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Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
(German: Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari) is a 1920 German silent horror film, directed by Robert Wiene
Robert Wiene
and written by Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer. Considered the quintessential work of German Expressionist cinema, it tells the story of an insane hypnotist (Werner Krauss) who uses a somnambulist (Conrad Veidt) to commit murders. The film features a dark and twisted visual style, with sharp-pointed forms, oblique and curving lines, structures and landscapes that lean and twist in unusual angles, and shadows and streaks of light painted directly onto the sets. The script was inspired by various experiences from the lives of Janowitz and Mayer, both pacifists who were left distrustful of authority after their experiences with the military during World War I
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Fritz Lang
Friedrich Christian Anton "Fritz" Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American filmmaker, screenwriter, and occasional film producer and actor.[2] One of the best-known émigrés from Germany's school of Expressionism, he was dubbed the "Master of Darkness" by the British Film Institute.[3] His most famous films include the groundbreaking futuristic Metropolis (1927) and the also influential M (1931), a film noir precursor that he made before he moved to the United States.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Early life 1.2 Expressionist films: the Weimar years (1918–1933) 1.3 Emigration 1.4 Hollywood
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Plot Twist
A plot twist is a literary technique, introducing a radical change in the direction or expected outcome of the plot in a work of fiction.[1] When it happens near the end of a story, it is known as a twist or surprise ending.[2] It may change the audience's perception of the preceding events, or introduce a new conflict that places it in a different context. A plot twist may be foreshadowed, to prepare the audience to accept it. There are a variety of methods used to execute a plot twist, such as withholding information from the audience or misleading them with ambiguous or false information. Revealing a plot twist to readers or viewers in advance is commonly regarded as a "spoiler", since the effectiveness of a plot twist usually relies on the audience not expecting it
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Roger Ebert
Roger Joseph Ebert (/ˈiːbərt/; June 18, 1942 – April 4, 2013) was an American film critic, historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Criticism. Ebert and Chicago
Chicago
Tribune critic Gene Siskel
Gene Siskel
helped popularize nationally televised film reviewing when they co-hosted the PBS
PBS
show Sneak Previews, followed by several variously named At the Movies programs. The two verbally sparred and traded humorous barbs while discussing films. They created and trademarked the phrase "Two Thumbs Up," used when both hosts gave the same film a positive review
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Danny Peary
Danny Peary (born 1949) is an American film critic and sports writer. He has written and edited many books on cinema and sports-related topics.Contents1 Biography 2 Media appearances 3 Bibliography3.1 Books 3.2 Essays and reporting 3.3 Film
Film
reviews4 External linksBiography[edit] Peary was born in West Virginia
West Virginia
and grew up in South Carolina
South Carolina
and New Jersey. He earned a B.A. in History from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and an M.A. in Cinema at University of Southern California. He is the brother of film critic, columnist, actor, and documentary filmmaker Gerald Peary. He has lived in New York City
New York City
since 1977. Peary and Karyn Kay ran the Pinocchio Film
Film
Society at UW. While at USC, he worked as the fine arts and sports editor for L.A
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Cult Film
A cult film or cult movie, also commonly referred to as a cult classic, is a film that has acquired a cult following. Cult films are known for their dedicated, passionate fanbase, an elaborate subculture that engage in repeated viewings, quoting dialogue, and audience participation. Inclusive definitions allow for major studio productions, especially box office bombs, while exclusive definitions focus more on obscure, transgressive films shunned by the mainstream. The difficulty in defining the term and subjectivity of what qualifies as a cult film mirror classificatory disputes about art. The term cult film itself was first used in the 1970s to describe the culture that surrounded underground films and midnight movies, though cult was in common use in film analysis for decades prior to that. Cult films trace their origin back to controversial and suppressed films kept alive by dedicated fans
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Art Film
An art film is typically a serious, independent film, aimed at a niche market, rather than a mass market audience.[1] An art film is "intended to be a serious, artistic work, often experimental and not designed for mass appeal,"[2] "made primarily for aesthetic reasons rather than commercial profit,"[3] and contains "unconventional or highly symbolic content."[4] Film critics and film studies scholars typically define an art film as possessing "formal qualities that mark them as different from mainstream Hollywood films."[5] These qualities can include (among other elements): a sense of social realism; an emphasis on the authorial expressiveness of the director; and a focus on the thoughts, dreams or motivations of characters, as opposed to the unfolding of a clear, goal-driven story
