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Buzz (dinghy)
The Buzz is a sailing dinghy designed in 1994 by Ian Howlett and manufactured by Reg White Limited of Brightlingsea
Brightlingsea
as part of the "White Formula" range of boats originally marketed by Topper International Ltd but since 2013 by Vantage Sailing. The Buzz is a double handed racing boat, with a single trapeze for the crewman. The boat has a fully battened mainsail, furling jib and an asymmetric spinnaker. There have been around 500 boats built
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Hull (watercraft)
The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of watertight and non-tight decks, major transverse and watertight (and also sometimes non-tight or longitudinal) members called bulkheads, intermediate members such as girders, stringers and webs, and minor members called ordinary transverse frames, frames, or longitudinals, depending on the structural arrangement. The uppermost continuous deck may be called the "upper deck", "weather deck", "spar deck", "main deck", or simply "deck". The particular name given depends on the context—the type of ship or boat, the arrangement, or even where it sails
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Trapeze (sailing)
In sailing, the trapeze refers to a wire that comes from a point high on the mast, usually where the shrouds are fixed, to a hook on the crew member's harness at approximately waist level. The position when extended on the trapeze is outside the hull, braced against it (or an extension of it outwards) with the soles of the feet, facing the masthead, and clipped on by a hook on the trapeze harness. This gives the crew member more leverage to keep the boat flat by allowing the crew member's centre of gravity to balance the force of the wind in the sails. An additional benefit is the ability to "walk" along the gunwale to balance the boat's trim fore and aft. This is necessary to prevent racing catamarans such as the Tornado from digging the bow into the water, also called pitchpoling, and causing a nosedive and often a spectacular capsize. Boats may have only one trapeze, such as the 420, where only the crew uses the trapeze
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Length Overall
Length overall
Length overall
(LOA, o/a, o.a. or oa) is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth[1] (for example, £2.50 per metre LOA). LOA is usually measured on the hull alone.[2] For sailing ships, this may exclude the bowsprit and other fittings added to the hull. This is how some racing boats and tall ships use the term LOA.[3] However, other sources may include bowsprits in LOA.[4][5] Confusingly, LOA has different meanings.[6][7] "Sparred length", "Total length including bowsprit", "Mooring length" and "LOA including bowsprit" are other expressions that might indicate the full length of a sailing ship. Often used to distinguish between the length of a vessel including projections (e.g
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Sharpie (boat)
Sharpies are a type of hard chined sailboat with a flat bottom, extremely shallow draft, centreboards and straight, flaring sides. They are believed to have originated in the New Haven, Connecticut region of Long Island Sound, United States
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Transom (nautical)
In naval architecture, a transom is either the surface that forms the stern of a vessel or one of the many horizontal beams that make up that surface (e.g., the "wing transom", etc.)
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International Organization For Standardization
The International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) is an international standard-setting body composed of representatives from various national standards organizations. Founded on 23 February 1947, the organization promotes worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards
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Beneteau Wizz
The Beneteau Wizz is a two-man dinghy built in 1982.[1] It was elected as boat of the year in that same year.[2] Performance and design[edit] The Wizz has a simple design, created with stability and surfing in mind. It is quick and easy to rig, and can be fitted to a car roof rack.[3] Despite being a short boat, at just 4.4 metres (14 ft), the Wizz weighs 75 kilograms (165 lb) and accommodates for two crew.[1] References[edit]^ a b " Beneteau Wizz Dinghy
Dinghy
Class Information". www.noblemarine.co.uk. Retrieved 27 January 2010.  ^ "History of Beneteau from 1884 to 1993". Retrieved 27 January 2010.  ^ "The Beneteau Wizz" (in French). www.beneteau-wizz.net. Retrieved 27 January 2010. External links[edit]www.beneteau-wizz.net (French) Details at www.noblemarine.co.ukThis article about a type of ship or boat is a stub
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Skiff
The term skiff is used for a number of essentially unrelated styles of small boat. Traditionally, these are coastal craft or rivercrafts used for leisure or fishing, and have a one-person or small crew. Sailing skiffs have developed into high performance competitive classes.Contents1 Etymology 2 Traditional boats—United Kingdom 3 Traditional boats—Americas 4 Piracy and smuggling 5 Racing sailing boats 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word is related to ship and has a complicated etymology: "skiff" comes from the Middle English
