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CNOH
The China
China
National Opera House (CNOH) or China
China
Central Opera (中央歌剧院) is a State-run opera company based in Beijing, China, and under the Chinese Ministry of Culture. CNOH consists of an opera troupe, a choir, a symphony orchestra and a stagecraft, costume and scenery departments. It is affiliated, through common direction under the Ministry of Culture, with the Shanghai Opera House
Shanghai Opera House
company and other geju companies around China.Contents1 History 2 Building 3 Productions in China 4 Tours abroad 5 Repertoire 6 People 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The China
China
Central Opera was preceded in Yan'an
Yan'an
in 1942 with the performance of the Yangko
Yangko
drama (秧歌剧) Brothers and Sisters Opening up the Wasteland (《兄妹开荒》),[1] and the White-Haired Girl
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China National Peking Opera Company
The China
China
National Peking Opera Company (CNPOC; Chinese: 中国国家京剧院), originally named the National Peking Opera Theater of China, is one of the national ensembles of performance arts directly under the supervision of the Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China.[1] Situated in Beijing, it was founded in January 1955, with opera performer Mei Lanfang
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Les Contes D'Hoffmann
The Tales of Hoffmann
The Tales of Hoffmann
(French: Les contes d'Hoffmann) is an opéra fantastique by Jacques Offenbach. The French libretto was written by Jules Barbier, based on three short stories by E. T. A. Hoffmann, who is the protagonist of the story
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Gianni Schicchi
Gianni Schicchi
Gianni Schicchi
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈdʒanni ˈskikki]) is a comic opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini
Giacomo Puccini
to an Italian libretto by Giovacchino Forzano, composed in 1917–18. The libretto is based on an incident mentioned in Dante's Divine Comedy. The work is the third and final part of Puccini's Il trittico
Il trittico
(The Triptych)—three one-act operas with contrasting themes, originally written to be presented together. Although it continues to be performed with one or both of the other trittico operas, Gianni Schicchi
Gianni Schicchi
is now more frequently staged either alone or with short operas by other composers
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Turandot
Turandot
Turandot
(UK: /ˈtjʊər.ən.dɒt/ or US: /ˈtʊr.ən.dɑːt/; Italian pronunciation: [turanˈdɔt]; see below) is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini, completed by Franco Alfano, and set to a libretto in Italian by Giuseppe Adami
Giuseppe Adami
and Renato Simoni. Though Puccini's first interest in the subject was based on his reading of Friedrich Schiller's 1801 adaptation of the play, his work is most nearly based on the earlier text Turandot
Turandot
(1762) by Count Carlo Gozzi. The original story is based on one of the seven stories in the epic Haft Peykar (The Seven Beauties), work of 12th-century Persian poet Nizami. Nizami aligned the seven stories with the seven days of the week, the seven colors and the seven corresponding planets. This particular story is the story of Monday ("moon day"), being told to King Bahram by his companion of the red dome
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Aida
Aida
Aida
(Italian: [aˈiːda]) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Antonio Ghislanzoni. Set in Egypt, it was commissioned by and first performed at Cairo's Khedivial Opera House on 24 December 1871; Giovanni Bottesini
Giovanni Bottesini
conducted after Verdi himself withdrew. Today the work holds a central place in the operatic canon, receiving performances every year around the world; at New York's Metropolitan Opera
Opera
alone, Aida
Aida
has been sung more than 1,100 times since 1886
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La Boheme
La bohème
La bohème
(French pronunciation: ​[la bɔ.ɛm], Italian: [la boˈɛm]) is an opera in four acts,[N 1] composed by Giacomo Puccini
Giacomo Puccini
to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica
Luigi Illica
and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Scènes de la vie de bohème by Henri Murger.[1] The world premiere performance of La bohème
La bohème
was in Turin
Turin
on 1 February 1896 at the Teatro Regio,[2] conducted by the young Arturo Toscanini; its U.S. premiere took place the following year, 1897, in Los Angeles. Since then, La bohème
La bohème
has become part of the standard Italian opera repertory and is one of the most frequently performed operas worldwide.[3] In 1946, fifty years after the opera's premiere, Toscanini
Toscanini
conducted a performance of it on radio with the NBC Symphony Orchestra
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Rigoletto
Rigoletto
Rigoletto
(pronounced [riɡoˈletto]) is an opera in three acts[1] by Giuseppe Verdi. The Italian libretto was written by Francesco Maria Piave
Francesco Maria Piave
based on the play Le roi s'amuse
Le roi s'amuse
