HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
(March 27, 1914 – August 5, 2009) was an American screenwriter, television producer, novelist and sports writer. He was known for his 1941 novel, What Makes Sammy Run?, his 1947 novel The Harder They Fall, his 1954 Academy Award-winning screenplay for On the Waterfront, and his 1957 screenplay for A Face in the Crowd.Contents1 Early life and education 2 World War II 3 Career 4 Personal life and death 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born Seymour Wilson Schulberg, he was raised in a Jewish family[1] the son of Hollywood film-producer B. P. Schulberg
B. P

[...More...]

"Budd Schulberg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
[...More...]

"New York City" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kitzbühel
Kitzbühel
Kitzbühel
(German pronunciation: [ˈkɪtsbyːl]) is a small medieval town situated in the Kitzbühel Alps
Kitzbühel Alps
along the river Kitzbuhler Ache in Tyrol, Austria, about 100 kilometers (62 mi) east of the state capital Innsbruck
Innsbruck
and is the administrative centre of the Kitzbühel district (Bezirk). Kitzbühel
Kitzbühel
is a ski resort of international renown and its ski season lasts from mid October to early May
[...More...]

"Kitzbühel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
[...More...]

"New York (state)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Ford
John Ford
John Ford
(February 1, 1894 – August 31, 1973) was an American film director. He is renowned both for Westerns such as Stagecoach (1939), The Searchers
The Searchers
(1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
(1962), as well as adaptations of classic 20th-century American novels such as the film The Grapes of Wrath
The Grapes of Wrath
(1940). His four Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Best Director (in 1935, 1940, 1941, and 1952) remain a record
[...More...]

"John Ford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

VE Day
Victory in Europe
Europe
Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II
Allies of World War II
of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. The formal surrender of the German forces occupying the Channel Islands
Channel Islands
did not occur until the following day, 9 May 1945. It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe. The term VE Day existed as early as September 1944,[3] in anticipation of victory. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. Germany's surrender, therefore, was authorised by his successor, Reichspräsident
Reichspräsident
Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government
[...More...]

"VE Day" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nazi Concentration Camps
Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
maintained concentration camps (German: Konzentrationslager, KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled before and during the Second World War
[...More...]

"Nazi Concentration Camps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

War Criminals
A war crime is an act that constitutes a serious violation of the laws of war that gives rise to individual criminal responsibility.[1] Examples of war crimes include intentionally killing civilians or prisoners, torture, destroying civilian property, taking hostages, perfidy, rape, using child soldiers, pillaging, declaring that no quarter will be given, and serious violations of the principles of distinction and proportionality, such as strategic bombing of civilian populations.[2] The concept of war crimes emerged at the turn of the twentieth century when the body of customary international law applicable to warfare between sovereign states was codified. Such codification occurred at the national level, such as with the publication of the Lieber Code in the United States, and at the international level with the adoption of the treaties during the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907
[...More...]

"War Criminals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nuremberg Trials
Coordinates: 49°27.2603′N 11°02.9103′E / 49.4543383°N 11.0485050°E / 49.4543383; 11.0485050 The Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Trials (German: Die Nürnberger Prozesse) were a series of military tribunals held by the Allied forces under international law and the laws of war after World War II. The trials were most notable for the prosecution of prominent members of the political, military, judicial and economic leadership of Nazi Germany, who planned, carried out, or otherwise participated in the Holocaust and other war crimes. The trials were held in the city of Nuremberg, Germany, and their decisions marked a turning point between classical and contemporary international law. The first and best known set of these trials were those of the major war criminals before the International Military Tribunal (IMT)
[...More...]

"Nuremberg Trials" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chalet
A chalet (pronounced /ˈʃæleɪ/ in British English; in American English usually /ʃæˈleɪ/), also called Swiss chalet, is a type of building or house, typical of the Alpine region in Europe. It is made of wood, with a heavy, gently sloping roof and wide, well-supported eaves set at right angles to the front of the house.[1]Contents1 Definition and origin 2 Modern international usage 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyDefinition and origin[edit] The term chalet stems from Arpitan speaking part of Switzerland
Switzerland
and French Savoy
Savoy
and originally referred to the hut of a herder.[2]A 'chalet' in the hills to the east of Orosí, Costa RicaMany chalets in the European Alps
Alps
were originally used as seasonal farms for dairy cattle which would be brought up from the lowland pastures during the summer months
[...More...]

