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CYP1A2
2HI4IdentifiersAliases CYP1A2, CP12, P3-450, P450(PA), cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily A member 2, Cytochrome P450
Cytochrome P450
1A2, CYPIA2External IDs OMIM: 124060 MGI: 88589 HomoloGene: 68082 GeneCards: CYP1A2 Gene
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Protein Data Bank
The Protein
Protein
Data Bank (PDB) is a crystallographic database for the three-dimensional structural data of large biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids. The data, typically obtained by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, or, increasingly, cryo-electron microscopy, and submitted by biologists and biochemists from around the world, are freely accessible on the Internet via the websites of its member organisations (PDBe,[1] PDBj,[2] and RCSB[3]). The PDB is overseen by an organization called the Worldwide Protein
Protein
Data Bank, wwPDB. The PDB is a key resource in areas of structural biology, such as structural genomics. Most major scientific journals, and some funding agencies, now require scientists to submit their structure data to the PDB
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Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase
1S8O, 1VJ5, 1ZD2, 1ZD3, 1ZD4, 1ZD5, 3ANS, 3ANT, 3I1Y, 3I28, 3KOO, 3OTQ, 3PDC, 3WK4, 3WK5, 3WK6, 3WK7, 3WK8, 3WK9, 3WKA, 3WKB, 3WKC, 3WKD, 3WKE, 4C4X, 4C4Y, 4C4Z, 4HAI, 4J03, 4JNC, 4OCZ, 4OD0, 4X6X, 4X6Y, 4Y2J, 4Y2P, 4Y2Q, 4Y2R, 4Y2S, 4Y2T, 4Y2U, 4Y2V, 4Y2X, 4Y2Y, 5AHX, 5AI0, 5AI4, 5AI5, 5AI6, 5AI8, 5AI9, 5AIA, 5AIB, 5AIC, 5AK3, 5AK4, 5AK5, 5AK6, 5AKE, 5AKG, 5AKH, 5AKI, 5AKJ, 5AKK, 5AKL, 5AKX, 5AKY, 5AKZ, 5ALD, 5ALE, 5ALF, 5ALG, 5ALH, 5ALI, 5ALJ, 5ALK, 5ALL, 5ALM, 5ALN, 5ALO, 5ALP, 5ALQ, 5ALR, 5ALS, 5ALT, 5ALU, 5ALV, 5ALW, 5ALX, 5ALY, 5ALZ, 5AM0, 5AM1, 5AM2, 5AM3, 5AM4, 5AM5, 5FP0IdentifiersAliases EPHX2, CEH, SEH, Epoxide hydrolase
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20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid
20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, also known as 20-HETE or 20-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid, is an eicosanoid metabolite of arachidonic acid that has a wide range of effects on the vascular system including the regulation of vascular tone, blood flow to specific organs, sodium and fluid transport in the kidney, and vascular pathway remodeling. These vascular and kidney effects of 20-HETE have been shown to be responsible for regulating blood pressure and blood flow to specific organs in rodents; genetic and preclinical studies suggest that 20-HETE may similarly regulate blood pressure and contribute to the development of stroke and heart attacks. Additionally the loss of its production appears to be one cause of the human neurological disease, Hereditary spastic paraplegia
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Docosahexaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic acid
Docosahexaenoic acid
(DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is a primary structural component of the human brain, cerebral cortex, skin, and retina
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Epoxide
An epoxide is a cyclic ether with a three-atom ring. This ring approximates an equilateral triangle, which makes it strained, and hence highly reactive, more so than other ethers. They are produced on a large scale for many applications. In general, low molecular weight epoxides are colourless and nonpolar, and often volatile.[1]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Synthesis2.1 Heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation of alkenes 2.2 Olefin oxidation using organic peroxides and metal catalysts 2.3 Olefin peroxidation using peroxycarboxylic acids 2.4 Homogeneously catalysed asymmetric epoxidations 2.5 Intramolecular SN2 substitution 2.6 Nucleophilic epoxidation 2.7 Biosynthesis3 Reactions3.1 Niche reactions4 Uses 5 Safety 6 See also 7 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] A compound containing the epoxide functional group can be called an epoxy, epoxide, oxirane, and ethoxyline. Simple epoxides are often referred to as oxides. Thus, the epoxide of ethylene (C2H4) is ethylene oxide (C2H4O)
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Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Eicosapentaenoic acid
Eicosapentaenoic acid
(EPA; also icosapentaenoic acid) is an omega-3 fatty acid. In physiological literature, it is given the name 20:5(n-3). It also has the trivial name timnodonic acid. In chemical structure, EPA is a carboxylic acid with a 20-carbon chain and five cis double bonds; the first double bond is located at the third carbon from the omega end. EPA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that acts as a precursor for prostaglandin-3 (which inhibits platelet aggregation), thromboxane-3, and leukotriene-5 eicosanoids. Studies of fish oil supplements, which contain EPA, have failed to support claims of preventing heart attacks or strokes.[1][2][3]Contents1 Sources 2 Clinical significance 3 References 4 External linksSources[edit] EPA is obtained in the human diet by eating oily fish or fish oil, e.g. cod liver, herring, mackerel, salmon, menhaden and sardine, and various types of edible seaweed and phytoplankton