by Victor Hugo. Despite serious initial problems with the Austrian censors who had control over northern Italian theatres at the time, the opera had a triumphant premiere at La Fenice
La Fenice
in Venice
Venice
on 11 March 1851. It is widely considered to be the first of the operatic masterpieces of Verdi's middle-to-late career. Its tragic story revolves around the licentious Duke of Mantua, his hunch-backed court jester Rigoletto, and Rigoletto's beautiful daughter Gilda
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The Marriage Of Figaro
The Marriage of Figaro
The Marriage of Figaro
(Italian: Le nozze di Figaro, pronounced [le ˈnɔttse di ˈfiːɡaro]), K. 492, is an opera buffa (comic opera) in four acts composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with an Italian libretto written by Lorenzo Da Ponte. It premiered at the Burgtheater
Burgtheater
in Vienna on 1 May 1786. The opera's libretto is based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, La folle journée, ou le Mariage de Figaro ("The Mad Day, or The Marriage of Figaro"), which was first performed in 1784
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Otello
Otello
Otello
(Italian pronunciation: [oˈtɛllo]) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi
Giuseppe Verdi
to an Italian libretto by Arrigo Boito, based on Shakespeare's play Othello
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Cavalleria Rusticana
Cavalleria rusticana
Cavalleria rusticana
(pronounced [kavalleˈriːa rustiˈkaːna]; Italian for "rustic chivalry") is an opera in one act by Pietro Mascagni to an Italian libretto by Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti and Guido Menasci, adapted from a play and short story written by Giovanni Verga. Considered one of the classic verismo operas, it premiered on 17 May 1890 at the Teatro Costanzi
Teatro Costanzi
in Rome
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The Barber Of Seville
The Barber of Seville, or The Useless Precaution (Italian: Il barbiere di Siviglia, ossia L'inutile precauzione [il barˈbjɛːre di siˈviʎʎa osˈsiːa liˈnuːtile prekautˈtsjoːne]) is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini
Gioachino Rossini
with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini. The libretto was based on Pierre Beaumarchais's French comedy Le Barbier de Séville (1775). The première of Rossini's opera (under the title Almaviva, o sia L'inutile precauzione) took place on 20 February 1816 at the Teatro Argentina, Rome.[1] Rossini's Barber has proven to be one of the greatest masterpieces of comedy within music, and has been described as the opera buffa of all "opere buffe"
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Le Roi D'Ys
Le roi d'Ys
Le roi d'Ys
(The King of Ys) is an opera in three acts and five tableaux by the French composer Édouard Lalo, to a libretto by Édouard Blau, based on the old Breton legend of the drowned city of Ys. That city was, according to the legend, the capital of the kingdom of Cornouaille. The opera was premiered on 7 May 1888 by the Opéra Comique
Opéra Comique
at the Théâtre Lyrique
Théâtre Lyrique
on the Place du Châtelet in Paris. Apart from the overture, the most famous piece in the opera is the tenor's aubade in act 3, "Vainement, ma bien-aimée" ("In vain, my beloved"). Lalo was known outside France primarily for other work, but within France he was recognized almost solely for this opera
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Opera Company
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Liu Hulan (opera)
Liu Hulan
Liu Hulan
(刘胡兰) is a 1954 Chinese-language western-style opera by Chen Zi. It is based on the death of a 14-year-old communist party girl Liu Hulan, who was elevated into a revolutionary martyr. Part of The original opera was composed in 1949, only 2 years after her death, and revised into a full-scale opera in 1954. Several other composers such as Ge Guangrui also contributed to Chen's opera.[1] A similar opera based on another revolutionary martyr is Sister Jiang. References[edit]^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2012-11-21. This article about an opera or opera-related subject is a stub
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Caoyuan Zhi Ge
Caoyuan zhi ge (《草原之歌》, "Song of the Steppes", "Song of the Grassland") is a 1955 Chinese-language western-style opera with music composed by Luo Zongxian (罗宗贤 b.1925).[1][2] References[edit]^ A Critical History of New Music in China - Page 345 C. C. Liu - 2010 "The success of Baimaonü [The white-haired girl] gave great encouragement to opera composers and writers, and new ... Caoyuan zhi ge [Song of the steppes] by Luo Jiaxian, Zhuo Mingli and Jin Zhengping; ^ Encyclopedia of Contemporary Chinese Culture - Page 307 Edward L. Davis - 2012 "In contrasts to Xiqu (sungdrama) which groups indigenous musical dramatic traditions like Peking opera, Geju is seen as ... Examples of Geju include The Song of the Grassland (Caoyuan zhi ge, 1955) by Luo Zongxian, and The Hundredth Bride (Di yibai ge xinniang, 1980) by Wang Shiguang and Cai Kexiang
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