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Côte D'or
Côte-d'Or
Côte-d'Or
(IPA: [kot dɔʁ]; literally, "golden slope") is a department in the eastern part of France.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Climate 4 Politics 5 Economy 6 Demographics 7 Tourism 8 See also 9 External linksHistory[edit] Côte-d'Or
Côte-d'Or
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on 4 March 1790. It was formed from part of the former province of Burgundy. Geography[edit] The department is part of the current region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté. It is surrounded by the departments of Yonne, Nièvre, Saône-et-Loire, Jura, Aube, and Haute-Marne. A chain of hills called the Plateau de Langres runs from north-east to south-west through the department to the north of Dijon
Dijon
and continues south-westwards as the Côte d'Or escarpment, which takes its name from that of the department
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Côte-d'Or (other)
Côte d'Or, meaning Golden Coast may refer to:Côte-d'Or, French department Gold Coast (British colony), part of the coast of the West African Gulf of Guinea Côte d'Or (brand)
Côte d'Or (brand)
Belgian chocolate brand owned by Mondelēz International, a subsidiary of Kraft Foods Côte d'Or
Côte d'Or
(e
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Escarpment
An escarpment is a steep slope or long cliff that forms as an effect of faulting or erosion and separates two relatively leveled areas having differing elevations. Usually escarpment is used interchangeably with scarp. Some sources differentiate the two terms, however, where escarpment refers to the margin between two landforms, while scarp is synonymous with a cliff or steep slope.[1][2] The surface of the steep slope is called a scarp face
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Province Of France
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Burgundy (historical Region)
Burgundy
Burgundy
(French: Bourgogne, IPA: [buʁɡɔɲ] ( listen)) is a historical territory and a former administrative region of France
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Yonne
Yonne
Yonne
(French pronunciation: ​[jɔn]) is a French department named after the river Yonne. It is one of the eight constituent departments of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
and is located in the northwest of the region, bordering Île-de-France. It was created in 1790 during the French Revolution. Its prefecture (capital) is Auxerre and its postcode number is 89. It is the fourth most populous department in the region with a population of about 342,000 (2012), and an average annual increase over the last few years of 0.41% per year
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Nièvre
Nièvre
Nièvre
(IPA: [njɛvʁ]) is a department in the region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
in the centre of France
France
named after the River Nièvre.[1]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demography 4 Wines 5 Politics 6 Tourism 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Nièvre
Nièvre
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on 4 March 1790. It was created from the former province of Nivernais. Geography[edit] Nièvre
Nièvre
is part of the current region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté,[1] although historically it was not part of the province of Burgundy. It is surrounded by the departments of Yonne, Côte-d'Or, Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Cher, and Loiret
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Saône-et-Loire
Saône-et- Loire
Loire
(French pronunciation: ​[sonelwaʁ]; Arpitan: Sona-et-Lêre) is a French department, named after the Saône and the Loire
Loire
rivers between which it lies.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Principal towns3 Subdivisions 4 Tourism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] When it was formed during the French Revolution, as of March 4, 1790 in fulfillment of the law of December 22, 1789, the new department combined parts of the provinces of southern Burgundy and Bresse, uniting lands that had no previous common history nor political unity and which have no true geographical unity. Thus its history is that of Burgundy, and is especially to be found in the local histories of Autun, Mâcon, Chalon-sur-Saône, Charolles
Charolles
and Louhans. Geography[edit] Saône-et- Loire
Loire
is the seventh largest department of France
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Jura (department)
Jura (French pronunciation: ​[ʒyʁa]) is a department in the east of France
France
