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Byzantine Rite
The Byzantine Rite, also known as the Greek Rite or Constantinopolitan Rite, is the liturgical rite used by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
as well as by certain Eastern Catholic Churches; also, parts of it are employed by, as detailed below, other denominations. Its development began during the fourth century in Constantinople
Constantinople
and it is now the second most-used ecclesiastical rite in Christendom
Christendom
after the Roman Rite. The Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
was originally developed and used in Greek language and later, with introduction of Eastern Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
to other ethnic groups it was translated into local languages and continued further development. Historically, most important non-Greek variants of Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
are: Byzantine-Slavonic and Byzantine-Georgian
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Apostolic Succession
Apostolic succession
Apostolic succession
is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church
Christian Church
is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.[1] This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles. According to historian Justo L. González, apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles.[2] According to the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Orthodox Church, "apostolic succession" means more than a mere transmission of powers
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Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
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Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Ascension Of Jesus
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eAccording to the Bible, the Ascension of Jesus
Jesus
(anglicized from the Vulgate
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Resurrection Of Jesus
The resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus
Jesus
rose again from the dead
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Crucifixion Of Jesus
The crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
occurred in 1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources,[1] although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.[2][3][4] According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans.[5][6][7][8] Jesus
Jesus
was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
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Sanctuary
A sanctuary, in its original meaning, is a sacred place, such as a shrine. By the use of such places as a haven, by extension the term has come to be used for any place of safety
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History Of Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Holy Doors
The royal doors, holy doors, or beautiful gates are the central doors of the iconostasis in an Eastern Orthodox or Eastern Catholic church. In Orthodox Churches, the sanctuary is separated from the nave by a wooden screen called the iconostasis. The iconostasis represents Christian continuity from the veil of the Temple in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
which separated the people from the Holy of Holies
Holy of Holies
that housed the Ark of the Covenant. Normally, the iconostasis has three doors in it. The two single doors to the right and left are called "deacons' doors" or "angel doors" and they usually have on them icons of either sainted deacons ( Saint
Saint
Stephen, Saint
Saint
Lawrence, etc.) or the Archangels Michael and Gabriel. These are the doors that the clergy will normally use when entering the altar
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Christ Pantocrator
In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ)[1] is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God
God
in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth "Lord of Hosts"[2] and for El Shaddai " God
God
Almighty".[3] In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18) and nine times in the Book of Revelation: 1:8, 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, and 21:22
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Deacon
A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. In many traditions the diaconate is a clerical office; in others it is for laity
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Uglich Cathedral
Uglich (Russian: Углич, IPA: [ˈuɡlʲɪtɕ]) is a historic town in Yaroslavl Oblast, Russia, which stands on the Volga River. Population: 34,507 (2010 Census);[5] 38,260 (2002 Census);[9] 39,975 (1989 Census).[10]Contents1 History1.1 Reign of Ivan the Terrible 1.2 Death of Tsarevich Dmitry 1.3 Later history2 Administrative and municipal status 3 Architecture 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Sources5 External linksHistory[edit] A local tradition dates the town's origins to 937.[citation needed] It was first documented in 1148 as Ugliche Pole (Corner Field).[citation needed] The town's name is thought to allude to the nearby turn in the Volga River. Uglich had been the seat of a small princedom from 1218 until 1328 when the local princes sold their rights to the great prince of Moscow
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Nave
The nave /neɪv/ is the central aisle of a basilica church, or the main body of a church (whether aisled or not) between its rear wall and the far end of its intersection with the transept at the chancel. It is the zone of a church accessible by the laity.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 History 4 Record-holders 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles[2] separated from the nave by an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave, the structure is sometimes said to have three naves. It provides the central approach to the high altar. Etymology[edit] The term nave is from navis, the Latin
Latin
word for ship, an early Christian symbol.[3][4] The term may also have been suggested by the keel shape of the vaulting of a church
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Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism
The degrees of Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation. In the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.Contents1 Orthodox monasticism 2 Degrees2.1 Novice 2.2 Rassophore 2.3 Stavrophore 2.4 Great Schema3 Coptic Orthodox monastic degrees 4 See also 5 External linksOrthodox monasticism[edit] Unlike in Western Christianity, where individual religious orders and societies arose, each with its own profession rites, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, there is only one type of monasticism
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