HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

CPL (programming Language)
multi-paradigm: procedural, imperative, structured, functionalDesigned by Christopher Strachey
Christopher Strachey
et al.First appeared 1963; 55 years ago (1963)Influenced byALGOL 60InfluencedBCPL, POP-2CPL (Combined Programming Language) is a multi-paradigm programming language, that was developed in the early 1960s. It is an early ancestor of the C language
C language
via the BCPL and B languages.Contents1 Design 2 Example 3 Implementations 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyDesign[edit] CPL[1] was developed initially at the Mathematical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
as the "Cambridge Programming Language" and later published jointly between Cambridge and the University of London Computer Unit as the "Combined Programming Language"
[...More...]

"CPL (programming Language)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Programming Paradigm
Programming paradigms are a way to classify programming languages based on their features. Languages can be classified into multiple paradigms. Some paradigms are concerned mainly with implications for the execution model of the language, such as allowing side effects, or whether the sequence of operations is defined by the execution model. Other paradigms are concerned mainly with the way that code is organized, such as grouping a code into units along with the state that is modified by the code
[...More...]

"Programming Paradigm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
[...More...]

"University Of Cambridge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fundamental Concepts In Programming Languages
Fundamental Concepts in Programming Languages were an influential set of lecture notes written by Christopher Strachey for the International Summer School in Computer Programming at Copenhagen in August, 1967. It introduced much programming language terminology still in use today, including "R-value" and "L-value", "ad hoc polymorphism", "parametric polymorphism", and "referential transparency". The lecture notes were reprinted in 2000 in a special issue of Higher-Order and Symbolic Computation in memory of Strachey. Bibliography[edit]Mosses, Peter D. (2000). "A Foreword to 'Fundamental Concepts in Programming Languages'". Higher-Order and Symbolic Computation. 13: 7–9. doi:10.1023/A:1010048229036.  Strachey, Christopher (2000). "Fundamental Concepts in Programming Languages". Higher-Order and Symbolic Computation
[...More...]

"Fundamental Concepts In Programming Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peter Norvig
Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach Paradigms of AI Programming: Case Studies in Common LispWebsite www.norvig.comScientific careerFields Computer ScienceInstitutions Google Ames Research Center University of Southern California Brown University University of California, BerkeleyThesis A Unified Theory of Inference for Text Understanding (1986)Doctoral advisor Robert Wilensky[1]Signature Peter Norvig
Peter Norvig
(born December 14, 1956) is an American computer scientist
[...More...]

"Peter Norvig" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

C (programming Language)
C (/siː/, as in the letter c) is a general-purpose, imperative computer programming language, supporting structured programming, lexical variable scope and recursion, while a static type system prevents many unintended operations
[...More...]

"C (programming Language)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compiler
A compiler is computer software that transforms computer code written in one programming language (the source language) into another programming language (the target language). Compilers
Compilers
are a type of translator that support digital devices, primarily computers. The name compiler is primarily used for programs that translate source code from a high-level programming language to a lower level language (e.g., assembly language, object code, or machine code) to create an executable program.[1] However, there are many different types of compilers. If the compiled program can run on a computer whose CPU or operating system is different from the one on which the compiler runs, the compiler is a cross-compiler. A bootstrap compiler is written in the language that it intends to compile. A program that translates from a low-level language to a higher level one is a decompiler
[...More...]

"Compiler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Systems Programming
System programming (or systems programming) is the activity of programming computer system software. The primary distinguishing characteristic of systems programming when compared to application programming is that application programming aims to produce software which provides services to the user directly (e.g. word processor), whereas systems programming aims to produce software and software platforms which provide services to other software, are performance constrained, or both (e.g. operating systems, computational science applications, game engines and AAA video games, industrial automation, and software as a service applications).[1] System programming requires a great degree of hardware awareness
[...More...]

"Systems Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Atlas Computer (Manchester)
The Atlas Computer was a joint development between the University of Manchester, Ferranti, and Plessey. It was a second-generation machine, using discrete germanium transistors. The first Atlas, installed at Manchester University and officially commissioned in 1962, was one of the world's first supercomputers, considered to be the most powerful computer in the world at that time.[1] It was said that whenever Atlas went offline half of the United Kingdom's computer capacity was lost.[2] Two other Atlas machines were built: one for British Petroleum and the University of London, and one for the Atlas Computer Laboratory
Atlas Computer Laboratory
at Chilton near Oxford. A derivative system was built by Ferranti
Ferranti
for Cambridge University. Called the Titan, or Atlas 2, it had a different memory organisation and ran a time-sharing operating system developed by Cambridge University Computer Laboratory
[...More...]

"Atlas Computer (Manchester)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Titan (computer)
Titan was the prototype of the Atlas 2 computer developed by Ferranti and the University of Cambridge Mathematical Laboratory
University of Cambridge Mathematical Laboratory
in Cambridge, England
[...More...]

"Titan (computer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

David W. Barron
David William Barron FBCS (9 January 1935 – 2 January 2012) was a British academic in Physics and Computer Science who was described in the Times Higher Education magazine as one of the "founding fathers" of computer science.[5]Contents1 Family 2 Work2.1 Radio wave propagation 2.2 Computer science3 ReferencesFamily[edit] He is survived by his wife, Valerie, and two children, Nik and Jacky. Work[edit] Radio wave propagation[edit] Barron's work with Henry Rishbeth on radio wave propagation[6][7] was pioneering in furthering the understanding of how radio waves were reflected at the ionospheric boundary. Computer science[edit] Barron began his academic career in Cambridge University where he took a PhD in the Cavendish Laboratory
[...More...]

"David W. Barron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of London
The University of London
London
is a collegiate[a] and a federal research university located in London, England
[...More...]

"University Of London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

B (programming Language)
B is a programming language developed at Bell Labs
Bell Labs
circa 1969. It is the work of Ken Thompson
Ken Thompson
with Dennis Ritchie. B was derived from BCPL, and its name may be a contraction of BCPL. Thompson's coworker Dennis Ritchie
Dennis Ritchie
speculated that the name might be based on Bon, an earlier, but unrelated, programming language that Thompson designed for use on Multics.[note 1] B was designed for recursive, non-numeric, machine-independent applications, such as system and language software.[3]Contents1 History 2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Initially Ken Thompson[2] and later Dennis Ritchie[3] developed B basing it mainly on the BCPL language Thompson used in the Multics project
[...More...]

"B (programming Language)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Multi-paradigm Programming Language
Programming paradigms are a way to classify programming languages based on their features. Languages can be classified into multiple paradigms. Some paradigms are concerned mainly with implications for the execution model of the language, such as allowing side effects, or whether the sequence of operations is defined by the execution model. Other paradigms are concerned mainly with the way that code is organized, such as grouping a code into units along with the state that is modified by the code
[...More...]

"Multi-paradigm Programming Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.