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Buddhist Mythology
Buddhism
Buddhism
includes a wide array of divine beings that are venerated in various ritual and popular contexts. Initially they included mainly Indian deities such as devas and yakshas, but later came to include other Asian spirits and local gods. They range from enlightened Buddhas to regional spirits adopted by Buddhists or practiced on the margins of the religion. Buddhists later also came to incorporate aspects from countries such as China and Japan into their pantheons.[1] As such, it includes many aspects taken from other mythologies of those cultures
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Bodhipakkhiyādhammā
In Buddhism, bodhipakkhiyā dhammā (Pali; variant spellings include bodhipakkhikā dhammā and bodhapakkhiyā dhammā;[1] Skt.: bodhipakṣa dharma) are qualities (dhammā) conducive or related to (pakkhiya) awakening (bodhi). In the Pali
Pali
commentaries, the term bodhipakkhiyā dhammā is used to refer to seven sets of such qualities regularly mentioned by the Buddha throughout the Pali
Pali
Canon
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Threefold Training
The Buddha
The Buddha
identified the threefold training (sikkhā)[1] as training in:higher virtue (adhisīla-sikkhā) higher mind (adhicitta-sikkhā) higher wisdom (adhipaññā-sikkhā)Contents1 In the Pali
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Refuge (Buddhism)
สรณะ, ที่พึ่ง ที่ระลึก RTGS: sarana, thi phueng thi raluekVietnamese Quy yGlossary of BuddhismBuddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels
Three Jewels
or Triple Gem (also known as the "Three Refuges"). The Three Jewels
Three Jewels
are:the Buddha, the fully enlightened one the Dharma, the teachings expounded by the Buddha the Sangha, the monastic order of Buddhism
Buddhism
that practice the DharmaRefuge is common to all major schools of Buddhism
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Buddhist Paths To Liberation
The Buddhist tradition gives a wide variety of descriptions of the Buddhist Path (magga) to liberation.[1] The classical description is the Noble Eightfold Path, described in the Sutta Pitaka. This description is preceded by even older descriptions in the Sutta Pitaka, and elaborated in the various Buddhist traditions
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Buddhist Ethics
Buddhist
Buddhist
ethics are traditionally based on what Buddhists view as the enlightened perspective of the Buddha, or other enlightened beings such as Bodhisattvas. The Indian term for ethics or morality used in Buddhism
Buddhism
is Śīla
Śīla
(Sanskrit: शील) or sīla (Pāli). Śīla
Śīla
in Buddhism
Buddhism
is one of three sections of the Noble Eightfold Path, and is a code of conduct that embraces a commitment to harmony and self-restraint with the principal motivation being nonviolence, or freedom from causing harm. It has been variously described as virtue,[1] right conduct,[2] morality,[3] moral discipline[4] and precept. Sīla is an internal, aware, and intentional ethical behavior, according to one's commitment to the path of liberation
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Pāramitā
Pāramitā
Pāramitā
(Sanskrit, Pali) or pāramī (Pāli) is "perfection" or "completeness". While, technically, pāramī and pāramitā are both Pāli terms, Pali
Pali
literature makes far greater reference to pāramī.Contents1 Etymology 2 Theravāda Buddhism2.1 Canonical sources 2.2 Historicity 2.3 Traditional practice3 Mahāyāna Buddhism 4 Tibetan Buddhism 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Works cited7 External linksEtymology[edit] Donald S. Lopez, Jr. describes the etymology of the term:The term pāramitā, commonly translated as "perfection," has two etymologies. The first derives it from the word parama, meaning "highest", "most distant", and hence "chief", "primary", "most excellent". Hence, the substantive can be rendered "excellence" or "perfection"
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Buddhist Meditation
Buddhist meditation
Buddhist meditation
is the practice of meditation in Buddhism
Buddhism
and Buddhist philosophy. It includes a variety of types of meditation. Core meditation techniques have been preserved in ancient Buddhist texts and have proliferated and diversified through teacher-student transmissions
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Buddhist Philosophy
Buddhism
Buddhism
portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t ePart of a series onPhilosophyPlato Kant NietzscheBuddha Confucius AverroesPhilosophersAestheticians Episte
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Sati (Buddhism)
Sati (in Pali;[1] Sanskrit: smṛti) is mindfulness or awareness, a spiritual or psychological faculty (indriya) that forms an essential part of Buddhist
Buddhist
practice. It is the first factor of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment
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Prajñā (Buddhism)
Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli) "wisdom" is insight in the true nature of reality, namely primarily anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), anattā (non-self) and śūnyatā (emptiness).Contents1 Etymology 2 Understanding in the Buddhist traditions2.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 2.2 Mahāyāna Buddhism3 See also 4 References 5 Sources5.1 Published sources 5.2 Web-sources6 External linksEtymology[edit] Prajñā is often translated as "wisdom", but is closer in meaning to "insight", "discriminating knowledge", or "intuitive apprehension".[1]jñā can be trans
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Karuṇā
Karuṇā
Karuṇā
(in both Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali) is generally translated as compassion.[1] It is part of the spiritual path of both Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism.Contents1 Buddhism1.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 1.2 Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism2 Jainism 3 Miscellaneous 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 External linksBuddhism[edit] Karuṇā
Karuṇā
is important in all schools of Buddhism. For Theravāda Buddhists, dwelling in karuṇā is a means for attaining a happy present life and heavenly rebirth
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Buddhist Monasticism
Buddhist
Buddhist
monasticism is one of the earliest surviving forms of organized monasticism in the history of religion. It is also one of the most fundamental institutions of Buddhism. Monks and nuns are considered to be responsible for the preservation and dissemination of the Buddha's teaching and the guidance of Buddhist
Buddhist
lay people.Contents1 History and development 2 Monastic life 3 Local variations3.1 Tibet 3.2 East Asia 3.3 Southeast Asia4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory and development[edit] Further information: Sangha The order of Buddhist
Buddhist
monks and nuns was founded by Gautama Buddha during his lifetime between the fifth and fourth centuries BC. The Buddhist
Buddhist
monastic lifestyle grew out of the lifestyle of earlier sects of wandering ascetics, some of whom the Buddha had studied under
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Tibetan Buddhist Canon
The Tibetan Buddhist canon
Tibetan Buddhist canon
is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various sects of Tibetan Buddhism. In addition to sutrayana texts from Early Buddhist (mostly Sarvastivada) and Mahayana sources, the Tibetan canon includes tantric texts.[1] The Tibetan Canon underwent a final compilation in the 14th century by Buton Rinchen Drub (1290–1364). The Tibetans did not have a formally arranged Mahayana
Mahayana
canon and so devised their own scheme which divided texts into two broad categories: Kangyur
Kangyur
(Wylie: bka'-'gyur) or "Translated Words", consists of works supposed to have been said by the Buddha himself
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Householder (Buddhism)
In English translations of Buddhist texts, householder denotes a variety of terms. Most broadly, it refers to any layperson, and most narrowly, to a wealthy and prestigious familial patriarch.[1] In contemporary Buddhist communities, householder is often used synonymously with laity, or non-monastics. The Buddhist notion of householder is often contrasted with that of wandering ascetics (Pali: Pāḷi: samaṇa; Sanskrit: śramaṇa) and monastics (bhikkhu and bhikkhuni), who would not live (for extended periods) in a normal house and who would pursue freedom from attachments to houses and families. Upāsakas and upāsikās, also called śrāvakas and śrāvikās - are householders and other laypersons who take refuge in the Three Jewels (the Buddha, the teachings and the community) and practice the Five Precepts. In southeast Asian communities, lay disciples also give alms to monks on their daily rounds and observe weekly uposatha days
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