also colloquially known as a cable box) is an information appliance device that generally contains a TV-tuner input and displays output to a television set and an external source of signal, turning the source signal into content in a form that then be displayed on the television screen or other display device
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Linjesender
A linjesender (English: "line transmitter") was a low power longwave transmitter system used for broadcasting in Norway. It consisted of a power line communication system, which fed the radio programme on a frequency in the longwave broadcasting range into domestic powerlines. The last linjesender in Norway
Norway
was closed in 1987 although the Swiss counterpart survived another ten years.Contents1 Features 2 Similar systems 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksFeatures[edit] The typical powers used by linjesenders were between 250 watts and 2 kW
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Hobbyist
A hobby is a regular activity that is done for enjoyment, typically during one's leisure time. Hobbies can include collecting themed items and objects, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, playing sports, or pursuing other amusements. A list of hobbies is lengthy and always changing as interests and fashions change. By continually participating in a particular hobby, one can acquire substantial skills and knowledge in that area. Engagement in hobbies has increased since the late nineteenth century as workers have more leisure time and advancing production and technology have provided more support for leisure activities
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Alfred, New York
Tom Mansfield (R)Town CouncilJerry Snyder (R) Donald Lang (R) Fion MacCrea () Mary Stearns (R)Area[1] • Total 31.63 sq mi (81.91 km2) • Land 31.48 sq mi (81.52 km2) • Water 0.15 sq mi (0.39 km2)Elevation 1,916 ft (584 m)Population (2010) • Total 5,237 • Estimate (2016)[2] 5,084 • Density 161.52/sq mi (62.36/km2)Time zone EST (UTC-5) • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)ZIP code 14803Area code(s) 607FIPS code 36-003-01209Website townofalfred.comAlfred is a town in Allegany County, New York, United States
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Blanking Interval
Horizontal blanking interval refers to a part of the process of displaying images on a computer monitor or television screen via raster scanning. CRT screens display images by moving beams of electrons very quickly across the screen. Once the beam of the monitor has reached the edge of the screen, the beam is switched off, and the deflection circuit voltages (or currents) are returned to the values they had for the other edge of the screen; this would have the effect of retracing the screen in the opposite direction, so the beam is turned off during this time. This part of the line display process is the Horizontal Blank.[1][2] In detail, the Horizontal blanking interval consists of:front porch – blank while still moving right, past the end of the scanline, sync pulse – blank while rapidly moving left; in terms of amplitude, "blacker than black". back porch – blank while moving right again, before the start of the next scanline
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Popular Science
Popular science
Popular science
(also called pop-science or popsci) is an interpretation of science intended for a general audience. While science journalism focuses on recent scientific developments, popular science is more broad-ranging. It may be written by professional science journalists or by scientists themselves. It is presented in many forms, including books, film and television documentaries, magazine articles, and web pages.Contents1 Role 2 Common threads 3 Notable English-language popularizers of science 4 Some sources of popular science 5 Science
Science
media5.1 Science
Science
in the headlines 5.2 News online 5.3 Press6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 BibliographyRole[edit] Popular science
Popular science
is a bridge between scientific literature as a professional medium of scientific research, and the realms of popular political and cultural discourse
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AT&T U-verse
AT&T U-verse, commonly called U-verse, was an AT&T brand of triple-play telecommunications services, although the brand is now only used in reference to the IPTV
IPTV
service
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Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
is an American magazine published by John August Media, LLC, and hosted at TechnicaCuriosa.com. The magazine was started by Ziff-Davis
Ziff-Davis
Publishing Company in October 1954 for electronics hobbyists and experimenters. It soon became the "World's Largest-Selling Electronics Magazine". In April 1957 Ziff-Davis reported an average net paid circulation of 240,151 copies.[1] Popular Electronics was published until October 1982 when, in November 1982, Ziff-Davis
Ziff-Davis
launched a successor magazine, Computers & Electronics. During its last year of publication by Ziff-Davis, Popular Electronics reported an average monthly circulation of 409,344 copies.[2] The title was sold to Gernsback Publications, and their Hands-On Electronics magazine was renamed to Popular Electronics
Popular Electronics
in February 1989, and published until December 1999
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Multichannel Television Sound
Multichannel television sound, better known as MTS (often still as BTSC, for the Broadcast Television
Television
Systems Committee that created it), is the method of encoding three additional channels of audio into an analog NTSC-format audio carrier.Contents1 History 2 Adopted in 3 How MTS works 4 MTS real world performance 5 MTS licensing 6 How MTS audio channels are used 7 MTS and the DTV transition in the United States 8 See also 9 ReferencesHistory[edit] Multichannel Television
Television
Sound
Sound
was adopted by the Federal Communications Commission as the U.S. standard for stereo television transmission in 1984. Initial work on design and testing of a stereophonic audio system began in 1975 when Telesonics approached Chicago
Chicago
public television station WTTW
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Cornwall, Ontario
Cornwall
Cornwall
is a city in Eastern Ontario, Canada, and the seat of the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry
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Media Market
A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area (DMA), television market area, or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet
Internet
content. They can coincide or overlap with one or more metropolitan areas, though rural regions with few significant population centers can also be designated as markets. Conversely, very large metropolitan areas can sometimes be subdivided into multiple segments. Market regions may overlap, meaning that people residing on the edge of one media market may be able to receive content from other nearby markets. They are widely used in audience measurements, which are compiled in the United States
United States
by Nielsen Media Research
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Television Film
A television film (also known as a TV movie, TV film, television movie, telefilm, telemovie, made-for-television movie, made-for-television film, direct-to-TV movie, direct-to-TV film, movie of the week, feature-length drama, single drama and original movie) is a feature-length motion picture that is produced for, and originally distributed by or to, a television network, in contrast to theatrical films, which are made explicitly for initial showing in movie theaters.Contents1 Origins and history 2 Examples 3 Production and quality 4 Movie-length episodes of television shows 5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyOrigins and history[edit] Though not exactly labeled as such, there were early precedents for "television movies", such as Talk
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