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Film Noir
Film
Film
noir (/fɪlm nwɑːr/; French pronunciation: ​[film nwaʁ]) is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood
Hollywood
crime dramas, particularly such that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. Hollywood's classical film noir period is generally regarded as extending from the early 1940s to the late 1950s. Film
Film
noir of this era is associated with a low-key, black-and-white visual style that has roots in German Expressionist cinematography
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Twist Ending
A plot twist is a literary technique, introducing a radical change in the direction or expected outcome of the plot in a work of fiction.[1] When it happens near the end of a story, it is known as a twist or surprise ending.[2] It may change the audience's perception of the preceding events, or introduce a new conflict that places it in a different context. A plot twist may be foreshadowed, to prepare the audience to accept it. There are a variety of methods used to execute a plot twist, such as withholding information from the audience or misleading them with ambiguous or false information. Revealing a plot twist to readers or viewers in advance is commonly regarded as a "spoiler", since the effectiveness of a plot twist usually relies on the audience not expecting it
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Flashback (narrative)
A flashback is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point in the story.[1] Flashbacks are often used to recount events that happened before the story's primary sequence of events to fill in crucial backstory.[2] In the opposite direction, a flashforward (or prolepsis) reveals events that will occur in the future.[3] Both flashback and flashforward are used to cohere a story, develop a character, or add structure to the narrative
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Straitjacket
A straitjacket is a garment shaped like a jacket with long sleeves that surpass the tips of the wearer's fingers. Its most typical usage is restraining people who may cause harm to themselves or others. Once the wearer slides his or her arms into the sleeves, the person assisting the wearer crosses the sleeves against the chest and ties the ends of the sleeves to the back of the jacket, ensuring the arms are close to the chest with as little movement as possible. Although straitjacket is the most common spelling, strait-jacket is also frequent. Straitjackets are called camisoles.[1][2][3] The effect of a straitjacket as a restraint makes it of special interest in escapology. The straitjacket is also a staple prop in stage magic. The straitjacket as an instrument of torture comes from the Victorian era of medicine
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Ernst Deutsch
Ernst Deutsch, also known as Ernest Dorian (16 September 1890, Prague – 22 March 1969, Berlin), was an Austrian actor. In 1916, his performance as the protagonist in the world première of Walter Hasenclever's Expressionist play The Son in Dresden
Dresden
was praised.[1] Deutsch also played the antihero Famulus in Paul Wegener's The Golem: How He Came into the World in 1920. He is known by English-speaking audiences for his role as Baron Kurtz in Carol Reed's 1949 film noir, The Third Man.Contents1 Family 2 Life and career 3 Filmography 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksFamily[edit] Deutsch was the son of Prague-based German merchant Ludwig Kraus and his wife, Louise
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Siegfried Kracauer
Siegfried Kracauer
Siegfried Kracauer
(February 8, 1889 – November 26, 1966) was a German writer, journalist, sociologist, cultural critic, and film theorist. He has sometimes been associated with the Frankfurt School of critical theory.Contents1 Biography 2 Theories on memory 3 Reception 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingBiography[edit] Born to a Jewish family in Frankfurt am Main, Kracauer studied architecture from 1907 to 1913, eventually obtaining a doctorate in engineering in 1914 and working as an architect in Osnabrück, Munich, and Berlin
Berlin
until 1920. Near the end of the First World War, he befriended the young Theodor W. Adorno, to whom he became an early philosophical mentor
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Paul Wegener
Paul Wegener
Paul Wegener
(11 December 1874 – 13 September 1948) was a German actor, writer and film director known for his pioneering role in German expressionist cinema.Contents1 Stage and early film career 2 Later film career 3 Life under the Nazi regime 4 Personal life 5 Late career and death 6 Selected filmography6.1 Actor 6.2 Director7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksStage and early film career[edit] At the age of 20, Wegener decided to end his law studies and concentrate on acting, touring the provinces before joining Max Reinhardt's acting troupe in 1906. In 1912, he turned to the new medium of motion pictures and appeared in the 1913 version of The Student of Prague. It was while making this film that he first heard the old Jewish
Jewish
legend of the Golem
Golem
and proceeded to adapt the story to film, co-directing and co-writing the script with Henrik Galeen
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Prague
Motto(s): " Praga
Praga
Caput Rei publicae" (Latin)[1] "Prague, Head of the Republic"other historical mottos  " Praga
Praga
mater urbium" (Latin) "Praha matka měst" (Czech)[1] "Prague, Mother of Cities" "
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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