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Bubble Chart
A bubble chart is a type of chart that displays three dimensions of data. Each entity with its triplet (v1, v2, v3) of associated data is plotted as a disk that expresses two of the vi values through the disk's xy location and the third through its size. Bubble charts can facilitate the understanding of social, economical, medical, and other scientific relationships. Bubble charts can be considered a variation of the scatter plot, in which the data points are replaced with bubbles. As the documentation for Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office
explains, "You can use a bubble chart instead of a scatter chart if your data has three data series that each contain a set of values
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Radius
In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any of the line segments from its center to its perimeter, and in more modern usage, it is also their length. The name comes from the Latin
Latin
radius, meaning ray but also the spoke of a chariot wheel.[1] The plural of radius can be either radii (from the Latin
Latin
plural) or the conventional English plural radiuses.[2] The typical abbreviation and mathematical variable name for radius is r. By extension, the diameter d is defined as twice the radius:[3] d ≐ 2 r ⇒ r = d 2 . displaystyle ddoteq 2rquad Rightarrow quad r= frac d 2 . If an object does not have a center, the term may refer to its circumradius, the radius of its circumscribed circle or circumscribed sphere
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Map
A map is a symbolic depiction emphasizing relationships between elements of some space, such as objects, regions, or themes. Many maps are static, fixed to paper or some other durable medium, while others are dynamic or interactive. Although most commonly used to depict geography, maps may represent any space, real or imagined, without regard to context or scale, such as in brain mapping, DNA mapping, or computer network topology mapping. The space being mapped may be two dimensional, such as the surface of the earth, three dimensional, such as the interior of the earth, or even more abstract spaces of any dimension, such as arise in modeling phenomena having many independent variables. Although the earliest maps known are of the heavens, geographic maps of territory have a very long tradition and exist from ancient times. The word "map" comes from the medieval Latin
Latin
Mappa mundi, wherein mappa meant napkin or cloth and mundi the world
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Edward Tufte
Edward Rolf Tufte (/ˈtʌfti/;[2] born March 14, 1942)[1] is an American statistician and professor emeritus of political science, statistics, and computer science at Yale University.[3] He is noted for his writings on information design and as a pioneer in the field of data visualization.[4]Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Information design 2.2 Criticism of PowerPoint 2.3 Small multiple 2.4 Sparkline 2.5 Sculpture3 Bibliography3.1 Works on political economy 3.2 Works of analytic design 3.3 Exhibitions4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Edward Rolf Tufte was born in 1942 in Kansas City, Missouri, to Virginia Tufte and Edward E. Tufte (1912–1999)
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Pivot Chart
A pivot chart is a data analysis tool that enables one to visualize a pivot table. It is a built-in feature of Microsoft Excel
Microsoft Excel
and Microsoft Access. The single word PivotChart is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.Contents1 Overview 2 Pivot chart for Microsoft Excel 3 Pivot chart for Microsoft Access
Microsoft Access
(v. 2010 and previous) 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] PivotChart is a type of graph for the analysis of data. The most useful feature is the possibility of quickly changing the portion of data displayed, like a PivotTable report
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SimulTrain
SimulTrain
SimulTrain
is a Project Management Simulator used in project management training programs. SimulTrain
SimulTrain
is a simulation of the planning and execution phases of a medium-sized project, that involves all of the events that occur.[1] SimulTrain
SimulTrain
is a computer-based multimedia tool which allows the participants to learn:to structure a project; to control the progress of a project; to use project management tools.Contents1 Overview 2 Pedagogic concept 3 Scenarios3.1 IT service deployment project 3.2 Production project 3.3 Marketing project 3.4 Organizing a sport event 3.5 Agile hybrid software development 3.6 Portfolio Management Simulation4 References 5 External links 6 See alsoOverview[edit]RACI Chart.[2]The first version of SimulTrain
SimulTrain
was released in 1996. This educational software has been constantly improved
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Congruence (geometry)
In geometry, two figures or objects are congruent if they have the same shape and size, or if one has the same shape and size as the mirror image of the other.[1] More formally, two sets of points are called congruent if, and only if, one can be transformed into the other by an isometry, i.e., a combination of rigid motions, namely a translation, a rotation, and a reflection. This means that either object can be repositioned and reflected (but not resized) so as to coincide precisely with the other object
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Absolute Value
