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Cædmon's Hymn
Cædmon's Hymn
Hymn
is a short Old English
Old English
poem originally composed by Cædmon, an illiterate cow-herder who was able to sing in honour of God the Creator, using words that he had never heard before. It was composed between 658 and 680 and is the oldest recorded Old English poem, being composed within living memory of the Christianization of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
England. It is also one of the oldest surviving samples of Germanic alliterative verse. The Hymn
Hymn
is Cædmon's sole surviving composition. It was designed to be sung from memory and was later preserved in written form by others, surviving today in at least 19 verified manuscript copies. The poem has passed down from a Latin
Latin
translation by Bede
Bede
in his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum
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National Library Of Russia
National
National
may refer to: Nation or country Nationality
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Caesura
A caesura (/siːˈʒjʊərə/ or /sɪˈʒʊrə/, pl. caesuras or caesurae; Latin
Latin
for "cutting"), also written cæsura and cesura, is a break in a verse where one phrase ends and the following phrase begins. It may be a comma, a tick, or two slashed lines //. In time value this break may vary between the slightest perception of silence all the way up to a full pause. Considered a breath, a caesura in music represents a similar break or pause.[1] The length of a caesura where notated is at the discretion of the conductor
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St. Petersburg
Saint
Saint
Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, tr. Sankt-Peterburg, IPA: [ˈsankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with five million inhabitants in 2012.[9] An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject (a federal city). Situated on the Neva
Neva
River, at the head of the Gulf of Finland
Gulf of Finland
on the Baltic Sea, it was founded by Tsar
Tsar
Peter the Great
Peter the Great
on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703
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Speculum (journal)
Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies is a quarterly academic journal published by University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press
on behalf of the Medieval Academy of America. It was established in 1926. The journal's primary focus is on the time period from 500 to 1500 in Western Europe, but also on related subjects such as Byzantine, Hebrew, Arabic, Armenian and Slavic studies. As of 2016[update], the editor is Sarah Spence. The organization and its journal were first proposed in 1921 at a meeting of the Modern Language Association, and the journal's focus was interdisciplinary from its beginning,[1] with one reviewer noting a specific interest in Medieval Latin.[2] References[edit]^ Greenlaw, Edwin (1926). "Reviewed Work(s): Speculum: A Journal of Mediaeval Studies. by The Mediaeval Academy of America". Modern Language Notes. 41 (4): 271–273.  ^ McK., R. B. (1926). "Reviewed Work(s): Speculum". The Review of English Studies
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Gloss (annotation)
A gloss (from Latin
Latin
glossa; from Greek γλῶσσα (glóssa), meaning 'language') is a brief notation, especially a marginal one or an interlinear one, of the meaning of a word or wording in a text. It may be in the language of the text, or in the reader's language if that is different. A collection of glosses is a glossary. A collection of medieval legal glosses, made by glossators, is called an apparatus. The compilation of glosses into glossaries was the beginning of lexicography, and the glossaries so compiled were in fact the first dictionaries. In modern times a glossary, as opposed to a dictionary, is typically found in a text as an appendix of specialized terms that the typical reader may find unfamiliar. Also, satirical explanations of words and events are called glosses
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West Sexaon Dialect (Old English)
Wessex
Wessex
(/ˈwɛsɪks/; Old English: Westseaxna rīce [westsæɑksnɑ riːt͡ʃe], "kingdom of the West Saxons") was an Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan
Æthelstan
in the early 10th century. The Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
believed that Wessex
Wessex
was founded by Cerdic and Cynric, but this may be a legend. The two main sources for the history of Wessex
Wessex
are the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
and the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List, which sometimes conflict. Wessex
Wessex
became a Christian kingdom after Cenwalh was baptised and was expanded under his rule. Cædwalla
Cædwalla
later conquered Sussex, Kent
Kent
and the Isle of Wight
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Midgard
Midgard
Midgard
(an anglicised form of Old Norse
Old Norse
Miðgarðr; Old English Middangeard, Swedish and Danish Midgård, Old Saxon
Old Saxon
Middilgard, Old High German Mittilagart, Gothic Midjun-gards; literally "middle yard") is the name for Earth
Earth
(equivalent in meaning to the Greek term οἰκουμένη, "inhabited") inhabited by and known to humans in early Germanic cosmology, and specifically one of the Nine Worlds in Norse mythology.Contents1 Etymology 2 Old Norse 3 Old and Middle English 4 Old High German 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit]Look up middangeard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Look up 𐌼𐌹𐌳𐌾𐌿𐌽𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌳𐍃 in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.This name occurs in Old Norse
Old Norse
literature as Miðgarðr
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Hymn
