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Building Material
Building
Building
material is any material which is used for construction purposes. Many naturally occurring substances, such as clay, rocks, sand, and wood, even twigs and leaves, have been used to construct buildings. Apart from naturally occurring materials, many man-made products are in use, some more and some less synthetic. The manufacturing of building materials is an established industry in many countries and the use of these materials is typically segmented into specific specialty trades, such as carpentry, insulation, plumbing, and roofing work
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Household Hardware
Household hardware (or simply, hardware) is equipment that can be touched or held by hand such as nuts, screws, washers, keys, locks, hinges, latches, handles, wire, chains, belts, plumbing supplies, electrical supplies, tools, utensils, cutlery and machine parts. Household hardware is typically sold in hardware stores. See also[edit]Builders hardwarev t eHand toolsSawhorse Toolbox WorkbenchAdjustable spanner Antique tools Basin wrench Block plane Brace Bradawl Breaker bar Card scraper Cat's paw Caulking
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Beaver
C. fiber – Eurasian beaver C. canadensis – North American
North American
beaver †C. californicusDistribution of C. fiber.Distribution of C. canadensis.Fossils of C. californicusThe beaver (genus Castor) is a large, primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic rodent. Castor includes two extant species, the North American
North American
beaver (Castor canadensis) (native to North America) and Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) (Eurasia).[1] Beavers
Beavers
are known for building dams, canals, and lodges (homes). They are the second-largest rodent in the world (after the capybara). Their colonies create one or more dams to provide still, deep water to protect against predators, and to float food and building material. The North American beaver
North American beaver
population was once more than 60 million, but as of 1988 was 6–12 million
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Ecological Economics
Ecological economics
Ecological economics
(also called eco-economics, ecolonomy or bioeconomics of Georgescu-Roegen) is both a transdisciplinary and an interdisciplinary field of academic research addressing the interdependence and coevolution of human economies and natural ecosystems, both intertemporally and spatially.[1] By treating the economy as a subsystem of Earth's larger ecosystem, and by emphasizing the preservation of natural capital, the field of ecological economics is differentiated from environmental economics, which is the mainstream economic analysis of the environment.[2] One survey of
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Sustainable Development
Sustainable development
Sustainable development
isthe organizing principle for meeting human development goals while at the same time sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services upon which the economy and society depend. The desired result is a state of society where living conditions and resource use continue to meet human needs without undermining the integrity and stability of the natural system. Sustainable development
Sustainable development
can be classified as development that meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations.While the modern concept of sustainable development is derived mostly from the 1987 Brundtland Report, it is also rooted in earlier ideas about sustainable forest management and twentieth century environmental concerns
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Embodied Energy
Embodied or embodiment may refer to: in psychology, linguistics and philosophy, Embodied cognition
Embodied cognition
(or the embodied mind thesis), a position in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind emphasizing the role that the body plays in shaping the mind Embodied imagination, a therapeutic and creative form of working with dreams and memoriesin computer science, robotics and artificial intelligence,Embodied embedded cognition, a position in cognitive science stating that intelligent behavior emerges from the interplay between brain, body and world Embodied agent, in artificial
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Fair Trade
Fair trade
Fair trade
is a social movement whose stated goal is to help producers in developing countries achieve better trading conditions and to promote sustainable farming. Members of the movement advocate the payment of higher prices to exporters, as well as improved social and environmental standards. The movement focuses in particular on commodities, or products which are typically exported from developing countries to developed countries, but also consumed in domestic markets (e.g. Brazil, India
India
and Bangladesh) most notably handicrafts, coffee, cocoa, wine, sugar, fresh fruit, chocolate, flowers and gold.[1][2] The movement seeks to promote greater equity in international trading partnerships through dialogue, transparency, and respect
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Labor Rights
Labor rights or workers' rights are a group of legal rights and claimed human rights having to do with labor relations between workers and their employers, usually obtained under labor and employment law. In general, these rights' debates have to do with negotiating workers' pay, benefits, and safe working conditions. One of the most central of these rights is the right to unionize. Unions take advantage of collective bargaining and industrial action to increase their members' wages and otherwise change their working situation. Labor rights can also take in the form of worker's control and worker's self management in which workers have a democratic voice in decision and policy making. The labor movement initially focused on this "right to unionize", but attention has shifted elsewhere. Critics of the labor rights movement claim that regulation promoted by labor rights activists may limit opportunities for work