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Arteriole
An arteriole is a small-diameter blood vessel in the microcirculation that extends and branches out from an artery and leads to capillaries.[1] Arterioles have muscular walls (usually only one to two layers of smooth muscle) and are the primary site of vascular resistance. The greatest change in blood pressure and velocity of blood flow occurs at the transition of arterioles to capillaries.Contents1 Structure1.1 Microanatomy2 Physiology2.1 Blood pressure 2.2 Stretch3 Clinical significance3.1 Disease3.1.1 Arteriosclerosis 3.1.2 Arteritis3.2 Medication4 Metarterioles 5 See also 6 ReferencesStructure[edit] Microanatomy[edit] In a healthy vascular system the endothelium lines all blood-contacting surfaces, including arterioles, arteries, veins, capillaries, and heart chambers
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Inflammation
Inflammation
Inflammation
(from Latin
Latin
inflammatio) is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants,[1] and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators
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Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
is the physiological process through which new blood vessels form from pre-existing vessels.[1][2][3] In precise usage this is distinct from vasculogenesis, which is the de novo formation of endothelial cells from mesoderm cell precursors,[4] and from neovascularization, although discussions are not always precise (especially in older texts). The first vessels in the developing embryo form through vasculogenesis, after which angiogenesis is responsible for most, if not all, blood vessel growth during development and in disease.[5] Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
is a normal and vital process in growth and development, as well as in wound healing and in the formation of granulation tissue. However, it is also a fundamental step in the transition of tumors from a benign state to a malignant one, leading to the use of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of cancer
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Omega-3 Fatty Acid
Omega−3 fatty acids, also called ω−3 fatty acids or n−3 fatty acids,[1] are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).[2][3] The fatty acids have two ends, the carboxylic acid (-COOH) end, which is considered the beginning of the chain, thus "alpha", and the methyl (-CH3) end, which is considered the "tail" of the chain, thus "omega". One way in which a fatty acid is named is determined by the location of the first double bond, counted from the tail, that is, the omega (ω-) or the n- end
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Epoxide Hydrolase
Epoxide
Epoxide
hydrolases (EH's), also known as epoxide hydratases, are enzymes that metabolize compounds that contain an epoxide residue; they convert this residue to two hydroxyl residues through a dihydroxylation reaction to form diol products. Several enzymes possess EH activity. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (epoxide hydrolase 1, EH1, or mEH), soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, epoxide hydrolase 2, EH2, or cytoplasmic epoxide hydrolase), and the more recently discovered but not as yet well defined functionally, epoxide hydrolase 3 (EH3) and epoxide hydrolase 4 (EH4) are structurally closely related isozymes
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Cumin
Cumin
Cumin
(/ˈkjuːmɪn/ or UK: /ˈkʌmɪn/, US: /ˈkuːmɪn/) (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to a territory including Middle East
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Gene Nomenclature
Gene
Gene
nomenclature is the scientific naming of genes, the units of heredity in living organisms
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Turmeric
Curcurma domestica Valeton Turmeric
Turmeric
( Curcuma
Curcuma
longa) (/ˈtɜːrmərɪk/)[2] is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae.[3] It is native to the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
and Southeast Asia, and requires temperatures between 20 and 30 °C (68–86 °F) and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive. Plants are gathered annually for their rhizomes and propagated from some of those rhizomes in the following season. When not used fresh, the rhizomes are boiled in water for about 30–45 minutes and then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep-orange-yellow powder[4] commonly used as a coloring and flavoring agent in many Asian cuisines, especially for curries, as well as for dyeing
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Enzyme Substrate
In chemistry, a substrate is typically the chemical species being observed in a chemical reaction, which is organic in nature and reacts with a reagent to generate a product. In synthetic and organic chemistry, the substrate is the chemical of interest that is being modified. In biochemistry, an enzyme substrate is the material upon which an enzyme acts. When referring to Le Chatelier's principle, the substrate is the reagent whose concentration is changed
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