A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification. The word hymn derives from Greek ὕμνος (hymnos), which means "a song of praise". A writer of hymns is known as a hymnodist. The singing or composition of hymns is called hymnody. Collections of hymns are known as hymnals or hymn books. Hymns may or may not include instrumental accompaniment. Although most familiar to speakers of English in the context of Christianity, hymns are also a fixture of other world religions, especially on the Indian subcontinent. Hymns also survive from antiquity, especially from Egyptian and Greek cultures
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Hymnody
A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification. The word hymn derives from Greek ὕμνος (hymnos), which means "a song of praise". A writer of hymns is known as a hymnodist. The singing or composition of hymns is called hymnody. Collections of hymns are known as hymnals or hymn books. Hymns may or may not include instrumental accompaniment. Although most familiar to speakers of English in the context of Christianity, hymns are also a fixture of other world religions, especially on the Indian subcontinent. Hymns also survive from antiquity, especially from Egyptian and Greek cultures
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Alliterative Poetry
In prosody, alliterative verse is a form of verse that uses alliteration as the principal ornamental device to help indicate the underlying metrical structure, as opposed to other devices such as rhyme. The most commonly studied traditions of alliterative verse are those found in the oldest literature of the Germanic languages, where scholars use the term 'alliterative poetry' rather broadly to indicate a tradition which not only shares alliteration as its primary ornament but also certain metrical characteristics. The Old English epic Beowulf, as well as most other Old English poetry, the Old High German Muspilli, the Old Saxon Heliand, the Old Norse Poetic Edda, and many Middle English poems such as Piers Plowman, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Alliterative Morte Arthur all use alliterative verse.[a] Alliterative verse can be found in many other languages as well. The Finnish Kalevala and the Estonian Kalevipoeg both use alliterative forms derived from folk tradition
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Oral-formulaic Theory In Anglo-Saxon Poetry
Oral-formulaic theory in Anglo-Saxon poetry refers to the application of the hypotheses of Milman Parry and Albert Lord on the Homeric Question to verse written in Old English. That is, the theory proposes that certain features of at least some of the poetry may be explained by positing oral-formulaic composition. While Anglo-Saxon (Old English) epic poetry may bear some resemblance to Ancient Greek epics such as the Iliad and Odyssey, the question of if and how Anglo-Saxon poetry was passed down through an oral tradition remains a subject of debate, and the question for any particular poem unlikely to be answered with perfect certainty. Parry and Lord had already demonstrated the density of metrical formulas in Ancient Greek
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Laurence Nowell
Laurence (or Lawrence) Nowell (c. 1515 – c. 1571) was an English antiquarian, cartographer and pioneering scholar of Anglo-Saxon language and literature.Nowell's self-portrait with an empty purse, from the lower left corner of the pocket map he prepared for William Cecil.Contents1 Life 2 Identification 3 References 4 NotesLife[edit] Laurence Nowell was born around 1530 in Whalley, Lancashire, the second son of Alexander Nowell of Read Hall and Grace Catterall of Great Mitton, Lancashire. He may have started school at Whalley Abbey and sometime later may have attended Westminster School, where his cousin Alexander Nowell was a master from 1543 on, until in 1549 he attended Christ Church, Oxford, where he received an M.A. in 1552. He travelled to Paris, in 1553, then to Rouen, Antwerp, Louvain, Geneva, Venice, Padua and Rome by 1557/58
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Names Of God In Old English Poetry
In Old English poetry, many descriptive epithets for God were used to satisfy alliterative requirements
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Caedmon's Song
Caedmon's Song is a novel written by Canadian crime writer Peter Robinson in 1990. Also known in the United States and Canada as The First Cut, it was Robinson's first novel not to feature Inspector Alan Banks. Although seemingly unrelated to the Banks series, Caedmon's Song is revisited in Robinson's Inspector Alan Banks novel Friend of the Devil, wherein the story is brought together with that from an earlier Banks novel, Aftermath, published in 1999 and 2007 respectively.Contents1 Plot 2 Analysis2.1 Characters 2.2 Structure 2.3 Setting 2.4 History 2.5 The Yorkshire Ripper 2.6 Literature 2.7 Personalities 2.8 Greg Eastcote 2.9 Leitmotifs3 ReferencesPlot[edit] One warm June night, a university student called Kirsten is viciously attacked in a park by a serial killer. He is interrupted, and Kirsten survives, but in a severe physically and psychologically damaged state
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Peter Robinson (novelist)
Peter Robinson (born March 17, 1950) is an English-Canadian crime writer. He is best known for his crime novels set in Yorkshire featuring Inspector Alan Banks. He has also published a number of other novels and short stories as well as some poems and two articles on writing.Contents1 Life and work 2 Personal life 3 Bibliography3.1 Inspector Banks series 3.2 Other works 3.3 Awards4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Robinson was awarded a BA Honours Degree in English Literature at the University of Leeds
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