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Mohave People
Mohave or Mojave (Mojave: 'Aha Makhav) are a Native American people indigenous to the Colorado River
Colorado River
in the Mojave Desert. The Fort Mojave Indian Reservation includes territory within the borders of California, Arizona, and Nevada. The Colorado River
Colorado River
Indian Reservation includes parts of California
California
and Arizona
Arizona
and is shared by members of the Chemehuevi, Hopi, and Navajo peoples. The original Colorado River
Colorado River
and Fort Mojave reservations were established in 1865 and 1870, respectively
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Branches
A branch (UK: /ˈbrɑːntʃ/ or UK: /ˈbræntʃ/, US: /ˈbræntʃ/) or tree branch (sometimes referred to in botany as a ramus) is a woody structural member connected to but not part of the central trunk of a tree (or sometimes a shrub). Large branches are known as boughs and small branches are known as twigs.[1] Due to a broad range of species of trees, branches and twigs can be found in many different shapes and sizes. While branches can be nearly horizontal, vertical, or diagonal, the majority of trees have upwardly diagonal branches. The term "twig" often refers to a terminus, while "bough" refers only to branches coming directly from the trunk.Contents1 Words1.1 Specific terms 1.2 History and etymology2 See also 3 ReferencesWords[edit] Because of the enormous quantity of branches in the world, there are a variety of names in English alone for them
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Pygmy Peoples
A pygmy is a member of an ethnic group whose average height is unusually short; anthropologists define pygmy as a member of any group where adult men are on average less than 150 cm (4 feet 11 inches) tall.[1] A member of a slightly taller group is termed "pygmoid".[2] The term is most associated with peoples of Central Africa, such as the Aka, Efé and Mbuti.[3] If the term pygmy is defined as a group's men having an average height below 1.55 meters (5 feet 1 inch), then there are also pygmies in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, India,[4] Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Bolivia, and Brazil,[5] including some Negritos of Southeast Asia.[citation needed]Contents1 Etymology 2 Origins 3 Africa3.1 Groups 3.2 Origins 3.3 Abuse by non-Pygmies3.3.1 Reported genocide in Rwanda 3.3.2 Reported geno
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Wikiup
A wigwam, wickiup or wetu is a domed dwelling formerly used by certain Native American and First Nations
First Nations
tribes, and still used for ceremonial purposes. The term wickiup is generally used to label these kinds of dwellings in the Southwestern United States
Southwestern United States
and Western United States, while wigwam is usually applied to these structures in the Northeastern United States
Northeastern United States
and Canada. Wetu is the Wampanoag
Wampanoag
term for a wigwam dwelling
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Carbon Footprint
A carbon footprint is historically defined as the total emissions caused by an individual, event, organisation, or product, expressed as carbon dioxide equivalent.[1] In most cases, the total carbon footprint cannot be exactly calculated because of inadequate knowledge of and data about the complex interactions between contributing processes, especially which including the influence on natural processes storing or releasing carbon dioxide. For this reason, Wright, Kemp, and Williams, have suggested to define the carbon footprint as:A measure of the total amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions of a defined population, system or activity, considering all relevant sources, sinks and storage within the spatial and temporal boundary of the population, system or activity of interest
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Feces
Feces
Feces
(or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of the food that could not be digested in the small intestine. Bacteria in the large intestine further break down the material.[1][2] Feces
Feces
contain a relatively small amount of metabolic waste products such as bacterially altered bilirubin, and the dead epithelial cells from the lining of the gut.[1] Feces
Feces
are discharged through the anus or cloaca during a process called defecation. Feces
Feces
can be used as fertilizer or soil conditioner in agriculture. It can also be burned and used as a fuel source or dried and used as a construction material. Some medicinal uses have been found. In the case of human feces, fecal transplants or fecal bacteriotherapy are in use
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Cow
Cattle—colloquially cows[note 1]—are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos
Bos
taurus. Cattle
Cattle
are commonly raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (oxen or bullocks that pull carts, plows and other implements). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel
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Inuit
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Inuit
Inuit
(pronounced /ˈɪnju.ɪt/; Inuktitut: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, "the people"[7]) are a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic
Arctic

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