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CFU-Baso
CFU-Baso is a colony forming unit.[1] that gives rise to basophils.[2] Some sources use the term "CFU-Bas".[3] References[edit]^ Tsuda T, Wong D, Dolovich J, Bienenstock J, Marshall J, Denburg JA (March 1991). "Synergistic effects of nerve growth factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on human basophilic cell differentiation". Blood. 77 (5): 971–9. PMID 1995103.  ^ Cotran, Ramzi S.; Kumar, Vinay; Fausto, Nelson; Nelso Fausto; Robbins, Stanley L.; Abbas, Abul K. (2005). Robbins and Cotran pathologic basis of disease. St. Louis, Mo: Elsevier Saunders. p. 621. ISBN 0-7216-0187-1.  ^ Talpaz, Moshe; Kurzrock, Razelle (1999). Molecular Biology in Cancer Medicine (2nd ed.). London: Taylor & Francis Group
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Cell (biology)
The cell (from Latin
Latin
cella, meaning "small room"[1]) is the basic structural, functional, and biological unit of all known living organisms. A cell is the smallest unit of life. Cells are often called the "building blocks of life"
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Cell Biology
Cell biology
Cell biology
(formerly called cytology, from the Greek κυτος, kytos, "vessel") is a branch of biology that studies the different structures and functions of the cell and focuses mainly on the idea of the cell as the basic unit of life. Cell biology
Cell biology
explains the structure, organization of the organelles they contain, their physiological properties, metabolic processes, signaling pathways, life cycle, and interactions with their environment. This is done both on a microscopic and molecular level as it encompasses prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. Knowing the components of cells and how cells work is fundamental to all biological sciences; it is also essential for research in bio-medical fields such as cancer, and other diseases
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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Monoblast
Monoblasts are normally found in bone marrow and do not appear in the normal peripheral blood. They mature into monocytes which, in turn, develop into macrophages.Contents1 Structure 2 Development 3 Additional images 4 See alsoStructure[edit] A typical monoblast is about 12 to 20 µm in diameter, has a nuclear to cytoplasm ratio of 4:1 to 3:1, and, like most myeloid blasts, has a round to oval nucleus with fine chromatin structure. One to four nucleoli are usually visible. The nucleus can be central or eccentric and it can show evidence of indentation or folding
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Band Cell
A band cell (also called band neutrophil, band form or stab cell) is a cell undergoing granulopoiesis, derived from a metamyelocyte, and leading to a mature granulocyte. It is characterized by having a curved but not lobular nucleus.[1] The term "band cell" implies a granulocytic lineage (e.g., neutrophils).[2]Contents1 Clinical significance 2 See also 3 Additional images 4 References 5 External linksClinical significance[edit] Band neutrophils are an intermediary step prior to the complete maturation of segmented neutrophils
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Megakaryoblast
A megakaryoblast is a precursor cell to a promegakaryocyte, which in turn becomes a megakaryocyte during haematopoiesis. It is the beginning of the thrombocytic series.Contents1 Development 2 Structure 3 References 4 External linksDevelopment[edit] The megakaryoblast derives from a CFU-Me colony unit of pluripotential hemopoietic stem cells. (Some sources use the term "CFU-Meg" to identify the CFU.[1]) The CFU-Meg derives from the CFU-GEMM
CFU-GEMM
(common myeloid progenitor). Structure[edit] These cells tend to range from 8μm to 30μm, owing to the variation in size between different megakaryoblasts.[2] The nucleus is three to five times the size of the cytoplasm, and is generally round or oval in shape. Several nucleoli are visible, while the chromatin varies from cell to cell, ranging from fine to heavy and dense. The cytoplasm is generally basophilic and stains blue
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Promegakaryocyte
A promegakaryocyte is a precursor cell for a megakaryocyte, arising from a megakaryoblast. The developmental stages of the megakaryocyte are: CFU-Me (pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell or hemocytoblast) → megakaryoblast → promegakaryocyte → megakaryocyte. When the megakaryoblast matures into the promegakaryocyte, it undergoes endoreduplication[1] and forms a promegakaryocyte which has multiple nuclei, azurophilic granules, and a basophilic cytoplasm.[2] The promegakaryocyte has rotary motion, but no forward migration.[3] References[edit]^ Khurana, Indu (November 20, 2009). Textbook of Human Physiology for Dental Students. Elsevier India. p. 141. ISBN 8131205924.  ^ Rozenberg, Gillian (December 19, 2002). Microscopic Haematology: A Practical Guide for the Laboratory (2nd ed.). CRC Press. p. 95. ISBN 1841842338.  ^ Hiraki, K.; Ofuji, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Sunami, H.; Awai, K. (January 31, 1956)
