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Bufflehead
Anas albeola Linnaeus, 1758 Charitonetta albeolaThe bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) is a small sea duck of the genus Bucephala, the goldeneyes. This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 as Anas albeola.[2] The genus name is derived from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
boukephalos, "bullheaded", from bous, "bull " and kephale, "head", a reference to the oddly bulbous head shape of the species
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Golden Eagle
The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes. Immature eagles of this species typically have white on the tail and often have white markings on the wings. Golden eagles use their agility and speed combined with powerful feet and massive, sharp talons to snatch up a variety of prey, mainly hares, rabbits, marmots and other ground squirrels.[2] Golden eagles maintain home ranges or territories that may be as large as 200 km2 (77 sq mi). They build large nests in cliffs and other high places to which they may return for several breeding years. Most breeding activities take place in the spring; they are monogamous and may remain together for several years or possibly for life
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Northern Flicker
The northern flicker ( Colaptes
Colaptes
auratus) is a medium-sized bird of the woodpecker family. It is native to most of North America, parts of Central America, Cuba, and the Cayman Islands, and is one of the few woodpecker species that migrate. Over 100 common names for the northern flicker are known, including yellowhammer (not to be confused with the Eurasian yellowhammer), clape, gaffer woodpecker, harry-wicket, heigh-ho, wake-up, walk-up, wick-up, yarrup, and gawker bird. Many of these names derive from attempts to imitate some of its calls.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description2.1 Call and flight3 Behavior3.1 Diet4 Habitat 5 Lifespan5.1 Reproduction 5.2 Wintering and migration6 References 7 External linksTaxonomy[edit] The northern flicker is part of the genus Colaptes, which encompasses 12 New World
New World
woodpeckers
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Mountain Bluebird
The mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a medium-sized bird weighing about 30 g (1.1 oz) with a length from 16–20 cm (6.3–7.9 in). They have light underbellies and black eyes. Adult males have thin bills and are bright turquoise-blue and somewhat lighter underneath. Adult females have duller blue wings and tail, grey breast, grey crown, throat and back. In fresh fall plumage, the female's throat and breast are tinged with red-orange, brownish near the flank contrasting with white tail underparts. Their call is a thin 'few'; while their song is warbled high 'chur chur'. It is the state bird of Idaho
Idaho
and Nevada. It is an omnivore and it can live 6 to 10 years in the wild. It eats spiders, grasshoppers, flies and other insects, and small fruits
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Tree Swallow
Iridoprocne bicolorThe tree swallow ( Tachycineta
Tachycineta
bicolor) is a migratory passerine bird that breeds in North America
North America
and winters in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean
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European Starling
The common starling ( Sturnus
Sturnus
vulgaris), also known as the European starling, or in the British Isles just the starling, is a medium-sized passerine bird in the starling family, Sturnidae. It is about 20 cm (8 in) long and has glossy black plumage with a metallic sheen, which is speckled with white at some times of year. The legs are pink and the bill is black in winter and yellow in summer; young birds have browner plumage than the adults. It is a noisy bird, especially in communal roosts and other gregarious situations, with an unmusical but varied song
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Weasel
A weasel /ˈwiːzəl/ is a mammal of the genus Mustela of the family Mustelidae. The genus Mustela includes the least weasels, polecats, stoats, ferrets and minks. Members of this genus are small, active predators, with long and slender bodies and short legs. The family Mustelidae
Mustelidae
(which also includes badgers, otters, and wolverines) is often referred to as the "weasel family". In the UK, the term "weasel" usually refers to the smallest species, the least weasel (M. nivalis).[1] Weasels vary in length from 173 to 217 mm (6.8 to 8.5 in),[2] females being smaller than the males, and usually have red or brown upper coats and white bellies; some populations of some species moult to a wholly white coat in winter
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Mink
Neovison
Neovison
vison † Neovison
Neovison
macrodon Mustela
Mustela
lutreolaEuropean mink ( Mustela
Mustela
lutreola) Mink
Mink
are dark-colored, semiaquatic, carnivorous mammals of the genera Neovison
Neovison
and Mustela, and part of the family Mustelidae
Mustelidae
which also includes weasels, otters and ferrets. There are two extant species referred to as "mink": the American mink
American mink
and the European mink
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Peregrine Falcon
