HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Buccal Fat Pad
The buccal fat pad (also called Bichat’s fat pad, after Marie François Xavier Bichat, and the buccal pad of fat), is one of several encapsulated fat masses in the cheek. It is a deep fat pad located on either side of the face between the buccinator muscle and several more superficial muscles (including the masseter, the zygomaticus major, and the zygomaticus minor).[1] The inferior portion of the buccal fat pad is contained within the buccal space. It should not be confused with the malar fat pad, which is directly below the skin of the cheek.[2] It should also not be confused with jowl fat pads
[...More...]

"Buccal Fat Pad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Levator Labii Superioris Alaeque Nasi Muscle
The levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle is, translated from Latin, the "lifter of both the upper lip and of the wing of the nose". It has the longest name of any muscle in an animal. The muscle is attached to the upper frontal process of the maxilla and inserts into the skin of the lateral part of the nostril and upper lip. Overview[edit] Historically known as Otto's muscle, it dilates the nostril and elevates the upper lip, enabling one to snarl. Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
is famous for his use of this expression, earning the muscle's nickname "The Elvis muscle"
[...More...]

"Levator Labii Superioris Alaeque Nasi Muscle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gingival Fibers
The gingival fibers are the connective tissue fibers that inhabit the gingival tissue adjacent to teeth and help hold the tissue firmly against the teeth.[1] They are primarily composed of type I collagen, although type III fibers are also involved. These fibers, unlike the fibers of the periodontal ligament, in general, attach the tooth to the gingival tissue, rather than the tooth to the alveolar bone.Contents1 Functions of the gingival fibers 2 Gingival fibers
Gingival fibers
and periodontitis 3 Types of gingival fibers 4 ReferencesFunctions of the gingival fibers[edit] The
[...More...]

"Gingival Fibers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Junctional Epithelium
The junctional epithelium (JE) is that epithelium which lies at, and in health also defines, the base of the gingival sulcus. The probing depth of the gingival sulcus is measured by a calibrated periodontal probe. In a healthy-case scenario, the probe is gently inserted, slides by the sulcular epithelium (SE), and is stopped by the epithelial attachment (EA). However, the probing depth of the gingival sulcus may be considerably different from the true histological gingival sulcus depth.Contents1 Location 2 Origin 3 Structure 4 Pathology 5 See also 6 ReferencesLocation[edit] The junctional epithelium, a nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium,[1] lies immediately apical to the sulcular epithelium, which lines the gingival sulcus from the base to the free gingival margin, where it interfaces with the epithelium of the oral cavity.The gingival sulcus is bounded by the enamel of the crown of the tooth and the sulcular epithelium
[...More...]

"Junctional Epithelium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mucogingival Junction
A mucogingival junction is an anatomical feature found on the intraoral mucosa. The mucosa of the cheeks and floor of the mouth are freely moveable and fragile, whereas the mucosa around the teeth and on the palate are firm and keratinized. Where the two tissue types meet is known as a mucogingival junction. There are three mucogingival junctions: on the facial of the maxilla and on both the facial and lingual of the mandible. The palatal gingiva of the maxilla is continuous with the tissue of the palate, which is bound down to the palatal bones
[...More...]

"Mucogingival Junction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sulcular Epithelium
The sulcular epithelium is that epithelium which lines the gingival sulcus.[1] It is apically bounded by the junctional epithelium and meets the epithelium of the oral cavity at the height of the free gingival margin. The sulcular epithelium is nonkeratinized.[1] References[edit]^ a b Carranza's Clinical Periodontology, W.B
[...More...]

"Sulcular Epithelium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stippling (dentistry)
The gingiva often possess a textured surface that is referred to as being stippled (engraved points).[1] Stippling only presents on the attached gingiva bound to underlying alveolar bone, not the freely moveable alveolar mucosa. Stippling used to be thought to indicate health, but it has since been shown that smooth gingiva is not an indication of disease, unless it is smooth due to a loss of previously existing stippling. Stippling is a consequence of the microscopic elevations and depressions of the surface of the gingival tissue due to the connective tissue projections within the tissue.[1] "The degree of keratinization and the prominence of stippling appear to be related."[1] To be more specific, stippling occurs at sites of fusion of the epithelial ridges (also known as rete pegs) and correspond to the fusion of the valleys created by the connective tissue papillae.[2] References[edit]^ a b c Itoiz, ME; Carranza, FA: The Gingiva
[...More...]

"Stippling (dentistry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Terminologia Anatomica
Terminologia Anatomica (TA) is the international standard on human anatomic terminology
[...More...]

"Terminologia Anatomica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
[...More...]

"PubMed Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cleft Lip And Palate
Cleft lip and cleft palate, also known as orofacial cleft, is a group of conditions that includes cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and both together (CLP).[1][2] A cleft lip contains an opening in the upper lip that may extend into the nose.[1] The opening may be on one side, both sides, or in the middle.[1] A cleft palate is when the roof of the mouth contains an opening into the nose.[1] These disorders can result in feeding problems, speech problems, hearing problems, and frequent ear infections.[1] Less than half the time the condition is associated with other disorders.[1] Cleft lip and palate
[...More...]

"Cleft Lip And Palate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ramus Of The Mandible
The mandible, lower jaw or jawbone is the largest, strongest and lowest bone in the human face.[2] It forms the lower jaw and holds the lower teeth in place. The mandible sits beneath the maxilla. The mandible is the only movable bone of the skull not counting the ossicles of the middle ear. The bone is formed from a fusion of left and right processes, and the point where these sides join, the mandibular symphysis, is still visible as a faint ridge in the midline
[...More...]

"Ramus Of The Mandible" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Orbicularis Oris Muscle
In human anatomy, the orbicularis oris muscle is a complex of muscles in the lips that encircles the mouth. Until recently, it was misinterpreted as a sphincter, or circular muscle, but it is actually composed of four independent quadrants that interlace and give only an appearance of circularity.[3] It is also one of the muscles used in the playing of all brass instruments and some woodwind instruments. This muscle closes the mouth and puckers the lips when it contracts.Contents1 Anatomy 2 Clinical significance 3 Additional images 4 References 5 External linksAnatomy[edit] The orbicularis oris is not a simple sphincter muscle like the orbicularis oculi; it consists of numerous strata of muscular fibers surrounding the orifice of the mouth, but having different direction. It consists partly of fibers derived from the other facial muscles which are inserted into the lips, and partly of fibers proper to the lips
[...More...]

"Orbicularis Oris Muscle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhytidectomy
A facelift, technically known as a rhytidectomy (from Ancient Greek ῥυτίς (rhytis) "wrinkle" + ἐκτομή (ektome) "excision", surgical removal of wrinkles), is a type of cosmetic surgery procedure used to give a more youthful facial appearance. There are multiple surgical techniques and exercise routines. Surgery
Surgery
usually involves the removal of excess facial skin, with or without the tightening of underlying tissues, and the redraping of the skin on the patient's face and neck. Exercise routines tone underlying facial muscles without surgery
[...More...]

"Rhytidectomy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buccinator Muscle
The buccinator (/ˈbʌksɪneɪtər/[2][3] ) is a thin quadrilateral muscle, occupying the interval between the maxilla and the mandible at the side of the face
[...More...]

"Buccinator Muscle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.