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Bromaghin Peak
Bromaghin Peak, at 10,225 feet (3,117 m) above sea level is the fourth highest peak in the Smoky Mountains of Idaho. The peak is in Sawtooth National Recreation Area
Sawtooth National Recreation Area
about 0.6 miles (0.97 km) north-northwest of the range's highest point, Saviers Peak. The peak is named for Captain Ralph Bromaghin, who was a member of the 10th Mountain Division and a Sun Valley ski instructor who died in World War II.[3][4] References[edit]^ a b "Bromaghin Peak, Idaho". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved December 19, 2012.  ^ "Bromaghin Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved December 19, 2012.  ^ Sawtooth National Forest (Map) (1998 ed.). Sawtooth National Forest, U.S. Forest Service.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "Bromaghin Peak". SummitPost.org
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Blaine County, Idaho
Blaine County is a county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Idaho. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,376.[1] The county seat and largest city is Hailey.[2] Blaine County was created by the state legislature on March 5, 1895, by combining Alturas and Logan counties.[3] Its present boundaries were set on February 8, 1917, when a western portion became Camas County.[4] The county is named after former congressman and 1884 Republican presidential nominee James G. Blaine
James G

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Sawtooth National Recreation Area
The Sawtooth National Recreation Area
National Recreation Area
(SNRA) is a National Recreation Area located in central Idaho, United States
United States
that is managed as part of Sawtooth National Forest. The recreation area, established on August 22, 1972, is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and includes the Sawtooth, Hemingway–Boulders, and Cecil D. Andrus–White Clouds wilderness areas.[2][3][4] Activities within the 730,864-acre (2,957.70 km2) recreation area include hiking, backpacking, White water rafting, camping, rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, fishing, and hunting.[1][5] The SNRA headquarters are about seven miles (11 km) north of Ketchum on Highway 75
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Black Pine Cone
Black
Black
is the darkest color, the result of the absence or complete absorption of visible light. It is an achromatic color, literally a color without hue, like white (its opposite) and gray.[1] It is often used symbolically or figuratively to represent darkness, while white represents light.[2] Black
Black
ink is the most common color used for printing books, newspapers and documents, because it has the highest contrast with white paper and is the easiest to read. For the same reason, black text on a white screen is the most common format used on computer screens.[3] In color printing it is used along with the subtractive primaries cyan, yellow, and magenta, in order to help produce the darkest shades. Black
Black
and white have often been used to describe opposites; particularly truth and ignorance, good and evil, the "Dark Ages" versus Age of Enlightenment
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Stripe Mountain
A mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges. High elevations on mountains produce colder climates than at sea level
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Clearwater Mountains
Clearwater
Clearwater
or Clear Water may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Other 4 See alsoPeople[edit]William H
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Idaho
Idaho
Idaho
(/ˈaɪdəhoʊ/ ( listen)) is a state in the northwestern region of the United States. It borders the state of Montana
Montana
to the east and northeast, Wyoming
Wyoming
to the east, Nevada
Nevada
and Utah
Utah
to the south, and Washington and Oregon
Oregon
to the west. To the north, it shares a small portion of the Canadian border with the province of British Columbia. With a population of around 1.6 million and an area of 83,569 square miles (216,440 km2), Idaho
Idaho
is the 14th largest, the 12th least populous and the 7th least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The state's capital and largest city is Boise. Idaho
Idaho
prior to European settlement was inhabited by Native American peoples, some of whom still live in the area
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Mount Harrison (Idaho)
Harrison
Harrison
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Transportation 4 See alsoPeople[edit] Harrison
Harrison
(name)Places[edit] For the village in Iran, see Harisan. See also:
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Albion Mountains
A mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges. High elevations on mountains produce colder climates than at sea level
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Sun Valley, Idaho
Sun Valley is a resort city in Blaine County in central Idaho, in the western United States. The resort is adjacent to the city of Ketchum and within the greater Wood River valley. The population was 1,406 at the 2010 census, down from 1,427 in 2000.[4] The elevation of Sun Valley (at the Lodge) is 5,920 feet (1,805 m) above sea level. Scheduled passenger airline service is available via the Friedman Memorial Airport located in nearby Hailey, approximately 15 miles (25 km) south. Visitors to Sun Valley are relatively close to the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, accessed over Galena Summit
Galena Summit
on State Highway 75, the Sawtooth Scenic Byway. Among skiers, the term "Sun Valley" refers to the alpine ski area, which consists of Bald Mountain, the main ski mountain adjacent to Ketchum, and Dollar Mountain, adjacent to Sun Valley, for novice and lower intermediate skiers
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10th Mountain Division (United States)
World War IINorth Apennines Po ValleySomaliaOperation Restore Hope Operation Continue HopeHaitiOperation Uphold DemocracyWar on TerrorWar in Afghanistan Operation Anaconda Battle of Shah-e-Kot Battle for Gardez Operation Mountain Resolve Operation Mountain Viper Operation Avalanche
Avalanche
(Afghanistan) Iraq
Iraq
War Siege of Sadr City Operation Inherent ResolveOperation Atlantic ResolveCommandersCurrent commander Major General
Major General
Walter Piatt (2017–present)[2]Notable commanders George P. Hays James Edward Moore Thomas L. Harrold Philip De Witt Ginder Barksdale Hamlett James L. Campbell Franklin L. Hagenbeck Lloyd Austin Benjamin C. Freakley Michael L. Oates James L. Terry Mark A
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Yosemite Decimal System
The Yosemite Decimal System (YDS) is a three-part system used for rating the difficulty of walks, hikes, and climbs, primarily used by mountaineers in the United States
United States
and Canada. It was first devised by members of the Sierra Club
Sierra Club
in Southern California
Southern California
in the 1950s as a refinement of earlier systems, particularly those developed in Yosemite Valley, and quickly spread throughout North America. The class 5 portion of the class scale is primarily a rock climbing classification system, while the classes 1-3 are used mainly in hiking and trail running. Class 4 is an "in-between" rating that describes a very exposed scramble, corresponding roughly to the IFAS classification of PD+. Originally the system was a single-part classification system. "Grade" and "protection" categories were later added to the system
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Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
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Scrambling
Scrambling
Scrambling
(also known as alpine scrambling) is "a walk up steep terrain involving the use of one's hands".[1] It is an ambiguous term that lies somewhere between hiking, hillwalking, mountaineering, and rock climbing.[2] Canyoning
Canyoning
often involves scrambling. Alpine scrambling is scrambling in high mountains like the Alps
Alps
and the Rockies
Rockies
of North America, and may not follow a defined or waymarked path.[3] The Mountaineers climbing organization defines alpine scrambling as follows:[4]Alpine Scrambles are off-trail trips, often on snow or rock, with a 'non-technical' summit as a destination. A non-technical summit is one that is reached without the need for certain types of climbing equipment (body harness, rope, protection hardware, etc), and not involving travel on extremely steep slopes or on glaciers
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