17–19, see textGlobal range of F. peregrinus      Breeding summer visitor     Breeding resident     Winter visitor     Passage visitorSynonymsFalco atriceps Hume Falco kreyenborgi Kleinschmidt, 1929Falco pelegrinoides madens Ripley & Watson, 1963 Rhynchodon peregrinus (Tunstall, 1771) and see textThe peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), also known as the peregrine,[2] and historically as the duck hawk in North America,[3] is a widespread bird of prey in the family Falconidae. A large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head
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Snowy Owl
Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca (Linnaeus, 1758)The snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large, white owl of the typical owl family. Snowy owls are native to Arctic
Arctic
regions in North America and Eurasia. Males are almost all white, while females have more flecks of black plumage. Juvenile snowy owls have black feathers until they turn white. The snowy owl is a ground nester that primarily hunts rodents and waterfowl, and opportunistically eats carrion. Most owls sleep during the day and hunt at night, but the snowy owl is active during the day, especially in the summertime.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Behaviour4.1 Breeding 4.2 Hunting and diet5 Natural threats 6 Hybrids 7 Conservation 8 Popular culture 9 Gallery 10 References 11 External linksTaxonomy[edit]Young owl on the tundra at Barrow, Alaska
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Bald Eagle
H. l. leucocephalus – Southern bald eagle H. l. washingtoniensis – Northern bald eagle Bald
Bald
eagle range  Breeding resident   Breeding summer visitor   Winter visitor   On migration only Star: accidental recordsSynonymsFalco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, from Greek ἅλς, hals "sea", αἰετός aietos "eagle", λευκός, leukos "white", κεφαλή, kephalē "head") is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known subspecies and forms a species pair with the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). Its range includes most of Canada
Canada
and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico
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Red-tailed Hawk
Buteo
Buteo
borealis Buteo
Buteo
broealis (lapsus) Falco borealis Gmelin Falco harlani AudubonThe red-tailed hawk ( Buteo
Buteo
jamaicensis) is a bird of prey that breeds throughout most of North America, from the interior of Alaska
Alaska
and northern Canada
Canada
to as far south as Panama
Panama
and the West Indies. It is one of the most common members within the genus of Buteo
Buteo
in North America or worldwide.[2] The red-tailed hawk is one of three species colloquially known in the United States
United States
as the "chickenhawk," though it rarely preys on standard-sized chickens.[3] The bird is sometimes also referred to as the red-tail for short, when the meaning is clear in context
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Least Concern
A least concern (LC) species is a species which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) as evaluated but not qualified for any other category. As such they do not qualify as threatened, near threatened, or (before 2001) conservation dependent. Species
Species
cannot be assigned the Least Concern category unless they have had their population status evaluated. That is, adequate information is needed to make a direct, or indirect, assessment of its risk of extinction based on its distribution or population status. Since 2001 the category has had the abbreviation "LC", following the IUCN 2001 Categories & Criteria (version 3.1).[1] However, around 20% of least concern taxa (3261 of 15636) in the IUCN database use the code "LR/lc", which indicates they have not been re-evaluated since 2000
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Great Horned Owl
About one dozen, see textGlobal range (all year) of B. virginianusSynonymsStrix virginiana Gmelin, 1788 and see textThe great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), also known as the tiger owl (originally derived from early naturalists' description as the "winged tiger" or "tiger of the air") or the hoot owl,[2] is a large owl native to the Americas. It is an extremely adaptable bird with a vast range and is the most widely distributed true owl in the Americas.[3] Its primary diet is rabbits and hares, rats and mice and voles, although it freely hunts any animal it can overtake, including rodents and other small mammals, larger mid-sized mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates
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Eurasian Eagle Owl
See text.Range of Eurasian eagle-owlSynonymsBubo ignavus Forster, 1817 Bubo maximus [2]The Eurasian eagle-owl
Eurasian eagle-owl
(Bubo bubo) is a species of eagle-owl that resides in much of Eurasia. It is also called the European eagle-owl and in Europe, it is occasionally abbreviated to just eagle-owl.[3] It is one of the largest species of owl, and females can grow to a total length of 75 cm (30 in), with a wingspan of 188 cm (6 ft 2 in), males being slightly smaller.[4] This bird has distinctive ear tufts, with upper parts that are mottled with darker blackish colouring and tawny. The wings and tail are barred. The underparts are a variably hued buff, streaked with darker colour
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