"Chalet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jason Robards
Jason Nelson Robards Jr. (July 26, 1922 – December 26, 2000) was an American stage, film, and television actor. He was a winner of the Tony Award, two Academy Awards
Academy Awards
and an Emmy Award. He was also a United States Navy combat veteran of World War II. He became famous playing works of American playwright Eugene O'Neill and regularly performed in O'Neill's works throughout his career. Robards was cast both in common-man roles and as well-known historical figures.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Naval service in World War II 3 Career 4 Awards 5 Personal life 6 Death 7 Legacy 8 Work8.1 Stage 8.2 Film 8.3 Television9 References 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Robards was born July 26, 1922, in Chicago, the son of Hope Maxine (née Glanville) Robards and Jason Robards, Sr.,[3] an actor who regularly appeared on the stage and in such early films as The Gamblers (1929)
[...More...]

"Jason Robards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

F. Scott Fitzgerald
Francis Scott Key
Francis Scott Key
Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American writer, whose works illustrate the Jazz Age. While he achieved limited success in his lifetime, he is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. Fitzgerald is considered a member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night
[...More...]

"F. Scott Fitzgerald" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tony Award
The Antoinette Perry
Antoinette Perry
Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre,[1] more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes excellence in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League[2] at an annual ceremony in New York City. The awards are given for Broadway productions and performances, and an award is given for regional theatre
[...More...]

"Tony Award" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Grizzard
George Cooper Grizzard, Jr. (April 1, 1928 – October 2, 2007) was an American Emmy Award- and Tony Award-winning actor of film, stage, and television. He appeared in more than 40 films, dozens of television programs, and a number of Broadway plays.Contents1 Life and career 2 Death 3 Selected TV and filmography 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit]Grizzard and Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
in a 1961 presentation of W. Somerset Maugham's A String of BeadsGrizzard was born in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, the son of Mary Winifred (née Albritton) and George Cooper Grizzard, an accountant.[2] Grizzard memorably appeared as an unscrupulous United States senator in the film Advise and Consent
Advise and Consent
in 1962
[...More...]

"George Grizzard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

House Un-American Activities Committee
The House Un-American Activities Committee
House Un-American Activities Committee
(HUAC, or House Committee on Un-American Activities, or HCUA) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. The HUAC was created in 1938 to investigate alleged disloyalty and subversive activities on the part of private citizens, public employees, and those organizations suspected of having communist ties. In 1969, the House changed the committee's name to "House Committee on Internal Security". When the House abolished the committee in 1975,[1] its functions were transferred to the House Judiciary Committee. The committee's anti-communist investigations are often associated with those of Joseph McCarthy[2] who, as a U.S. Senator, had no direct involvement with this House committee.[3] McCarthy was the chairman of the Government Operations Committee and its Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the U.S
[...More...]

"House Un-American Activities Committee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sports Illustrated
Managing Editor SI.com: Stephen Cannella Managing Editor SI Golf
Golf
Group: Jim Gorant Creative Director: Christopher Hercik Director of Photography: Brad Smith[1] Senior Editor, Chief of Reporters: Richard Demak Senior Editors: Mark Bechtel, Trisha Lucey Blackmar, MJ Day (Swimsuit); Mark Godich; Stefanie Kaufman (Operations); Kostya P. Kennedy, Diane Smith (Swimsuit) 'Senior Writers: Kelli Anderson, Lars Anderson, Chris Ballard, Michael Bamberger, George Dohrmann, David Epstein, Michael Farber, Damon Hack, Lee Jenkins, Peter King, Thomas Lake, Tim Layden, J. Austin Murphy, Dan Patrick, Joe Posnanski, S.L. Price, Selena Roberts, Alan Shipnuck, Phil Taylor, Ian Thomsen, Jim Trotter, Gary Van Sickle, Tom Verducci, Grant Wahl, L
[...More...]

"Sports Illustrated" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.