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Bv 238
The Blohm & Voss BV 238 was a German flying boat built during World War II. It was the heaviest aircraft ever built when it first flew in 1944, and was the largest aircraft produced by any of the Axis powers during World War II.[2]Contents1 History 2 Design 3 BV 250 4 Specifications (BV 238A-02 (V6)) 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Development of the BV 238 giant flying boat began in 1941, following the success of the smaller but still enormous BV 222 Wiking. An approximately quarter-scale model of the BV 238 was commissioned to test the new, long and slim hull design. Built by the Czechoslovakian Flugtechnische Fertigungsgemeinschaft Prag (FGP), the FGP 227 arrived too late to contribute any data to the program.[1][3] Although extensive defensive armament was planned the first prototype, the BV 238 V1, had none
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Flying Boat
A flying boat is a fixed-winged seaplane with a hull, allowing it to land on water, that usually has no type of landing gear to allow operation on land.[1] It differs from a floatplane as it uses a purpose-designed fuselage which can float, granting the aircraft buoyancy. Flying boats may be stabilized by under-wing floats or by wing-like projections (called sponsons) from the fuselage. Flying boats were some of the largest aircraft of the first half of the 20th century, exceeded in size only by bombers developed during World War II. Their advantage lay in using water instead of expensive land-based runways, making them the basis for international airlines in the interwar period. They were also commonly used for maritime patrol and air-sea rescue. Their use gradually trailed off after World War II, partially because of the investments in airports during the war
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Blohm & Voss Ha 140
The Blohm & Voss Ha 140 was a German multi-purpose seaplane first flown in 1937. It was intended for use as a torpedo bomber or long-range reconnaissance aircraft, but did not enter production.Contents1 Design and development 2 Specifications (Ha 140 V2) 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksDesign and development[edit] The Ha 140 was developed to meet a requirement for a twin-engine floatplane reconnaissance/torpedo bomber. The Ha 140 had an all-metal structure of conventional cantilever monoplane layout, with twin floats on pylons beneath its twin wing-mounted engines. The high-mounted wing had a straight centre section and slight dihedral on the outer sections. The crew consisted of a pilot and radio operator, with a gunner in a revolving turret in the nose or in a second gun position to the rear. The torpedo or bomb load was accommodated in an internal bomb bay. Three prototypes were built and the design beat the competing Heinkel He 115
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List Of Seaplanes And Amphibious Aircraft
The following is a list of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft, which includes floatplanes and flying boats, by country of origin. Seaplanes are any aircraft that has the capability of landing on water while amphibious aircraft are equipped with wheels to alight on land, as well as being able to land on the water. Flying boats rely on the fuselage or hull for buoyancy, while floatplanes rely on external pontoons or floats
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
(HFB) was an aircraft manufacturer, located primarily in the Finkenwerder
Finkenwerder
quarter of Hamburg, Germany. Established in 1933 as an offshoot of Blohm & Voss shipbuilders, it later became an operating division within its parent company and was known as Abteilung Flugzeugbau der Schiffswerft Blohm & Voss from 1937 until it ceased operation at the end of World War II. In the postwar period it was revived as an independent company under its original name and subsequently joined several consortia before being merged to form MBB
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Hamburger Flugzeugbau Ha 135
The Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Ha 135 was the first aircraft produced by the new aircraft subsidiary of the German company Blohm & Voss.Contents1 Development 2 Operational history 3 Specifications 4 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The two-seat biplane manufactured by the Hamburger Flugzeugbau subsidiary of Blohm & Voss was a means of giving the company experience in making modern metal components for civil and military aircraft. It was developed as a trainer for the German Ministry of Aviation. After it proved unsuccessful in this role, the company sold it as a sport aircraft.[1] Operational history[edit] The first prototype, designated the Ha 135 V1 (company production number 101, registration D-EXIL), made its first flight on 28 April 1934
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Hamburger Flugzeugbau Ha 136
The Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Ha 136 was an all-metal, single-seat training monoplane. It was the first design for the company by Dr. Richard Vogt and the first to feature his trademark tubular steel wing spar which doubled as the main fuel tank. Two prototypes were built but it was not ordered into production. Design[edit] Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
had been set up by the owners of Blohm & Voss shipbuilders to manufacture advanced all-metal aircraft. Dr. Richard Vogt had decided to adopt as a signature feature the use of a hollow welded steel tubular main wing spar, which could be filled with fuel to act as an armoured fuel tank. In other respects the design was relatively conventional.[1] A conventional low-wing cantilever monoplane with nose-mounted engine and fixed spatted tailwheel undercarriage, the plane accommodated its pilot in an open cockpit above the wing aft section
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Hamburger Flugzeugbau Ha 137
The Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Hamburger Flugzeugbau
Ha 137 was a German ground-attack aircraft of the 1930s. It was Blohm & Voss' entry into the contest to equip the re-forming Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
with its first purpose-built dive bomber. Although the contest would eventually be won by the Junkers
Junkers
Ju 87, the Ha 137 demonstrated that B&V's Hamburger Flugzeugbau, not even two years old at this point, had a truly capable design team of its own. One Ha 137 single-seat prototype competed against the Henschel Hs 123
Henschel Hs 123
at Rechlin.Contents1 Design and development 2 Specifications (Ha 137 V4) 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 BibliographyDesign and development[edit] Hamburger had already designed a biplane trainer of no particular distinction, the Ha 135 under its first designer, Reinhold Mewes. Mewes then left to join another small company, Fieseler
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Blohm & Voss BV 138
The Blohm & Voss BV 138 Seedrache (Sea Dragon), but nicknamed Der Fliegende Holzschuh ("flying clog",[1] from the side-view shape of its fuselage) was a World War II
World War II
German trimotor flying boat that served as the Luftwaffe's main seaborne long-range maritime patrol and naval reconnaissance aircraft. A total of 297 BV 138s were built between 1938 and 1943.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Variants 4 Surviving aircraft 5 Specifications (BV 138 C-1) 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksDesign and development[edit]A prototype Ha 138Originally developed under the company name of Hamburger Flugzeugbau, the type was initially designated the Ha 138. Its appearance was unique in its combination of unusual design features with its twin boom tail unit, short fuselage and trimotor engine configuration
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Blohm & Voss Ha 139
The Blohm & Voss Ha 139 was a German all-metal inverted gull wing floatplane. With its four engines it was at the time one of the largest float-equipped seaplanes that had been built. The inboard engines were mounted at the joint between the inboard anhedral and outboard dihedral wing sections, above the pylon-mounted floats. Further development of the Ha 139 led to the land based version Blohm & Voss BV 142 which had its first flight in October 1938.Contents1 Operational history 2 Variants 3 Specifications (Ha 139B/Umbau) 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOperational history[edit]A Ha 139 on board the catapult ship Friesenland.The aircraft were flown by Deutsche Luft Hansa
Deutsche Luft Hansa
on transatlantic routes between 1937 and 1939, predominately between Bathurst, The Gambia
The Gambia
and Natal, Brazil
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Blohm & Voss BV 141
The Blohm & Voss BV 141 was a World War II
World War II
German tactical reconnaissance aircraft. It is notable for its uncommon structural asymmetry. Although the Blohm & Voss BV 141 performed well, it was never ordered into full-scale production, for reasons that included the unavailability of the preferred engine and competition from another tactical reconnaissance aircraft, the Focke-Wulf Fw 189.Contents1 Development 2 Design 3 Operational history 4 Variants4.1 Prototypes 4.2 Pre-series BV 141 A-0 4.3 Pre-series BV 141 B-0 4.4 Series BV 141 B-15 Specifications (BV 141 B-02 [V10]) 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Citations 7.3 Bibliography8 External linksDevelopment[edit] In 1937, the German Air Ministry – the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) – issued a specification for a single-engine reconnaissance aircraft with optimal visual characteristics
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Short Shetland
The Short Shetland was a British high-speed, long-range, four-engined flying boat built by Short Brothers
Short Brothers
at Rochester, Kent
Rochester, Kent
for use in the Second World War. It was designed to meet an Air Ministry
Air Ministry
requirement (defined in Specification R.14/40) for a very-long range reconnaissance flying boat. The design used the company's experience with large scale production of the Short Sunderland
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Blohm & Voss BV 142
The Blohm & Voss Ha 142 was a German civil aircraft developed for the transatlantic airmail service, originally designed for the German national airline Luft Hansa. The first prototype was flown on 11 October 1938.Contents1 Design 2 Operations 3 Specifications (BV 142 V2/U1) 4 See also 5 ReferencesDesign[edit] The Ha 142 was a landplane version of the Blohm & Voss Ha 139 seaplane. Like its predecessor it had four engines mounted on a low inverted gull monoplane wing, high horizontal stabilizer, and a double vertical tail. The wing center section was strengthened by a typical Blohm & Voss cross-girder, which consisted of a large-diameter pipe. This transverse tube (divided internally into five sections) also acted as a fuel tank. The center wing was metal-covered, while the outer wings were fabric-covered. There were six hydraulically-operated flaps in the mid-wing
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Blohm & Voss BV 144
The Blohm & Voss BV 144 was an advanced twin-engined commercial airliner developed by Germany
Germany
during World War II
World War II
but intended for post-war service. It was unusual in having a variable-incidence wing. Two prototypes were built by Breguet in France.Contents1 Design 2 History 3 Specifications (BV 144 V1) 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksDesign[edit] The BV 144 was an all-metal cantilever monoplane of broadly conventional layout with a high wing and twin tail fins. It had a crew of three and was intended to carry 18 to 23 passengers. A unique feature of the BV 144 was the variable-incidence wing
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