In mathematics, the absolute value or modulus x of a real number x is the non-negative value of x without regard to its sign. Namely, x = x for a positive x, x = −x for a negative x (in which case −x is positive), and 0 = 0. For example, the absolute value of 3 is 3, and the absolute value of −3 is also 3. The absolute value of a number may be thought of as its distance from zero. Generalisations of the absolute value for real numbers occur in a wide variety of mathematical settings. For example, an absolute value is also defined for the complex numbers, the quaternions, ordered rings, fields and vector spaces
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Metaphoric
A metaphor is a figure of speech that directly refers to one thing by mentioning another for rhetorical effect.[1] It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two ideas. Antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy and simile are all types of metaphor.[2] One of the most commonly cited examples of a metaphor in English literature is the "All the world's a stage" monologue from As You Like It:All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances ... —William Shakespeare, As You Like It, 2/7[3]This quotation expresses a metaphor because the world is not literally a stage. By asserting that the world is a stage, Shakespeare uses points of comparison between the world and a stage to convey an understanding about the mechanics of the world and the behavior of the people within it. The Philosophy of Rhetoric
Rhetoric
(1937) by rhetorician I. A
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Square Root
In mathematics, a square root of a number a is a number y such that y2 = a; in other words, a number y whose square (the result of multiplying the number by itself, or y⋅y) is a.[1] For example, 4 and −4 are square roots of 16 because 42 = (−4)2 = 16. Every nonnegative real number a has a unique nonnegative square root, called the principal square root, which is denoted by √a, where √ is called the radical sign or radix. For example, the principal square root of 9 is 3, which is denoted by √9 = 3, because 32 = 3 • 3 = 9 and 3 is nonnegative. The term (or number) whose square root is being considered is known as the radicand. The radicand is the number or expression underneath the radical sign, in this example 9. Every positive number a has two square roots: √a, which is positive, and −√a, which is negative. Together, these two roots are denoted as ± √a (see ± shorthand)
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Circumference
In geometry, the circumference (from Latin circumferentia, meaning "carrying around") of a circle is the (linear) distance around it.[1] That is, the circumference would be the length of the circle if it were opened up and straightened out to a line segment. Since a circle is the edge (boundary) of a disk, circumference is a special case of perimeter.[2] The perimeter is the length around any closed figure and is the term used for most figures excepting the circle and some circular-like figures such as ellipses
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Diameter
In geometry, a diameter of a circle is any straight line segment that passes through the center of the circle and whose endpoints lie on the circle. It can also be defined as the longest chord of the circle. Both definitions are also valid for the diameter of a sphere. In more modern usage, the length of a diameter is also called the diameter. In this sense one speaks of the diameter rather than a diameter (which refers to the line itself), because all diameters of a circle or sphere have the same length, this being twice the radius r. d = 2 r ⇒ r = d 2 . displaystyle d=2rquad Rightarrow quad r= frac d 2 . For a convex shape in the plane, the diameter is defined to be the largest distance that can be formed between two opposite parallel lines tangent to its boundary, and the width is often defined to be the smallest such distance
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Area
Area
Area
is the quantity that expresses the extent of a two-dimensional figure or shape, or planar lamina, in the plane
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Human Visual System
The visual system is the part of the central nervous system which gives organisms the ability to process visual detail, as well as enabling the formation of several non-image photo response functions. It detects and interprets information from visible light to build a representation of the surrounding environment. The visual system carries out a number of complex tasks, including the reception of light and the formation of monocular representations; the buildup of a nuclear binocular perception from a pair of two dimensional projections; the identification and categorization of visual objects; assessing distances to and between objects; and guiding body movements in relation to the objects seen. The psychological process of visual information is known as visual perception, a lack of which is called blindness
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Microsoft Office
Microsoft
Microsoft
Office is a family of client software, server software, and services developed by Microsoft. It was first announced by Bill Gates on 1 August 1988, at COMDEX in Las Vegas. Initially a marketing term for an office suite (bundled set of productivity applications), the first version of Office contained Microsoft
Microsoft
Word, Microsoft
Microsoft
Excel, and Microsoft
Microsoft
PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft
Microsoft
also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand
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