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COL4A3
NM_031366NM_007734RefSeq (protein)NP_000082NP_031760Location (UCSC) Chr 2: 227.16 – 227.31 Mb Chr 1: 82.59 – 82.72 Mb PubMed
PubMed
search [3] [4]WikidataView/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse Collagen
Collagen
alpha-3(IV) chain is a protein that in humans is encoded by the COL4A3 gene.[5][6] Type IV collagen, the major structural component of basement membranes, is a multimeric protein composed of 3 alpha subunits. These subunits are encoded by 6 different genes, alpha 1 through alpha 6, each of which can form a triple helix structure with 2 other subunits to form type IV collagen. This gene encodes alpha 3. In Goodpasture's syndrome, autoantibodies bind to the collagen molecules in the basement membranes of alveoli and glomeruli. The epitopes that elicit these autoantibodies are localized largely to the non-collagenous C-terminal domain of the protein
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Gene Nomenclature
Gene
Gene
nomenclature is the scientific naming of genes, the units of heredity in living organisms
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Collagen, Type XIV, Alpha 1
Alpha
Alpha
(uppercase Α, lowercase α; Ancient Greek: ἄλφα, álpha, modern pronunciation álfa) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 1. It was derived from the Phoenician and Hebrew
Hebrew
letter aleph - an ox or leader.[1] Letters that arose from alpha include the Latin
Latin
A and the Cyrillic letter А. In English, the noun "alpha" is used as a synonym for "beginning", or "first" (in a series), reflecting its Greek roots.[2]Contents1 Uses1.1 Greek1.1.1 Greek grammar1.2 Math and science 1.3 International Phonetic Alphabet2 History and symbolism2.1 Etymology 2.2 Plutarch 2.3 Alpha
Alpha
and Omega 2.4 Language3 Computer encodings 4 ReferencesUses Greek In Ancient Greek, alpha was pronounced [a] and could be either phonemically long ([a:]) or short ([a])
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Collagen, Type IX, Alpha 1
Alpha
Alpha
(uppercase Α, lowercase α; Ancient Greek: ἄλφα, álpha, modern pronunciation álfa) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 1. It was derived from the Phoenician and Hebrew
Hebrew
letter aleph - an ox or leader.[1] Letters that arose from alpha include the Latin
Latin
A and the Cyrillic letter А. In English, the noun "alpha" is used as a synonym for "beginning", or "first" (in a series), reflecting its Greek roots.[2]Contents1 Uses1.1 Greek1.1.1 Greek grammar1.2 Math and science 1.3 International Phonetic Alphabet2 History and symbolism2.1 Etymology 2.2 Plutarch 2.3 Alpha
Alpha
and Omega 2.4 Language3 Computer encodings 4 ReferencesUses Greek In Ancient Greek, alpha was pronounced [a] and could be either phonemically long ([a:]) or short ([a])
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Type-I Collagen
Type 1 or Type I may refer to:US F1 Type 1, 2010 F1 Car Bugatti Type 1, an automobile Diabetes mellitus type 1
Diabetes mellitus type 1
(also known as " Type 1 Diabetes"), insulin-dependent diabetes
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Mouse Genome Informatics
Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) is a free, online database and bioinformatics resource hosted by The Jackson Laboratory, with funding by The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).[1] MGI provides access to data on the genetics, genomics and biology of the laboratory mouse to facilitate the study of human health and disease.[2][3] The database integrates multiple projects with the two largest contributions from the Mouse Genome Database and Gene Expression Database (GXD).[4] The Mouse Genome Informatics resource[5] is a collection of data, tools, and analyses created and tailored for use in the laboratory mouse, a widely used model organism
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Ensembl Genome Database Project
Ensembl
Ensembl
genome database project is a joint scientific project between the European Bioinformatics Institute
European Bioinformatics Institute
and
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Triple Helix
In geometry, a triple helix (plural triple helices) is a set of three congruent geometrical helices with the same axis, differing by a translation along the axis. As with a single helix, a triple helix may be characterized by its pitch and diameter. Structures in the form of a triple helix include:Collagen helix[1] Triple-stranded DNA[2] Triple-threaded worm gears[3] and screws[4]References[edit]^ Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter (2005), "Structure, Stability and Folding of the Collagen Triple Helix", in Brinckmann, Jürgen; Notbohm, Holger; Müller, P. K., Collagen: Primer in Structure, Processing and Assembly, Topics in Current Chemistry, 247, pp. 7–33, doi:10.1007/b103818 (inactive 2017-08-12), ISBN 978-3-540-23272-8  ^ Bernués, J.; Azorín, F. (1995), "Triple-stranded DNA", Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology, Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology, 9: 1–21, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-79488-9_1, ISBN 978-3-642-79490-2 . ^ Rattan, S. S
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Gene
A gene is a sequence of DNA
DNA
or RNA
RNA
which codes for a molecule that has a function. During gene expression, the DNA
DNA
is first copied into RNA. The RNA
RNA
can be directly functional or be the intermediate template for a protein that performs a function. The transmission of genes to an organism's offspring is the basis of the inheritance of phenotypic traits. These genes make up different DNA
DNA
sequences called genotypes. Genotypes along with environmental and developmental factors determine what the phenotypes will be. Most biological traits are under the influence of polygenes (many different genes) as well as gene–environment interactions
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Protein
Proteins (/ˈproʊˌtiːnz/ or /ˈproʊti.ɪnz/) are large biomolecules, or macromolecules, consisting of one or more long chains of amino acid residues. Proteins perform a vast array of functions within organisms, including catalysing metabolic reactions, DNA replication, responding to stimuli, and transporting molecules from one location to another. Proteins differ from one another primarily in their sequence of amino acids, which is dictated by the nucleotide sequence of their genes, and which usually results in protein folding into a specific three-dimensional structure that determines its activity. A linear chain of amino acid residues is called a polypeptide. A protein contains at least one long polypeptide. Short polypeptides, containing less than 20–30 residues, are rarely considered to be proteins and are commonly called peptides, or sometimes oligopeptides. The individual amino acid residues are bonded together by peptide bonds and adjacent amino acid residues
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Basement Membrane
The basement membrane is a thin, fibrous, extracellular matrix of tissue that separates the lining of an internal or external body surface from underlying connective tissue in metazoans.[1] This surface may be epithelium (skin, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, etc.), mesothelium (pleural cavity, peritoneal cavity, pericardial cavity, etc.) and endothelium (blood vessels, lymph vessels, etc.)Contents1 Structure 2 Function 3 Clinical significance 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingStructure[edit] As seen with electron microscope, the basement membrane is composed of two layers, the basal lamina and the underlying layer of reticular connective tissue. The underlying connective tissue attaches to the basal lamina with collagen VII anchoring fibrils and fibrillin microfibrils. The two layers together are collectively referred to as the basement membrane.[2] The basal lamina layer can further be divided into two layers
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PubMed
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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