Middle English
skif, which derives from the Old French esquif, which in turn derives from the Old Italian schifo, which is itself of Germanic origin (German Schiff). "Ship" comes from the Old English "scip", which has the same Germanic predecessor
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Brightlingsea
Brightlingsea
Brightlingsea
is a coastal town and an electoral ward in the Tendring district of Essex, England. It is situated between Colchester
Colchester
and Clacton-on-Sea, at the mouth of the River Colne, on Brightlingsea Creek. At the 2011 Census, it had a population of 8,076.[1] Its traditional industries included fishery (with a renowned oyster fishery) and shipbuilding. With the decline of these industries, the town is largely a dormitory town for Colchester. Brightlingsea
Brightlingsea
is a limb of Sandwich, one of the Cinque Ports. The town retains an active ceremonial connection with the Cinque Ports, electing a Deputy from a guild of Freemen. Brightlingsea
Brightlingsea
was for many years twinned with French oyster fishery port Marennes, Charente-Maritime, but the relationship fell into disuse
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Portsmouth Yardstick
The Portsmouth Yardstick' (PY) or Portsmouth handicap scheme is a term used for a number of related systems of empirical handicapping used primarily in small sailboat racing. The handicap is applied to the time taken to sail any course, and the handicaps can be used with widely differing types sailboats. Portsmouth Numbers are updated with data from race results, normally annually
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Beam (nautical)
The beam of a ship is its width at the widest point as measured at the ship's nominal waterline. The beam is a bearing projected at right-angles from the fore and aft line, outwards from the widest part of ship
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Spinnaker
A spinnaker is a sail designed specifically for sailing off the wind from a reaching course to a downwind, i.e. with the wind 90°–180° off bow. The spinnaker fills with wind and balloons out in front of the boat when it is deployed, called flying. It is constructed of lightweight fabric, usually nylon, and is often brightly coloured. It may be optimised for a particular range of wind angles, as either a reaching or a running spinnaker, by the shaping of the panels and seams. Some types of spinnaker can be carried by the side of the boat, but still in front of the mast. This is called "flying a shy spinnaker", and is used for reaching. The spinnaker is often called a kite, or a chute (as in cruising chute) because it somewhat resembles a parachute in both construction and appearance. This should not be confused with the spinnaker chute which is a hull fitting sometimes used for launching and recovering the spinnaker
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Reg White
Reginald James White (28 October 1935 – 27 May 2010), usually Reg White, was an English boat builder, sailor, Olympic champion and world champion. He won a gold medal in the Tornado class with John Osborn at the 1976 Summer Olympics
1976 Summer Olympics
in Montreal.[1] He became world champion in the tornado class in 1976 and 1979. White died just after sailing his Brightlingsea One-Design[2][3] References[edit]^ 1976 Summer Olympics
1976 Summer Olympics
– Montreal, Canada – Sailing Archived 2008-09-17 at the Wayback Machine. – databaseOlympics.com (Retrieved on 10 November 2008) ^ "Yachts & Yachting Forum". 28 May 2010. Retrieved 28 May 2010. We are saddened to learn of the death of Olympic Tornado Gold medallist Reg White who passed away while racing his Brightlingsea One-Design last night
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3000 (dinghy)
The 3000 (formally the Laser 3000) is a racing sailing dinghy crewed by two persons with a trapeze for the crew. Launched in 1996 as the Laser 3000, the 3000 was developed from the Laser 2, using the original Frank Bethwaite-designed planing hull combined with a new designed self-draining deck by Derek Clark. Clark also re-designed the rig, using spars and sails from premium proprietary sources and replacing the symmetric spinnaker of the Laser 2
Laser 2
by a larger asymmetric spinnaker (gennaker). The gennaker is chute-launched and retrieved using a single halyard line, and is set on a retractable bowsprit. Helm balance and handling were improved using a shorter-footed mainsail with two full-width battens giving a larger roach
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Historical 10 Foot Skiffs
Historical 10 Foot Skiffs are sailing skiffs raced by members of the Australian Historical Sailing
Sailing
Skiff
Skiff
Association at Drummoyne Sailing Club on the Parramatta River
Parramatta River
in Sydney
Sydney
and at the Brisbane
Brisbane
18 Footers Sailing
Sailing
Club on the Brisbane River
Brisbane River
in Bulimba, Brisbane. Racing is held under the auspices of the AHSSA.[1] The 10 footers are beautiful boats with a strong sense of camaraderie among the crews, who are reliving the sailing events of the past.Contents1 Crew 2 Racing 3 Boats 4 Dates and venues 5 References 6 External linksCrew[edit] The 10 foot skiff is crewed by crews of 3 who attempt to keep these craft under control below large amounts of sail area
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