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Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park
Bukit Barisan
Bukit Barisan
Selatan National Park is a national park in Sumatra, Indonesia. The park located along the Bukit Barisan
Bukit Barisan
mountain range, has a total area of 3,568 km2, and spans three provinces: Lampung, Bengkulu, and South Sumatra. Together with Gunung Leuser and Kerinci Seblat national parks it forms a World Heritage Site, Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra.[1]Contents1 Flora and fauna 2 Conservation and threats 3 See also 4 ReferencesFlora and fauna[edit] The national park stretching along the Bukit Barisan
Bukit Barisan
mountain range is in average only 45 km wide but 350 km long
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Amorphophallus Titanum
Amorphophallus
Amorphophallus
titanum, also known as the titan arum, is a flowering plant with the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world. The titan arum's inflorescence is not as large as that of the talipot palm, Corypha umbraculifera, but the inflorescence of the talipot palm is branched rather than unbranched. Due to its odor, which is like the smell of a rotting corpse or carcass, the titan arum is characterized as a carrion flower, and is also known as the corpse flower, or corpse plant (Indonesian: bunga bangkai – bunga means flower, while bangkai can be translated as corpse, cadaver, or carrion)
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Sonneratia
Sonneratia
Sonneratia
is a genus of plants in the family Lythraceae. Formerly the Sonneratia
Sonneratia
were placed in a family called Sonneratiaceae which included both the Sonneratia
Sonneratia
and the Duabanga, but these two are now placed in their own monotypic subfamilies of the family Lythraceae. The genus was also named Blatti by James Edward Smith, but Sonneratia had botanical nomenclature priority
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Pandanus
Pandanus
Pandanus
is a genus of monocots with some 750 accepted species.[2] They are palm-like, dioecious trees and shrubs native to the Old World tropics and subtropics. Common names include pandan[3] (/ˈpændən/),[4] screw palm,[3] and screw pine.[3] They are classified in the order Pandanales, family Pandanaceae.[5][6]Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Cultivation and uses 4 Selected species 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksDescription[edit]Aerial, prop roots[7]Often called pandanus palms, these plants are not closely related to palm trees
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Shorea
See List of Shorea species
List of Shorea species
for complete taxonomy to species level. Shorea
Shorea
is a genus of about 196 species of mainly rainforest trees in the family Dipterocarpaceae. The genus is named after Sir John Shore, the Governor-General of the British East India
India
Company, 1793–1798. They are native to southeast Asia, from Northern India
India
to Malaysia, Indonesia
Indonesia
and the Philippines. In west Malesia
Malesia
and the Philippines this genus dominates the skyline of the tropical forests. The tallest documented tropical angiosperm is an 88.3-metre-tall Shorea
Shorea
faguetiana in the Tawau Hills National Park, in Sabah
Sabah
on the island of Borneo, and in that park at least five other species of the genus have been measured to be over 80 m tall: S. argentifolia, S
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Dipterocarpus
See text Dipterocarpus
Dipterocarpus
is a genus of flowering plants and the type genus of family Dipterocarpaceae. Dipterocarpus
Dipterocarpus
are the third largest and most diverse genus among Dipterocarpaceae. They are well known for timber, but less acknowledged for its use in traditional herbal medicine.[1] The genus has about 70 species,[2] occurring in Southeast Asia. It is an important component of dipterocarp forests
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Amorphophallus
Amorphophallus
Amorphophallus
(from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
amorphos, "without form, misshapen" + phallos, "penis", referring to the shape of the prominent spadix), commonly known as Zaminkand, is a large genus of some 200 tropical and subtropical tuberous herbaceous plants from the Arum
Arum
family (Araceae), native to Asia, Africa, Australia
Australia
and various oceanic islands.[1][2] A few species are edible as "famine foods" after careful preparation to remove irritating chemicals.[3]Contents1 History 2 Distribution 3 Description3.1 Individual species4 Species 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The oldest systematic record of the plants was in 1692, when Van Rheede tot Drakenstein published descriptions of two plants
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Grammatophyllum Speciosum
Grammatophyllum
Grammatophyllum
speciosum, also called giant orchid, tiger orchid, sugar cane orchid or queen of the orchids, is a species of orchid native to Indonesia. It is listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's tallest orchid, with specimens recorded up to 7.62 metres (25 ft) in height.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Common names 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Ecology 5 ReferencesDescription[edit]A relatively small Grammatophyllum
