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Buick
Buick
Buick
(/ˈbjuːɪk/), formally the Buick
Buick
Motor Division, is an upscale automobile brand of the American manufacturer General Motors
General Motors
(GM). It has the distinction of being the oldest active American marque of automobile, and was the company that established General Motors
General Motors
in 1908.[2] Before the establishment of General Motors, GM founder William C. Durant
William C. Durant
had served as Buick's general manager and major investor
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Tiller
A tiller or till is a lever attached to a rudder post (American terminology) or rudder stock (English terminology) of a boat that provides leverage in the form of torque for the helmsman to turn the rudder. The tiller can be used by the helmsman directly pulling or pushing it, but it may also be moved remotely using tiller lines or a ship's wheel. In the early 1500s the tiller was also referred to as the steering stick.[citation needed] Rapid or excessive movement of the tiller results in an increase in drag and will result in braking or slowing the boat. In steering a boat, the tiller is always moved in the direction opposite of which the bow of the boat is to move. If the tiller is moved to port side (left), the bow will turn to starboard (right). If the tiller is moved to starboard (right), the bow will turn port (left)
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Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports
is an American magazine published since 1930 by Consumers Union, a nonprofit organization dedicated to unbiased product testing, consumer-oriented research, public education, and advocacy. Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports
publishes reviews and comparisons of consumer products and services based on reporting and results from its in-house testing laboratory and survey research center. The magazine accepts no advertising, pays for all the products it tests, and as a nonprofit organization has no shareholders. It also publishes general and targeted product/service buying guides
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D. Napier & Son
D. Napier & Son Limited was a British engineering company best known for its luxury motor cars in the Edwardian era
Edwardian era
and for its aero engines throughout the early to mid-20th century. Napier was founded as a precision engineering company in 1808 and for nearly a century produced machinery for the financial, print and munitions industries. In the early 20th century it moved for a time into internal combustion engines and road vehicles before turning to aero engines. Its powerful Lion dominated the UK market in the 1920s and the Second World War era Sabre produced 3500 hp (2,600 kW) in its later versions. Many world speed records on land and water, as well as the Hawker Typhoon
Hawker Typhoon
and Tempest fighter planes, were powered by Napier engines. During the Second World War the company was taken over by English Electric, and engine manufacture eventually ceased
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Durant-Dort Carriage Company
A carriage is a wheeled vehicle for people, usually horse-drawn; litters (palanquins) and sedan chairs are excluded, since they are wheelless vehicles. The carriage is especially designed for private passenger use, though some are also used to transport goods. A public passenger vehicle would not usually be called a carriage – terms for such include stagecoach, charabanc and omnibus. It may be light, smart and fast or heavy, large and comfortable or luxurious. Carriages normally have suspension using leaf springs, elliptical springs (in the 19th century) or leather strapping
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Boxer Engine
A flat engine is an internal combustion engine with horizontally-opposed cylinders. Typically, the layout has cylinders arranged in two banks on either side of a single crankshaft and is otherwise known as the boxer, or horizontally-opposed engine. The concept was patented in 1896 by engineer Karl Benz, who called it the "contra engine."[1][2] A boxer engine should not be confused with the opposed-piston engine, in which each cylinder has two pistons but no cylinder head. Also, if a straight engine is canted 90 degrees into the horizontal plane, it may be thought of as a "flat engine". Horizontal inline engines are quite common in industrial applications such as underfloor mounting for buses. True boxers have each crankpin controlling only one piston/cylinder while the 180° engines, which superficially appear very similar, share crankpins
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Flat-twin
A flat-twin is a two-cylinder internal combustion engine with the cylinders on opposite sides of the crankshaft. It is a flat engine with two cylinders. Used in motorcycles for more than a century, flat-twins have also been used in automobiles, light aircraft, stationary powerplants, and household appliances. Early flat-twin motorcycles' engines were mounted with the cylinders in line with the frame. This caused uneven cooling of the cylinders and required the motorcycle to have a long wheelbase. Later flat-twin motorcycles' engines were mounted with their cylinders across the frame for better air cooling and a shorter wheelbase
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Benjamin Briscoe
Bela (son) Beker (son) Ashbel (son) Gera (son) Naaman (son) Ehi (son) Rosh (son) Muppim (son) Huppim (son) Ard (son) [1]Parents Jacob