named after the Jura mountains.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Politics 4 Climate 5 Economy 6 Tourism 7 See also 8 External linksHistory[edit] Historically, Jura belonged to the Free County of Burgundy, known in French as the Franche-Comté. Dole was the capital until the region was conquered by Louis XIV and the capital was moved to Besançon. Dole is now a sous-préfecture, or sub-prefecture, of Jura. As early as the 13th century, inhabitants of the southern two-thirds of Jura spoke a dialect of Arpitan
Arpitan
language. It continued to be spoken in rural areas into the 20th century. Jura is one of the original 83 departments, it being the created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on March 4, 1790. It was created from part of the former province of Franche-Comté
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Aube
Aube
Aube
(French pronunciation: ​[ob]) is a French department in the Grand Est
Grand Est
region of north-eastern France. As with sixty departments in France, this department is named after a river: the Aube. With 305,606 inhabitants (2012), Aube
Aube
is 76th department in terms of population
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Haute-Marne
Haute- Marne
Marne
(French pronunciation: ​[ot.maʁn]) is a department in the northeast of France
France
named after the Marne
Marne
River.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Tourism 4 Politics 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Haute- Marne
Marne
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on March 4, 1790. It was created from parts of the former provinces of Champagne, Burgundy, Lorraine and Franche-Comté.[1] In March 1814 the departmental prefecture, Chaumont, was the unwitting witness to the end of the First Empire
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Côte D'Or (escarpment)
The Côte d'Or is a limestone escarpment in Burgundy, France
France
that lends its name to the department which was formed around it. It stretches from Dijon
Dijon
in the north to the river Dheune to the south, overlooking the valley of the Saône
Saône
to the east. The east-facing slope of the Côte d'Or is home to some of the greatest names of Burgundy wine, such as Gevrey-Chambertin, Clos de Vougeot, Meursault
Meursault
and Montrachet. The northern half, the Côte de Nuits, produces red wine almost exclusively. The Côte de Beaune, around Beaune
Beaune
in the south, produces a mix of white wine and red wine. The Route des Grands Crus
Route des Grands Crus
(Route Nationale 74) runs along the foot of the ridge and is popular with tourists
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Burgundy Wine
Burgundy
Burgundy
wine (French: Bourgogne or vin de Bourgogne) is wine made in the Burgundy
Burgundy
region in eastern France,[1] in the valleys and slopes west of the Saône, a tributary of the Rhône. The most famous wines produced here—those commonly referred to as "Burgundies"—are dry red wines made from Pinot noir
Pinot noir
grapes and white wines made from Chardonnay
Chardonnay
grapes. Red and white wines are also made from other grape varieties, such as Gamay
Gamay
and Aligoté, respectively. Small amounts of rosé and sparkling wines are also produced in the region
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Communes Of The Côte-d'Or Department
The following is a list of the 704 communes of the Côte-d'Or department of France. The communes cooperate in the following intercommunalities (as of 2017):Dijon Métropole Communauté d'agglomération Beaune, Côte et Sud (partly) Communauté de communes Auxonne Pontailler Val de Saône Communauté de communes Forêts, Seine et Suzon Communauté de communes de Gevrey-Chambertin et de Nuits-Saint-Georges Communauté de communes Mirebellois et Fontenois Communauté de communes du Montbardois Communauté de communes Norge et Tille Communauté de communes Ouche et Montagne Communauté de communes du Pays Arnay Liernais Communauté de communes du Pays Châtillonnais Communauté de communes du Pays d'Alésia et de la Seine Communauté de communes de la Plaine Dijonnaise Communauté de communes de Pouilly-en-Auxois et Bligny-sur-Ouche Communauté de communes Rives de Saône Communauté de communes de Saulieu Communauté de communes des Terres d'Auxois Communauté de communes Tille et
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Vineyard
A vineyard /ˈvɪnjərd/ is a plantation of grape-bearing vines, grown mainly for winemaking, but also raisins, table grapes and non-alcoholic grape juice. The science, practice and study of vineyard production is known as viticulture. A vineyard is often characterised by its terroir, a French term loosely translating as "a sense of place" that refers to the specific geographical and geological characteristics of grapevine plantations, which may be imparted in the wine.Contents1 History 2 Modern practices 3 Current trends 4 Terroir 5 Vignette 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit]Satyrs in vineyard. Attic red-figure volute-krater, ca
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