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Basophil
Basophils are a type of white blood cells. Basophils are the least common of the granulocytes, representing about 0.5 to 1% of circulating white blood cells.[2] However, they are the largest type of granulocyte. They are responsible for inflammatory reactions during immune response, as well as in the formation of acute and chronic allergic diseases, including anaphylaxis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and hay fever.[3] They can perform phagocytosis (cell eating), produce histamine and serotonin that induce inflammation, and heparin that prevents blood clotting[4], although there are less than that found in Mast cell
Mast cell
granules[5]
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Megakaryocyte
A megakaryocyte (mega- + karyo- + -cyte, "large-nucleus cell") is a large bone marrow cell with a lobulated nucleus responsible for the production of blood thrombocytes (platelets), which are necessary for normal blood clotting. Megakaryocytes usually account for 1 out of 10,000 bone marrow cells in normal people, but can increase in number nearly 10-fold during the course of certain diseases.[1] Owing to variations in combining forms and spelling, synonyms include megalokaryocyte and megacaryocyte.Contents1 Structure 2 Development 3 Function3.1 Platelet
Platelet
release 3.2 Effects of cytokines 3.3 Thrombopoietin4 Clinical significance4.1 Essential thrombocytosis 4.2 Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia5 History 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit] In general, megakaryocytes are 10 to 15 times larger than a typical red blood cell, averaging 50–100 μm in diameter
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CFU-DL
CFU-DL is a colony forming unit that gives rise to Langerhans cells.[1][2] References[edit]^ Reid CD, Stackpoole A, Meager A, Tikerpae J (October 1992). "Interactions of tumor necrosis factor with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and other cytokines in the regulation of dendritic cell growth in vitro from early bipotent CD34+ progenitors in human bone marrow". J. Immunol. 149 (8): 2681–8. PMID 1383322.  ^ Klaus Rabe; Stockley, Robert A.; Steve Rennard (2006). Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers. p. 220
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Mononuclear Phagocyte System
In immunology, the mononuclear phagocyte system or mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) (also known as the reticuloendothelial system or macrophage system) is a part of the immune system that consists of the phagocytic cells[1] located in reticular connective tissue. The cells are primarily monocytes and macrophages, and they accumulate in lymph nodes and the spleen. The Kupffer cells of the liver and tissue histiocytes are also part of the MPS
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Platelet
Platelets, also called thrombocytes (thromb- + -cyte, "blood clot cell"), are a component of blood whose function (along with the coagulation factors) is to stop bleeding by clumping and clotting blood vessel injuries.[1] Platelets have no cell nucleus: they are fragments of cytoplasm that are derived from the megakaryocytes[2] of the bone marrow, and then enter the circulation. These unactivated platelets are biconvex discoid (lens-shaped) structures,[3][4] 2–3 µm in greatest diameter.[5] Platelets are found only in mammals, whereas in other animals (e.g. birds, amphibians) thrombocytes circulate as intact mononuclear cells.[6]The ligands, denoted by letter L, signal for platelets (P) to migrate towards the wound (Site A). As more platelets gather around the opening, they produce more ligands to amplify the response
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CFU-Meg
CFU-Meg is a colony forming unit. It leads to the production of megakaryocytes.[1][2][3] Some sources prefer the term "CFU-Mega".[4] See also[edit]ThrombopoietinReferences[edit]^ Kimura H, Ohkoshi T, Matsuda S, Uchida T, Kariyone S (1988). "Megakaryocytopoiesis in polycythemia vera: characterization by megakaryocytic progenitors (CFU-Meg) in vitro and quantitation of marrow megakaryocytes". Acta Haematol. 79 (1): 1–6. doi:10.1159/000205681. PMID 3124455.  ^ Kimura H, Ishibashi T, Sato T, Matsuda S, Uchida T, Kariyone S (January 1987). "Megakaryocytic colony formation (CFU-Meg) in essential thrombocythemia: quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of bone marrow CFU-Meg". Am. J. Hematol. 24 (1): 23–30. doi:10.1002/ajh.2830240104
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