Grammatophyllum
speciousum in a tall clay Chinese orchid pot for Oncidiums.It is an epiphytic and occasionally a lithophytic plant, forming spectacular root bundles. Its cylindric pseudobulbs can grow to a length of 2.5 m. It can grow to gigantic clusters weighing from several hundred kilograms to more than one ton.[4] Each raceme can grow to a height of 3m, bearing up to eighty flowers, each 10 cm wide. The flowers are yellow colored with maroon or dark red spots
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Anisoptera Curtisii
Anisoptera curtisii
Anisoptera curtisii
is a species of plant in the Dipterocarpaceae family. It is found in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand.[1] References[edit]^ a b Ashton, P. (1998). "Anisoptera curtisii". IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 7 February 2014. Taxon identifiersWd: Q2850146 ARKive: anisoptera-curtisii GBIF: 5668965 GRIN: 405639 iNaturalist: 189278 IPNI: 320548-1 IUCN: 33005 Plant
Plant
List: kew-2640340 Tropicos: 100289353This Dipterocarpaceae
Dipterocarpaceae
article is a stub
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Malayan Tapir
Acrocodia indicaThe Malayan tapir
Malayan tapir
(Tapirus indicus), also called the Asian tapir, is the largest of the five species of tapir and the only one native to Asia.[3] The scientific name refers to the East Indies, the species' natural habitat. In the Malay language, the tapir is commonly referred to as cipan, tenuk or badak tampung.[4]Contents1 General appearance and characteristics1.1 Visual 1.2 Brevetianus variation2 Lifecycle 3 Behaviour 4 Habitat, predation, and vulnerability 5 Notes 6 External linksGeneral appearance and characteristics[edit] The animal is easily identified by its markings, most notably the light-colored patch that extends from its shoulders to its rear end. The rest of its hair is black, except for the tips of its ears, which, as with other tapirs, are rimmed with white
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Sumatran Surili
The Sumatran surili (Presbytis melalophos) is a species of primate in the family Cercopithecidae. It is endemic to Sumatra in Indonesia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.[2] References[edit]^ Groves, C.P. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 171–172. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.  ^ a b Nijman, V. & Manullang, B. (2008). "Presbytis melalophos". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T18129A7666452. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T18129A7666452.en
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Sun Bear
Ursus malayanus Raffles, 1821The sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) is a bear species occurring in tropical forest habitats of Southeast Asia. It is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
as the large-scale deforestation that has occurred throughout Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
over the past three decades has dramatically reduced suitable habitat for the sun bear
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Lesser Mouse-deer
The lesser mouse-deer or kanchil ( Tragulus
Tragulus
kanchil), also known as the lesser Malay chevrotain, is a species of even-toed ungulate in the family Tragulidae
Tragulidae
.Contents1 Distribution 2 Description 3 Etymology 4 Folktale 5 ReferencesDistribution[edit] The lesser mouse-deer is found widely across Southeast Asia in Indochina, Burma
Burma
(isthmus of Kra), Brunei, Cambodia, China
China
(S Yunnan), Indonesia
Indonesia
(Kalimantan, Sumatra
Sumatra
and many small islands), Laos, Malaysia (peninsular Malaya, Sarawak and many small islands), Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Description[edit] It is the smallest known hoofed mammal, its mature size being as little as 45 cm (18 inches) and 2 kg (4.4 lb)
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Dutch East Indies
The Dutch East Indies
East Indies
(or Netherlands
Netherlands
East-Indies; Dutch: Nederlands(ch)-Indië; Indonesian: Hindia Belanda) was a Dutch colony consisting of what is now Indonesia. It was formed from the nationalised colonies of the Dutch East India Company, which came under the administration of the Dutch government in 1800. During the 19th century, the Dutch possessions and hegemony were expanded, reaching their greatest territorial extent in the early 20th century. This colony was one of the most valuable European colonies under the Dutch Empire's rule,[4] and contributed to Dutch global prominence in spice and cash crop trade in the 19th to early 20th century.[5] The colonial social order was based on rigid racial and social structures with a Dutch elite living separate from but linked to their native subjects.[6] The term Indonesia
Indonesia
came into use for the geographical location after 1880
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