Jacob
(father) Rachel
Rachel
(mother)RelativesReuben (half brother) Simeon (half brother) Levi
Levi
(half brother) Judah (half brother) Issachar (half brother) Zebulun (half brother) Dan (half brother) Naphtali (half brother) Gad (half brother) Asher
Asher
(half brother) Joseph
Joseph
(brother) Dinah
Dinah
(half sister) Benjamin
Benjamin
(Hebrew: בנימין, "Son of the right side") was the last-born of Jacob's thirteen children (12 sons and 1 daughter), and the second and last son of Rachel
Rachel
in Jewish, Christian
Christian
and Islamic tradition
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Vanderbilt Cup
The Vanderbilt Cup
Vanderbilt Cup
was the first major trophy in American auto racing.Contents1 History 2 Trophies 3 Race winners 4 Revival trophy 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] An international event, it was founded by William Kissam Vanderbilt II in 1904 and first held on October 8 on a course set out in Nassau County on Long Island, New York.[1] The announcement that the race was to be held caused considerable controversy in New York, bringing a flood of legal actions in an attempt to stop the race. The politicians soon jumped in, holding public hearings on the issue. Vanderbilt prevailed and the inaugural race was run over a 30.24 miles (48.7 km) course of winding dirt roads through the Nassau County area. Vanderbilt put up a large cash prize hoping to encourage American manufacturers to get into racing, a sport already well organized in Europe that was yielding many factory improvements to motor vehicle technology
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Studebaker
Studebaker
Studebaker
/ˈstjuːdəbeɪkər/ STEW-də-bay-kər) was an American wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868[1] under the name of the Studebaker
Studebaker
Brothers Manufacturing Company, the company was originally a producer of wagons for farmers, miners, and the military. Studebaker
Studebaker
entered the automotive business in 1902 with electric vehicles and in 1904 with gasoline vehicles, all sold under the name " Studebaker
Studebaker
Automobile
Automobile
Company". Until 1911, its automotive division operated in partnership with the Garford Company of Elyria, Ohio, and after 1909 with the E-M-F Company
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Western Hemisphere
The Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
is a geographical term[1][2] for the half of Earth
Earth
which lies west of the prime meridian (which crosses Greenwich, London, United Kingdom) and east of the antimeridian
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Autocar Company
The Autocar Company
Autocar Company
is an American specialist manufacturer of severe-duty, Cab Over Engine vocational trucks, based in Hagerstown, Indiana. Started in 1897[1] in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles, and trucks from 1899, Autocar is the oldest surviving motor vehicle brand in the Western Hemisphere. The last cars were produced in 1911 and the company continued as a maker of severe-duty trucks. In 1953 Autocar was taken over by the White Motor Company
White Motor Company
which made Autocar their top-of-the-line brand. White was taken over in turn by Volvo Trucks
Volvo Trucks
in 1981 with Autocar continuing as a division. In 2001, Autocar was acquired by GVW Group, LLC, which revived Autocar as an independent company
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Torque
Torque, moment, or moment of force is rotational force.[1] Just as a linear force is a push or a pull, a torque can be thought of as a twist to an object. In three dimensions, the torque is a pseudovector; for point particles, it is given by the cross product of the position vector (distance vector) and the force vector. The symbol for torque is typically τ displaystyle tau , the lowercase Greek letter tau. When it is called moment of force, it is commonly denoted by M. The magnitude of torque of a rigid body depends on three quantities: the force applied, the lever arm vector[2] connecting the origin to the point of force application, and the angle between the force and lever arm vectors
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Automobile Racing
Auto racing
Auto racing
(also known as car racing, motor racing,[1] or automobile racing) is a motorsport involving the racing of automobiles for competition. Almost as soon as automobiles had been invented, races of various sorts were organised, with the first recorded as early as 1867. Many of the earliest events were effectively reliability trials, aimed at proving these new machines were a practical mode of transport, but soon became an important way for competing makers to demonstrate their machines
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Brand
A brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer.[2][3] Brands are used in business, marketing, and advertising. Name brands are sometimes distinguished from generic or store brands. The practice of branding is thought to have begun with the ancient Egyptians who were known to have engaged in livestock branding as early as 2,700 BC.[4] Branding was used to differentiate one person’s cattle from another's by means of a distinctive symbol burned into the animal’s skin with a hot branding iron. If a person would steal the animals, anyone could detect the symbol and deduce the actual owner
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