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Burgundy (color)
Burgundy is a dark red tending towards purple or a dark red tending towards brown. It takes its name from colour of Burgundy wine
Burgundy wine
(from the Burgundy region of France). The French refer to the colour in reference to another French wine, calling this shade of red "Bordeaux". In Quebec French, this colour is called Bourgogne IPA: [buʁɡɔɲ] ( listen)) The color burgundy is similar to other shades of dark red such as maroon, cordovan, and oxblood, but differs from each of these in subtle ways
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SRGB Color Space
sRGB (standard Red Green Blue) is an RGB color space
RGB color space
that HP and Microsoft
Microsoft
created cooperatively in 1996 to use on monitors, printers, and the Internet. It was subsequently standardized by the IEC as IEC 61966-2-1:1999.[1] It is often the "default" color space for images that contain no color space information, especially if the images' pixels are stored in 8-bit integers per color channel. sRGB uses the ITU-R BT.709 primaries, the same as in studio monitors and HDTV,[2] a transfer function (gamma curve) typical of CRTs, and a viewing environment designed to match typical home and office viewing conditions
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Blood Red
The color blood red is a dark shade of the color red meant to resemble the color of human blood (which is composed of oxygenated red erythrocytes, white leukocytes, and yellow blood plasma).[2] It is the iron in hemoglobin specifically that gives blood its red color. The actual color ranges from crimson to a dark brown-blood depending on how oxygenated the blood is, and may have a slightly orange hue. Deoxygenated blood, which circulates closer to the body's surface and which is therefore generally more likely to be seen than oxygenated blood, issues from bodily veins in a dark red state, but quickly oxygenates upon exposure to air, turning a brighter shade of red
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Hair
Hair
Hair
is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis. Hair
Hair
is one of the defining characteristics of mammals. The human body, apart from areas of glabrous skin, is covered in follicles which produce thick terminal and fine vellus hair
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Black
Black
Black
is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light. It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white (its opposite) and gray.[1] It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.[2] Black
Black
ink is the most common color used for printing books, newspapers and documents, because it has the highest contrast with white paper and is the easiest to read. For the same reason, black text on a white screen is the most common format used on computer screens.[3] In color printing it is used along with the subtractive primaries cyan, yellow, and magenta, in order to help produce the darkest shades. Black
Black
and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the "Dark Ages" versus Age of Enlightenment
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Yellow
Yellow
Yellow
is the color between green and orange on the spectrum of visible light. It is evoked by light with a dominant wavelength of roughly 570–590 nm. It is a primary color in subtractive color systems, used in painting or color printing. In the RGB color model, used to create colors on television and computer screens, yellow is a secondary color made by combining red and green at equal intensity. Carotenoids
Carotenoids
give the characteristic yellow color to autumn leaves, corn, canaries, daffodils, and lemons, as well as egg yolks, buttercups, and bananas. They absorb light energy and protect plants from photodamage.[3] Sunlight
Sunlight
has a slight yellowish hue, due to the surface temperature of the sun. Because it was widely available, yellow ochre pigment was one of the first colors used in art; the Lascaux
Lascaux
cave in France has a painting of a yellow horse 17,000 years old
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Cyan
Cyan
Cyan
(/ˈsaɪ.ən/[4] or /ˈsaɪ.æn/[5]) is a greenish-blue color.[6][7] It is evoked by light with a predominant wavelength of between 490–520 nm, between the wavelengths of blue and green.[8] In the subtractive color system, or CMYK
CMYK
(subtractive), which can be overlaid to produce all colors in paint and color printing, cyan is one of the primary colors, along with magenta, yellow, and black. In the additive color system, or RGB (additive) color model, used to create all the colors on a computer or television display, cyan is made by mixing equal amounts of green and blue light. Cyan
Cyan
is the complement of red; it can be made by the removal of red from white light. Mixing red light and cyan light at the right intensity will make white light. The web color cyan is synonymous with aqua
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CMYK Color Model
The CMYK color model
CMYK color model
(process color, four color) is a subtractive color model, used in color printing, and is also used to describe the printing process itself. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). The reason for black ink being referred to as key is because in four-color printing, cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed, or aligned, with the key of the black key plate. Some sources suggest that the "K" in CMYK comes from the last letter in "black" and was chosen because B already means blue.[1][2] However, some people disagree with this because there is no blue in the primary CMYK colors; it is made with cyan and magenta. Some sources claim this explanation, although useful as a mnemonic, is incorrect, that K comes only from "Key" because black is often used as outline and printed first
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Burgundians
The Burgundians
Burgundians
(Latin: Burgundiōnes, Burgundī; Old Norse: Burgundar; Old English: Burgendas; Greek: Βούργουνδοι) were a large East Germanic or Vandal
Vandal
tribe, or group of tribes, who lived in the area of modern Poland
Poland
in the time of the Roman Empire. In the late Roman period, as the empire came under pressure from many such "barbarian" peoples, a powerful group of Burgundians
Burgundians
and other Vandalic
Vandalic
tribes moved westwards towards the Roman frontiers along the Rhine
Rhine
Valley, making them neighbors of the Franks
Franks
who formed their kingdoms to the north, and the Suebic Alemanni
Alemanni
who were settling to their south, also near the Rhine
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Bordeaux
www.bordeaux.frUNESCO World Heritage SiteOfficial name Bordeaux, Port of the MoonCriteria Cultural: ii, ivReference 1256Inscription 2007 (31st Session)Area 1,731 haBuffer zone 11,974 ha1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Bordeaux
Bordeaux
(French pronunciation: ​[bɔʁdo]; Gascon Occitan: Bordèu) is a port city on the Garonne
Garonne
River in the Gironde
Gironde
department in southwestern France. The municipality (commune) of Bordeaux
Bordeaux
proper has a population of 246,586 (2014)
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Cosmetology
Cosmetology (from Greek κοσμητικός, kosmētikos, "beautifying";[1] and -λογία, -logia) is the study and application of beauty treatment
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Gevrey-Chambertin
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Gevrey- Chambertin
Chambertin
is a commune in the Côte-d'Or
Côte-d'Or
department of France in the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté
region in eastern France. It lies 15 km South of Dijon. This touristy, winemaking village is situated on the Route des Grands Crus
Route des Grands Crus
in the Côte de Nuits
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Green
Green
Green
is the color between blue and yellow on the visible spectrum. It is evoked by light which has a dominant wavelength of roughly 495–570 nm. In subtractive color systems, used in painting and color printing, it is created by a combination of yellow and blue, or yellow and cyan; in the RGB color model, used on television and computer screens, it is one of the additive primary colors, along with red and blue, which are mixed in different combinations to create all other colors. By far the largest contributor to green in nature is chlorophyll, the chemical by which plants photosynthesize and convert sunlight into chemical energy
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Burgundy Wine
Burgundy
Burgundy
wine (French: Bourgogne or vin de Bourgogne) is wine made in the Burgundy
Burgundy
region in eastern France,[1] in the valleys and slopes west of the Saône, a tributary of the Rhône. The most famous wines produced here—those commonly referred to as "Burgundies"—are dry red wines made from Pinot noir
Pinot noir
grapes and white wines made from Chardonnay
Chardonnay
grapes. Red and white wines are also made from other grape varieties, such as Gamay
Gamay
and Aligoté, respectively. Small amounts of rosé and sparkling wines are also produced in the region
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