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CVN-80
USS Enterprise (CVN-80)
USS Enterprise (CVN-80)
will be the third Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier to be built for the United States Navy.[2][3] She will be the ninth United States naval vessel to bear the name, and is scheduled to be constructed and in operation by 2027.Contents1 Naming 2 Construction 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksNaming[edit] On 1 December 2012, during the presentation of a pre-recorded speech at the inactivation ceremony for USS Enterprise (CVN-65), then U.S
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Newport News, Virginia
Newport News is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 180,719.[4] In 2013, the population was estimated to be 183,412,[5] making it the fifth-most populous city in Virginia. Newport News is included in the Hampton Roads
Hampton Roads
metropolitan area. It is at the southeastern end of the Virginia
Virginia
Peninsula, on the northern shore of the James River
James River
extending southeast from Skiffe's Creek
Skiffe's Creek
along many miles of waterfront to the river's mouth at Newport News Point on the harbor of Hampton Roads. The area now known as Newport News was once a part of Warwick County
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Congressional Research Service
The Congressional Research Service
Congressional Research Service
(CRS), known as Congress's think tank,[3] is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress. As a legislative branch agency within the Library of Congress, CRS works primarily and directly for Members of Congress, their Committees and staff on a confidential, nonpartisan basis. Its staff of approximately 600 employees includes lawyers, economists, reference librarians, and social, natural, and physical scientists.[4] In fiscal year 2016, CRS was appropriated a budget of roughly $106.9 million by Congress.[1] CRS is joined by two major congressional support agencies. The Congressional Budget Office
Congressional Budget Office
provides Congress with budget-related information, reports on fiscal, budgetary, and programmatic issues, and analyses of budget policy options, costs, and effects
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USS America (CV-66)
USS America (CVA/CV-66) was one of three Kitty Hawk-class supercarriers built for the United States Navy
United States Navy
in the 1960s. Commissioned in 1965, she spent most of her career in the Atlantic and Mediterranean, but did make three Pacific deployments serving in the Vietnam War. She also served in the Persian Gulf
Persian Gulf
War's operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. America was the first large aircraft carrier since Operation Crossroads in 1946 to be expended in weapons tests. In 2005, she was scuttled southeast of Cape Hatteras, after four weeks of tests, despite a large protest of former crew-members who wanted to see her instituted as a memorial museum
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United States Secretary Of The Navy
The Secretary of the Navy (or SECNAV) is a statutory officer (10 U.S.C. § 5013) and the head (chief executive officer) of the Department of the Navy, a military department (component organization) within the Department of Defense of the United States
United States
of America. The Secretary of the Navy must be a civilian by law, at least 5 years removed from active military service. The Secretary is appointed by the President and requires confirmation by a majority vote of the Senate. The Secretary of the Navy was, from its creation in 1798, a member of the President's Cabinet until 1949, when the Secretary of the Navy (and the Secretaries of the Army and Air Force) was by amendments to the National Security Act of 1947
National Security Act of 1947
made subordinate to the Secretary of Defense.[1]Contents1 Responsibilities1.1 Navy Regulations 1.2 U.S
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Close-in Weapons System
A close-in weapon system (CIWS), often pronounced as SEE-wiz,[1] is a point-defense weapon system for detecting and destroying short-range incoming missiles and enemy aircraft which have penetrated the outer defenses, typically mounted shipboard in a naval capacity. Nearly all classes of modern warships are equipped with some kind of CIWS device. There are two types of CIWS systems. A gun-based CIWS usually consists of a combination of radars, computers, and multiple-barrel, rotary rapid-fire cannons placed on a rotating gun mount. Missile
Missile
systems use infra-red, passive radar/ESM or semi-active radar terminal guidance to guide missiles to the targeted enemy aircraft or other threats. In some cases, CIWS are used on land to protect military bases
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Surface-to-air Missile
A surface-to-air missile (SAM), or ground-to-air missile (GTAM), is a missile designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft or other missiles. It is one type of antiaircraft system; in modern armed forces, missiles have replaced most other forms of dedicated antiaircraft weapons, with anti-aircraft guns pushed into specialized roles. The first serious attempts at SAM development took place during World War II, although no operational systems were introduced. Further development in the 1940s and 1950s led to the first operational systems being introduced by most major forces during the second half of the 1950s
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Knot (unit)
The knot (/nɒt/) is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h (approximately 1.15078 mph).[1] The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn.[2] The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE); kt is also common
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Nuclear Reactor
A nuclear reactor, formerly known as an atomic pile, is a device used to initiate and control a sustained nuclear chain reaction. Nuclear reactors are used at nuclear power plants for electricity generation and in propulsion of ships. Heat from nuclear fission is passed to a working fluid (water or gas), which runs through steam turbines. These either drive a ship's propellers or turn electrical generators. Nuclear generated steam in principle can be used for industrial process heat or for district heating. Some reactors are used to produce isotopes for medical and industrial use, or for production of weapons-grade plutonium. Some are run only for research
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A1B Reactor
The A1B reactor plant is an aircraft carrier nuclear reactor developed by the United States Navy. It is used in Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers to provide electrical and propulsion energy.Contents1 History1.1 Development 1.2 Naming 1.3 Replacement2 Design2.1 Efficiency 2.2 Size and Interface3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Development[edit] The A1B reactor plant was developed for the new Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers to replace the ones used on their predecessors, the Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. The A1B nuclear reactor plant provides modernized technology that is both more advanced and adaptable than previous reactor technology. Naming[edit] The naming of reactors is based on the type, generation, and manufacturer. The type of reactor is for use in an aircraft carrier. Bechtel Corporation designed the new reactors
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Aircraft Carrier
An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft.[1] Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. Whilst heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets
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Nimitz-class Aircraft Carrier
The Nimitz-class supercarriers are a class of ten nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service with the United States Navy. The lead ship of the class is named after World War II
World War II
United States Pacific Fleet commander Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, who was the U.S. Navy's last surviving fleet admiral. With an overall length of 1,092 ft (333 m) and full-load displacement of over 100,000 long tons,[1] they have been the largest warships built and in service.[4] Instead of the gas turbines or diesel-electric systems used for propulsion on many modern warships, the carriers use two A4W pressurized water reactors which drive four propeller shafts and can produce a maximum speed of over 30 knots (56 km/h) and maximum power of around 260,000 shp (190 MW). As a result of the use of nuclear power, the ships are capable of operating for over 20 years without refueling and are predicted to have a service life of over 50 years
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Huntington Ingalls Industries
Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) is an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman.[3] Mike Petters is currently the president and CEO of Huntington Ingalls Industries (formerly president of the Newport News shipyard and president of the Northrop Grumman
Northrop Grumman
Shipbuilding).[4] HII is the sole designer, builder, and refueler of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in the United States. It is one of two nuclear-powered submarine builders (the other being General Dynamics Electric Boat). 70% of the current, active US Navy
US Navy
fleet has been built by HII's erstwhile units.Contents1 History 2 Divisions 3 Subsidiaries of Technical Solutions 4 Facilities4.1 Former facilities5 Projects5.1 Gerald R
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