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Cyclades
The Cyclades
Cyclades
(/ˈsɪklədiːz/; Greek: Κυκλάδες [cikˈlaðes]) are an island group in the Aegean Sea, southeast of mainland Greece and a former administrative prefecture of Greece. They are one of the island groups which constitute the Aegean archipelago. The name refers to the islands around (κυκλάς) the sacred island of Delos
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Emmer
Emmer
Emmer
wheat, also known as farro especially in Italy, or hulled wheat,[2] is a type of awned wheat. Emmer
Emmer
is a tetraploid (2n=4x=28 chromosomes).[4] The domesticated species are Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccum and Triticum turgidum conv. durum. The wild species is called Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccoides. The principal difference between the wild and the domestic species is that the ripened seed head of the wild species shatters and spreads the seed onto the ground, while in the domesticated emmer, the seed head remains intact, thus making it easier for humans to harvest the grain.[5] Along with einkorn wheat, emmer was one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Pollution
Pollution
Pollution
is the introduction of contaminants into the natural environment that cause adverse change.[1] Pollution
Pollution
can take the form of chemical substances or energy, such as noise, heat or light. Pollutants, the components of pollution, can be either foreign substances/energies or naturally occurring contaminants. Pollution
Pollution
is often classed as point source or nonpoint source pollution
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Erosion
In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that removes soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, and then transport it away to another location[1] (not to be confused with weathering which involves no movement). This natural process is caused by the dynamic activity of erosive agents, that is, water, ice (glaciers), snow, air (wind), plants, animals, and humans. In accordance with these agents, erosion is sometimes divided into water erosion, glacial erosion, snow erosion, wind (aeolic) erosion, zoogenic erosion, and anthropogenic erosion[2].The particulate breakdown of rock or soil into clastic sediment is referred to as physical or mechanical erosion; this contrasts with chemical erosion, where soil or rock material is removed from an area by its dissolving into a solvent (typically water), followed by the flow away of that solution
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Tourism
Tourism
Tourism
is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours.[1] Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country. The World Tourism
Tourism
Organization defines tourism more generally, in terms which go "beyond the common perception of tourism as being limited to holiday activity only", as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".[2] Tourism
Tourism
can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country's balance of payments
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Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Constantin Brâncuși
Constantin Brâncuși
Constantin Brâncuși
(Romanian: [konstanˈtin brɨŋˈkuʃʲ] ( listen); February 19, 1876 – March 16, 1957) was a Romanian sculptor, painter and photographer who made his career in France. Considered a pioneer of modernism, one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th-century, Brâncuși is called the patriarch of modern sculpture. As a child he displayed an aptitude for carving wooden farm tools. Formal studies took him first to Bucharest, then to Munich, then to the École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
in Paris from 1905 to 1907. His art emphasizes clean geometrical lines that balance forms inherent in his materials with the symbolic allusions of representational art. Brâncuși sought inspiration in non-European cultures as a source of primitive exoticism, as did Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso, André Derain
André Derain
and others
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Jean Arp
Jean Arp
Jean Arp
or Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French sculptor, painter, poet, and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper. When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as "Hans", and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as "Jean".Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Exhibitions 4 Recognition 5 Personal life and death 6 Legacy 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Arp was born in Strasbourg, the son of a French mother and a German father, during the period following the Franco-Prussian War
Franco-Prussian War
when the area was known as Alsace-Lorraine
Alsace-Lorraine
(Elsass-Lothringen in German) after France
France
had ceded it to Germany
Germany
in 1871
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Cyclodes (moth)
Cyclodes is a genus of moths of the Noctuidae family. Description[edit] Palpi smoothly scaled, where the second joint reaching vertex of head and minute third joint. Antennae simple. Thorax hairy. Abdomen with strong ridges of coarse hair. Tibia slightly hairy and spineless. Forewings with nearly rectangular apex. Outer margin obliquely rounded. Hindwings with vein 5 arise from above the angle of cell.[1] Species[edit]Cyclodes omma Hoeven, 1840 Cyclodes spectans Snellen, 1886References[edit]^ Hampson G. F. (1892). "The Fauna of British India Including Ceylon and Burma Moths Vol-ii". Digital Library of India. p. 558. Retrieved 4 July 2016. [permanent dead link]Cyclodes at Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms Natural History Museum Lepidoptera genus databaseTaxon identifiersWd: Q5198695 ButMoth: 7680.0 EoL: 68777 GBIF: 1767796 LepIndex: 283601.0 NCBI: 706027This Calpinae article is a stub
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Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Archipelago
An archipelago (/ɑːrkɪˈpɛləɡoʊ/ ( listen) ark-i-PEL-ə-goh), sometimes called an island group or island chain, is a chain, cluster or collection of islands, or sometimes a sea containing a small number of scattered islands. The word archipelago is derived from the Greek ἄρχι- – arkhi- ("chief") and πέλαγος – pélagos ("sea") through the Italian arcipelago. In Italian, possibly following a tradition of antiquity, the Archipelago
Archipelago
(from medieval Greek *ἀρχιπέλαγος and Latin archipelagus) was the proper name for the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
and, later, usage shifted to refer to the Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
(since the sea is remarkable for its large number of islands).Contents1 Types 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes[edit] Archipelagos may be found isolated in large amounts of water or neighbouring a large land mass
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Island Group
An archipelago (/ɑːrkɪˈpɛləɡoʊ/ ( listen) ark-i-PEL-ə-goh), sometimes called an island group or island chain, is a chain, cluster or collection of islands, or sometimes a sea containing a small number of scattered islands. The word archipelago is derived from the Greek ἄρχι- – arkhi- ("chief") and πέλαγος – pélagos ("sea") through the Italian arcipelago. In Italian, possibly following a tradition of antiquity, the Archipelago (from medieval Greek *ἀρχιπέλαγος and Latin archipelagus) was the proper name for the Aegean Sea and, later, usage shifted to refer to the Aegean Islands (since the sea is remarkable for its large number of islands).Contents1 Types 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes[edit] Archipelagos may be found isolated in large amounts of water or neighbouring a large land mass
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Breeches
Breeches
Breeches
(/ˈbriːtʃɪz, ˈbrɪ-/ BREE-chiz, BRITCH-iz)[1][2] are an article of clothing covering the body from the waist down, with separate coverings for each leg, usually stopping just below the knee, though in some cases reaching to the ankles. The breeches were normally closed and fastened about the leg, along its open seams at varied lengths, and to the knee, by either buttons or by a drawstring, or by one or more straps and buckle or brooches. Formerly a standard item of Western men's clothing, they had fallen out of use by the mid- 19th century
19th century
in favour of trousers
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ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions.Contents1 Parts 2 Editions 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency3.1 Members4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParts[edit] It consists of three parts:[1]ISO 3166-1, Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
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