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Bushranger
Bushrangers were originally escaped convicts in the early years of the British settlement of Australia who had the survival skills necessary to use the Australian bush as a refuge to hide from the authorities. By the 1820s, the term "bushranger" had evolved to refer to those who abandoned social rights and privileges to take up "robbery under arms" as a way of life, using the bush as their base. Bushranging thrived during the gold rush years of the 1850s and 1860s when the likes of Ben Hall, Frank Gardiner
Frank Gardiner
and John Gilbert led notorious gangs in the country districts of New South Wales. These "Wild Colonial Boys", mostly Australian-born sons of convicts, were roughly analogous to British "highwaymen" and outlaws of the American Old West, and their crimes typically included robbing small-town banks and coach services
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57th (West Middlesex) Regiment Of Foot
The 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment
Regiment
of Foot was a regiment of line infantry in the British Army, raised in 1755
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Penal Colony
A penal colony is a settlement used to exile prisoners and separate them from the general population by placing them in a remote location, often an island or distant colonial territory. Although the term can be used to refer to a correctional facility located in a remote location it is more commonly used to refer to communities of prisoners overseen by wardens or governors having absolute authority. Historically penal colonies have often been used for penal labour in an economically underdeveloped part of a state's (usually colonial) territories, and on a far larger scale than a prison farm. In practice such penal colonies may be little more than slave communities
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John Bigge
John Thomas Bigge (8 March 1780 – 22 December 1843) was an English judge and royal commissioner.Contents1 Background 2 The Bigge Inquiry 3 Death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Bigge was born at Benton House, Northumberland, England,[1] the son of Thomas Charles Bigge, High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1771. He was educated at Newcastle Grammar School and Westminster School (1795), and in 1797 entered Christ Church, Oxford (B.A., 1801; M.A., 1804).[1] Bigge was called to the Bar in 1806 and was appointed Chief Judge of Trinidad in 1814, a post he held for the next four years.[2] The Bigge Inquiry[edit] Since 1817, Lord Bathurst had wanted to examine whether transportation was an effective deterrent to crime
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Charles Darwin
Tertiary education: University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Edinburgh Medical School
(medicine, no degree) Christ's College, Cambridge
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Joseph Lycett
Joseph Lycett (c.1774 – c.1825) [1] was a portrait and miniature painter, active in Australia. Lycett specialised in topographical views of the major towns of Australia, and some of its more dramatic landscapes.Contents1 Early life 2 Convict years2.1 Newcastle2.1.1 Collectors' Chests2.2 Sydney 2.3 Views in Australia3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Lycett was born in Staffordshire, England, where he became a botanical artist. Convict years[edit] Newcastle[edit] Lycett was convicted of forgery on 10 August 1811 and was transported to Australia, sailing aboard the General Hewitt, arriving in 1814. In May 1815 while Lycett was employed in the police office, Sydney was flooded by hundreds of skillfully forged 5 shilling bills drawn on the postmaster
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Nepean River
Nepean River
River
(Aboriginal: Yandhai[1]), is a major perennial river, located in the south-west and west of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The Nepean River
River
and its associated mouth, the Hawkesbury River, virtually encircle the metropolitan region of Sydney. The headwaters of the Nepean River
River
rise near Robertson, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) south of Sydney
Sydney
and about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) from the Tasman Sea. The river flows north in an unpopulated water catchment area into Nepean Reservoir, which supplies potable water for Sydney. North of the dam, the river forms the western edge of Sydney, flowing past the town of Camden and the city of Penrith, south of which flowing through the Nepean Gorge
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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New South Wales
New South Wales
Wales
(abbreviated as NSW) is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland
Queensland
to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia
Australia
to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
to the east. The Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2017[update], the population of New South Wales
Wales
was over 7.8 million,[9] making it Australia's most populous state
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Australian Frontier Wars
The Australian frontier wars
Australian frontier wars
were a series of conflicts that were fought between Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
and mainly British settlers that spanned a total of 146 years.[citation needed] The first fighting took place several months after the landing of the First Fleet
First Fleet
in January 1788 and the last clashes occurred as late as 1934.[citation needed] The most common estimates of fatalities in the fighting are at least 20,000 Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
and between 2,000 and 2,500 Europeans. However, recent scholarship on the frontier wars in what is now the state of Queensland
Queensland
indicates that Indigenous fatalities may have been significantly higher
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Telegraphy
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Government Of New South Wales
The Government of New South Wales, also referred to as the New South Wales Government or NSW Government, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of New South Wales. The Government of New South Wales, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1856 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia
Federation of Australia
in 1901, New South Wales
New South Wales
has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia
Australia
regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth
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Godfrey Mundy
Major-General Godfrey Charles Mundy (10 March 1804 – 10 July 1860) was a British Army officer who became Lieutenant Governor of Jersey. Military career[edit] Mundy was commissioned as a lieutenant in the British Army in 1821.[1] He took part in the Siege of Bharatpur in the Indian princely state of Baharatpur in 1825 before being made Deputy Adjutant General of the military forces in Australia in 1826.[1] He served as Under-Secretary in the War Office during the Crimean War and was appointed Lieutenant Governor of Jersey in 1857.[1] He died in office in 1860.[1] He was author of the book Our Antipodes: or, Residence and Rambles in the Australasian Colonies, with a glimpse of the Gold-Fields.[2] Family[edit] In 1848 he married Lady Louisa Catherine Georgina Herbert; they had one son, Herbert Godfrey Mundy.[3] References[edit]^ a b c d "Mundy, Godfrey Charles (1804–1860)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 2012-07-14.  ^ Godfrey Charles Mundy (1855)
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Edward Smith Hall
Edward Smith Hall (28 March 1786 – 18 September 1860)[1] was a political reformer, newspaper editor and banker in Australia. Hall was born in London, one of six sons of Smith Hall, bank manager, and his wife, Jane née Drewry. Hall grew up in Lincolnshire, had a good education and as a young man was interested in social and religious work, which probably brought him under the notice of William Wilberforce. Hall travelled in the Friends and arrived at Sydney on 10 October 1811 with a letter from Robert Peel, under-secretary of state, which asked that assistance in settling should be given Hall, and stated that he had been strongly recommended by Wilberforce and others. Hall was given a grant of land, but in October 1814 Macquarie mentioned that he had "commenced merchant at Sydney", and he was associated in this year with Simeon Lord
Simeon Lord
and others in the promotion of the New Zealand Trading Company
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The Monitor (Sydney)
The Monitor was a biweekly English language newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales and founded in 1826.[1] It is one of the earlier newspapers in the colony commencing publication twenty three years after the Sydney Gazette, the first paper to appear in 1803, and more than seventy years before the federation of Australia
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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